601 CE and Earlier

Birthplace of Saint Patrick Discovered?

Ulverston archaeologist Steve Dickinson has done wonders for the tourist industry of Urswick, Cumbria. He may have discovered the birthplace of Saint Patrick.

Avebury Circle Lets Visitors Explore Ancient Mysteries

Not as famous as the nearby Stonehenge, but much more accessible, is the stone circle at Avebury, the largest in Europe. CNN takes a look at the mysterious Avebury circle in this report.

Italian Programmer "Googles" Roman Villa

History met science recently when an Italian computer programmer discovered what he believes is the ruins of a Roman villa by studying a map found on "Google Earth."

Chalk it up: Giant Medieval Hillside Figure

Dame Aoife offers a bevy of links about large chalk carvings, of which the virility-gifted Cerne Abbas Giant is the most famous, that decorate the hills of England.

5th Century Byzantine Church Discovered in Jordan

The remains of an early Byzantine church, dating from the 5th or 6th century, have been found near the town of Karak, Jordan.

The King of Stonehenge

Smithsonian Magazine looks at the "Amesbury Archer," the 4,300-year-old skeleton discovered near Stonehenge surrounded by archery gear.

DNA Test May Show Romans Visited China

Researcher Xie Xiaodong is trying to prove that ancient Romans made it to Northwest China's Gansu Province by comparing DNA evidence to establish a genetic link.

Lasers Used to Study Scotland's Callanish Stones

A 3-D laser scan of Scotland's 5,000-year-old Callanish Stones shows advanced stone-working skills and a great understanding of astronomy.

Hadrian's Wall Threatened by Tourists

Archaeologists for UNESCO World Heritage are worried that tourist activity at Scotland's Hadrian's Wall has damaged parts of the structure and recommend the restricting of some sections from the public.

Shroud of Turin Scholars to Meet

Scientists and religious scholars will meet in Dallas, Texas in September 2005 to present the latest research on the Shroud of Turin.

Bulgarian archaeological find said to "rival Troy"

In Sofia, Bulgaria, archaeologists have found over fifteen thousand gold ornaments, which they believe were created about 4100 years ago.

Roman Smelting Operation Found in Welsh Bog

Archaeologists working in Llancynfelyn, near Borth, Wales, have discovered a Roman "industrial estate" which includes a lead smelting operation.

Laser Technology Used to Re-create Ancient Harp

Engineers from the University of Liverpool in England have created a reproduction of an ancient Iraqi harp, the Lyre if Ur.

Constantine's Head Found in Sewer

Workers cleaning drains around the Roman Forum have discovered the marble head of Constantine dating from the early 4th century.

Stonehenge Tunnel Estimate Jumps to £470m

The British government has re-evaluated plans to build a traffic tunnel under Stonehenge when a new estimate of £470m was announced.

History Channel to Explore Roman Engineering

On September 5, 2005 at 9:00 p.m., the History Channel is scheduled to present Rome: Engineering an Empire, a program highlighting the empire's use of engineering skills to build the phenomenal works of construction that we know today.

Welcome to Cinderbury: Iron Age Theme Park

Visitors to the Iron Age village of Cinderbury in England can step back in time and spend a night - or a week - living in the village.

Hadrian's Wall First Link in "Frontiers of the Roman Empire"

Hadrian's Wall is scheduled to be the first historic site in a trans-national Heritage Site Network known as "Frontiers of the Roman Empire."

New Research Project Planned for Stonehenge

A group of scientists has recommended that a new, comprehensive research project be launched to study Stonehenge. In Stonehenge: an Archaeological Research Framework, edited by Timothy Darvill of Bournemouth University, a plan is suggested to study the structure and its burial sites.

Bulgaria Unearths Thracian Riches

Archaeologists in Bulgaria have unearthed the treasure-filled tomb of what is thought to be a Thracian king.

Pompeii Treasure Trove Revealed

In 2000, archaeologists working on a Roman bath at the site of the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in Pompeii, Italy, were thrilled to discover a wicker basket containing a treasure trove of silver artifacts.

Times: St. George Inspired by Syrian Mosaic?

Experts are wondering if a newly-discovered mosaic depicting Bellerophon, mounted on Pegasus stabbing a chimera with a lance is might have been an inspiration for St. George and the dragon.

Bronze Orpheus Might Point to Tomb

Archaeologists working on a site near the village of Tatul in Bulgaria are hoping that the discovery of a rare bronze statue of Orpheus might lead to the hero's tomb.

Norfolk Site of Celtic Resistance

New evidence points to the English city of Norfolk as being a hub of Celtic resistance against Roman occupation. It may also have been the site of a "lost holocaust".

Toronto Company Hopes to Mine on Roman Site

Rio Narcea Gold Mines Ltd., a mining company based in Toronto, Canada, is battling archaeologists for the rights to a gold mine which lies beneath a Roman town in Asturias, Spain.

Time Team Hunts for Roman Treasure

Britain's Channel Four Time Team has opened new trenches at Dinnington, England with hopes of discovering Roman gold.

Gladiator Games Attract Tourists in Jordan

Dale Gavlak of the Associated Press reports on gladiator games which are being held in the Roman ruins of Jerash, Jordan. The games will feature chariot racing and gladiatorial combat that are sure crowd pleasers.

Stonehenge Quarry Found

University professor Tim Darvill believes he has discovered the Welsh quarry where the bluestones, which form the circle of Stonehenge, were mined.

Wales Center of Roman Military Might

The 2003 discovery of a large Roman fort near Dinefwr in Carmarthenshire, Wales has experts rewriting the Romans' place in Welsh history.

Iron Age Farm Discovered in England

Archaeologists have discovered an Iron Age settlement on farmaland near the English city of Cheltenham.