601 CE and Earlier

Moroccan City Holds Secrets from Roman Through Medieval Times

Moroccan archaeologists from the National Institute of Archaeological Sciences and Heritage are combing through research discovered during a recent excavation of the Roman city of Thamusida and its medieval layers up to Islamic times.

Skara Brae: an Ancient Village Revealed

Archeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones, who lives in Orkney, looks at the ancient village of Skara Brae, the neolithic settlement on Scotland's windy northern isles.

Was Britain Rome's Treasure House?

Ancient Britain seems to have been the treasure trove for Rome since thousands of gold and silver artifacts dating to Roman times have been found there. Now a Welsh archaeologist thinks he knows why.

Iron Age Survivor

Would you have been voted off the Iron Age island? The BBC's History Trail lets players try their skills at a number of Iron Age survival skills.

MIT & MythBusters Take on Archimedes' "Death Ray"

After the failure of Jamie and Adam to reconstruct a working model of Archimedes' death ray for Mythbusters, scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have taken up the challenge.

Hannibal v. Rome

On Sunday October 30, 2005, the National Geographic Channel will present Hannibal v Rome a two-hour epic story of "an African warrior who would dare to challenge the impossible and shape the course of human history."

Brading Roman Villa Yields "Amazing Finds"

Archaeologist Kevin Trott is excited about recent excavations at Brading Roman Villa on England's Isle of Wight. His 400-page report dispells long-held myths and may "take the archaeological world by storm."

Claterna Emerges from the Italian Soil

After being buried for 1500 years, the Roman town of Claterna, bear Bologna, Italy, has begun to emerge from the soil. Excavations have already revealed patrician houses, metalworking sites and mosaic paving, as well as pottery and coins.

Kilts from Togas?

What did the Romans do for Scotland? Allan Burnett looks at the Roman legacy in the country from the Battle of Mons Graupius to the 3rd century, including an observation that the idea for the kilt may have come from the Roman toga.

National Geographic: Ancient Chinese Noodle Secret?

John Roach, reporting for National Geographic, writes that 4,000-year-old noodles, the oldest ever found, have been discovered in northwestern China. The well-preserved, thin noodles were buried in a bowl ten feet below ground.

Origin of White British Cattle Still a Mystery

A rare and mysterious breed of white British cattle has been traced to the Bronze Age where there were an important part of pre-Roman pagan rituals, but how the cattle came to Britain is still a mystery.

Homer's Ithaca Found?

British amateur archaeologist Robert Bittlestone believes he has found the location of Odysseus' fabled Ithaca as part of the Greek island of Cephalonia.

Iron Age Woman Found in Denmark

The skeletal remains of an Iron Age woman have been discovered in an ancient grave site near Copenhagen, Denmark. Believed to be from the 5th century, the woman was buried with her jewelry.

Lavish Byzantine Mansion to Open in Caesarea

Israel's Antiquities Authority has announced that the archaeological remains of a Byzantine mansion, complete with mosaic floors, have been excavated in the coastal city of Caesarea and will be open to the public.

The Return of Asterix

Fans of the Asterix comic book series will be glad to know that the first book in four years will be released in October 2005. The Sky Falls On His Head is the 33rd book in the series, which features the escapades of the Gallic warrior with the yellow moustache.

6th Century Mosaic to Remain in Gaza

Israeli authorities have abandoned plans to remove a 6th century Byzantine mosaic from the Gaza Strip.

Birthplace of Saint Patrick Discovered?

Ulverston archaeologist Steve Dickinson has done wonders for the tourist industry of Urswick, Cumbria. He may have discovered the birthplace of Saint Patrick.

Avebury Circle Lets Visitors Explore Ancient Mysteries

Not as famous as the nearby Stonehenge, but much more accessible, is the stone circle at Avebury, the largest in Europe. CNN takes a look at the mysterious Avebury circle in this report.

Italian Programmer "Googles" Roman Villa

History met science recently when an Italian computer programmer discovered what he believes is the ruins of a Roman villa by studying a map found on "Google Earth."

Chalk it up: Giant Medieval Hillside Figure

Dame Aoife offers a bevy of links about large chalk carvings, of which the virility-gifted Cerne Abbas Giant is the most famous, that decorate the hills of England.

5th Century Byzantine Church Discovered in Jordan

The remains of an early Byzantine church, dating from the 5th or 6th century, have been found near the town of Karak, Jordan.

The King of Stonehenge

Smithsonian Magazine looks at the "Amesbury Archer," the 4,300-year-old skeleton discovered near Stonehenge surrounded by archery gear.

DNA Test May Show Romans Visited China

Researcher Xie Xiaodong is trying to prove that ancient Romans made it to Northwest China's Gansu Province by comparing DNA evidence to establish a genetic link.

Lasers Used to Study Scotland's Callanish Stones

A 3-D laser scan of Scotland's 5,000-year-old Callanish Stones shows advanced stone-working skills and a great understanding of astronomy.

Hadrian's Wall Threatened by Tourists

Archaeologists for UNESCO World Heritage are worried that tourist activity at Scotland's Hadrian's Wall has damaged parts of the structure and recommend the restricting of some sections from the public.

Shroud of Turin Scholars to Meet

Scientists and religious scholars will meet in Dallas, Texas in September 2005 to present the latest research on the Shroud of Turin.

Bulgarian archaeological find said to "rival Troy"

In Sofia, Bulgaria, archaeologists have found over fifteen thousand gold ornaments, which they believe were created about 4100 years ago.

Roman Smelting Operation Found in Welsh Bog

Archaeologists working in Llancynfelyn, near Borth, Wales, have discovered a Roman "industrial estate" which includes a lead smelting operation.

Laser Technology Used to Re-create Ancient Harp

Engineers from the University of Liverpool in England have created a reproduction of an ancient Iraqi harp, the Lyre if Ur.

Constantine's Head Found in Sewer

Workers cleaning drains around the Roman Forum have discovered the marble head of Constantine dating from the early 4th century.