601 CE and Earlier

Alken Bog site of human sacrifice?

Post-Roman Germania was a dangerous place, both for intenders invaders and those who found themselves on the bad side of the warlord. This was the conclusion of a team of Danish archaeologists investigating a bog in present day Denmark where the team discovered the remains of 40 men "hacked to bits and thrown into the shallows of Lake Mosso."

"Spectacular colorful mosaic" found in Kibbutz Bet Qama dig

Archaeologists working on an excavation at Kibbutz Bet Qama, in the B’nei Shimon region of Israel were surprised to discover a beautifully-preserved, Byzantine mosaic dating to the 4th - 6th centuries. The mosaic adorned the floor in what experts believe was a public building. (photo)

London's "lost stream" yields treasures.

Beneath the streets of London runs a river of gold - not actual gold and not actually a river, but archaeological gold in the form of the "lost" Walbrook River. Dubbed "the Pompeii of the north," the thick layer of mud has been a treasure trove of Roman artifacts, from a gladiator’s amber amulet to entire buildings. (photos and video)

"Romans Revealed" project allows children to "dig" into diversity of Roman Britain

A new interactive website, aimed at children, has been launched by the Runnymede Trust and archaeologists from the University of Reading. The site focusses on the diversity of Roman Britain by allowing children to learn about Roman residents such as the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady,’ a "high status young woman of North African descent who remains were buried in Roman York."

Scottish "wall" built fifty years before Hadrian's

BBC History Magazine reports that archaeologists have identified a first century Roman defense system that extended 120 miles across Scotland. The series of forts, watchtowers and defensive ditches predates Hadrian's Wall by 50 years, and the Antonine Wall by 20. (photos and map)

Public encouraged to participate in Navenby dig

The recent discovery of what is believed to be a Roman dwelling, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, in Navenby, Lincolnshire, England, offers an opportunity to the public to participate in a real archaeological dig. Work on the site is being sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund and will continue until September.

Archaeologists hope to find Roman fort in Midlands flood zone

After serious flooding, the Environment Agency in England is studying plans to build flood defences along the River Derwent near Derby in the Midlands, but before that work begins, archaeologists are being given access to an area known to be the site of a Roman fort.

Construction workers find Bath's Roman wall

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of part of the 4th century Roman wall in England's city of Bath. The discovery was made during sewer repairs to Burton Street.

Tolkien inspiration on display in Hampshire

Eight years before J.R.R. Tolkien published The Hobbit, archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler sought the author's opinion about a cursed Roman ring discovered in Silchester, Hampshire in the 1920's. The ring, along with a tablet, cursing any thief who thought to steal it, are believed to have inspired Tolkien's One Ring.

Research article compares historical and mythical versions of Saint Patrick

According to an article by Laurel A. Rockefeller, "Saint" Bishop Patrick as we think of him is far more myth than history.

Roman baths found in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian resort town of Sozopol, on the Black Sea, has long attracted visitors wanting to relax. Now the discovery of a large stone thermae building shows that the attraction may stretch back to Roman times. (photo)

LIDAR may reveal camp of Hadrian's Wall builders

The study of a series of old LIDAR (light detection and ranging) aerial photos has led to the discovery of what may be a camp of the men who constructed Hadrian's Wall. The find could change the way historians view civilian life in Roman Britain.

Roman fare at Vindolanda

British chef John Crouch is an expert on Roman cookery. Recently he shared his knowledge with visitors to the Roman Army Museum at Vindolanda, along Hadrian's Wall, through a series of events that allowed participants to "sample a taste for themselves of the Roman diet."

Hadrian's Wall to get new visitor center

Northumberland National Park Authority and Youth Hostel Association have teamed up to back a new visitor center and youth hostel for Hadrian's Wall. More than UK£10m will be spent on the project.

Hunt to find Boudicca

The latest subject of interest for royal remains hunters is Boudicca, the warrior queen, who fought the Romans to defend Britain, who may lie beneath a Birmingham McDonalds or platform eight, nine or 10 at King's Cross Station.

Does Sudeley Castle conceal Roman ruins?

The recent discovery of a Roman column and the discovery last year of a stone relief of Roman god Cunomaglos have archaeologists calling for an investigation of Sudeley Castle in Winchcombe, England. Experts believe the castle may conceal a temple and a villa.

Cyber-archaeology in Petra

In its March 2013 issue, Antiquity Magazine reports on a partnership of several universities and organizations to use the latest developments in computer science and engineering to analyze archaeological sites. In this instance, they focus on the UNESCO World Heritage, Petra Archaeological Park.

Hadrian's Wall: Exciting New Aerial Photographs

Aerial photographs are rewriting the history of Hadrian's Wall. Images indicate there were hundreds - even thousands - of Iron Age settlements there long before the Romans. (photos, video)

Remnants of Iron Age Feast Found

Cattle skulls and thirteen cauldrons which showed residue of animal fats were unearthed in England.

London excavation yields wealth of Roman artifacts

Excavations at the former site of the Temple of Mithras in London, England have yielded over 10,000 artifacts, many in a remarkable state of preservation. The finds include a shoe, jewelery, documents, and table wares.

Portrait of a wealthy Roman

After nearly 2000 years, a wealthy Roman citizen whose remains were discovered 18 years ago in Caerleon, near Newport, Wales, has a face. (portrait)

Roman skeleton contains calcified ovarian tumor

Scientists from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain are studying the remains of a 5th century Roman woman found buried in a Roman cemetery in the archaeological site of La Fogonussa. The woman, aged 30 to 40 years, had suffered from an ovarian tumor.

Remarkable Roman Finds in London

Eight photos from London's "deepest" Roman dig include leather goods, tableware, a horse pendant and amber.

Avebury ranks second in world heritage sites

The "quiet, bucolic setting, the lack of crowds and the ability to wander freely" has won Avebury's stone circle in Wiltshire, England a second place among best world heritage sites by Which? travel magazine.

Roman "industrial complex" found in Wales

"We have a remarkably well-preserved Roman road in good condition and the site is throwing up all manner of interesting things including a lot of lead, which suggests it was connected with the lead workings on Halkyn Mountain," said Will Walker, of Earthworks Archaeology about the discovery of a Roman site near Flint, Wales.

"Weapons & War in the Iron Age" comes to the Western Science Center

The Western Science Center in Hemet, California is teaming up with La Sierra University to present Weapons & War in the Iron Age which "examines the important period of the 2nd millenium BC in the ancient Near East." The exhibit will open May 19, 2013.

Thawing Glacier Reveals Pre-Viking Tunic

A greenish-brown wool tunic was uncovered when a glacier in south Norway began retreating.

Wool fleece helps date Christian church

A tiny scrap of wool fleece, found in a grave, has helped to date an early Christian church in Maryport, Cumbria, England. The wool, which dated to the 3rd or 4th century CE, showed that a structure, accompanied by Christian burials, was probably a Christian church from the late Roman period.

The truth about Hadrian's Wall

All may not have been sweetness and light between the Romans and the local inhabitants during the time of the building of Hadrian's Wall in northern England. A new study suggests that the absence of settlements and artifacts proves that the Romans ejected the locals from the area of the wall.

Hadrian’s Wall trail faces erosion challenge

Hadrian's Wall faces a new challenge: waterlogged trails that are causing grass and soil erosion along the trail. Natural England has awarded the Hadrian’s Wall Trust UK£50,000 for drain repair, but visitors can also help.