601 CE and Earlier

Which Solstice for Stonehenge?

While Stonehenge is a popular attraction for those wishing to celebrate the Summer Solstice, the monument may actually have been constructed to celebrate the Winter holiday.

Deutsche Welle: German "Murder Victim" Actually Bog Girl

A mummified body, originally believed to be a murder victim, has been identified as that of a teenage girl... a 2,700-year-old teenage girl. The remains were discovered in a peat bog near Uchte, Lower Saxony.

New exhibit on ancient Yemeni art at the Sackler

"Caravan Kingdoms: Yemen and the Ancient Incense Trade" is now on display at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, in Washington, DC.

Cellphone Tower Damages Japanese Burial Site

The construction of a cellphone tower near Osaka, Japan has seriously damaged a previsouly undisturbed sixth century tomb.

Teacher Works to Excavate Roman Fort in Romania

A Mississippi high school teacher is among the archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort at Halmyris in the delta where the Danube River empties into the Black Sea.

History of Tablet Weaving Exhibit in Germany

Alamennenmuseum Ellwangen, near Ulm, Germany, is hosting an exhibit on the history of tablet weaving from 1000 B.C. E. to the early Middle Ages and Viking periods.

Hi-Tech Gadgets to Help Read Manuscripts

The world's oldest monastery, Saint Catherine's in the Sinai Desert, plans to use hi-tech cameras to shed new light on ancient Christian texts preserved for centuries within its fortress walls.

Roodee Highlights Roman Festival

A Roman Roodee, which includes chariot races and gladiator fights, has become a popular feature of Chester, England's Roman Festival. The event takes place June 25-26, 2005.

2nd Century Roman Barge Discovered in Rhine

A well-preserved Roman barge has been discovered at the bottom of the Rhine River in the Netherlands. The vessel is the oldest of its type ever discovered in the country.

Ancient Britain Remapped

Ordnance Survey of Southampton, England, is set to release a new historical map of ancient Britain, complete with place names, roads and landmarks.

Roman/Celtic Coins Found in Netherlands

Archaeologists working on a dig in the Netherlands have discovered 17 ancient Celtic coins. The coins were the first such discovered in the country.

Eat Like a Roman

Visitors to the archaeological site at Pompeii can get a firsthand idea of the Roman diet by purchasing kits containing ingredients commonly found on Roman tables.

Carlisle Visitors Received Royal Treatment

Visitors to Roman Carlisle received royal treatment, according to new archaeological finds which included the remains of a bathhouse.

Loch Lomond Dig is "Archaeologist's Dream"

A recent archaeological dig near Loch Lomond, Scotland, has produced rare artifacts from periods spanning 4,000 years.

Synagogue Mosaics to be Exhibited

The Brooklyn Museum will present an exhibition of 21 Roman mosaics from an ancient synagogue when it hosts Tree of Paradise: Jewish Mosaics from the Roman Empire.

Socks With Sandals?

Not just for dorks anymore! New evidence shows that Romans made the wearing of socks with sandals ultra chic!

National Geographic: Antibiotics in African Beer Gave Health Boost

A new study of the bones of 4th century Nubian people from the Sudan in North Africa leads experts to speculate that their beer may have had antibiotic properties.

New Section of Hadrian's Wall Discovered

A team of archaeologists have identified artifacts and wall fragments, discovered during a road construction project, as belonging to a previously unknown section of Hadrian's Wall.

Particle Accelerator used to reveal Archimedes' words on Palimpsest

The only known copy of Archimedes work known as the treatise "Method of Mechanical Theorems" may soon be visible again.

Quarry Dig Reveals Iron Age Shoe

The oldest Iron Age shoe ever discovered in the United Kingdom has been unearthed at a quarry near Wellington, England. The 2,000-year-old shoe has still visible lace holes.

Third Century Fort Discovered in China

An ancient Chinese fort from the Kingdom of Wei has been discovered by archaeologists in China's eastern Anhui province.

Volunteers Donate Time to Vindolanda Excavations

Volumteer archaeologists are welcome at Vindolanda, the Roman fort in Northumberland, England.

Roman water-lifting machine recreated in London

Researchers at the Museum of London have re-created a Roman water-lifting machine from artifacts discovered in 2001 beneath London's streets.

Linen, the Fabric of Their Lives

The commercial web site Esoteric Creations has posted an article on the history of linen and the importance of its use in the clothing of the people of Egypt and Middle Ages Europe.

Carnegie Museum to Host Bog People

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania will present The Mysterious Bog People July 9, 2005- January 23, 2006.

"Beautifully Preserved" Bathhouse Discovered in Colchester

The remains of a "beautifully preserved" room dating to Roman times have been discovered beneath the Sixth Form College in Colchester, England.

Props Needed for History Channel Program

Andy Oakland, a props master for the History Channel, is looking for some Bronze Age props in the Boston, Massachusetts area.

Roman rabbit dinner may pinpoint introduction of rabbits to England

The 2000-year-old remains of a butchered rabbit, thought to have been the dinner of a Roman, have led scholars to believe that rabbits were introduced to Britain following the Roman invasion in the year 43 AD.

The Mummy Returns! Bodies from the Bogs

Archaeological examinations of naturally-preserved bodies retrieved from bogs provide valuable insights into the daily lives and cultural values of ancient civilizations. Dame Aoife takes us on a tour in this week's installment of Aoife's Links.

Mons Graupius Not in Scotland's Grampian

Residents of Scotland's Northeast, known as the Grampian, are up in arms over claims that the famous Roman battle of Mons Graupius did not actually take place in the region.