601 CE and Earlier

Key to ancestry: The true father of Ireland

One in 12 Irishmen are descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, a fifth century warlord, according to research by geneticists at Trinity College Dublin.

Roman Lattice-work panties and Coa Vestis in progress

This thread explores the creation and wearing of the filmy Coa Vestis, and Roman Lattice-work panties.

Hopefully, this helps to prove that Roman garb wasn't meant to be made from old bedsheets or broadcloth; the site attempts to bring awareness to the fact that Roman garb can be quite sensual and interesting, when done right, researched properly, and worn with dignity.

Just because Roman garb is generally easy to make does not mean it's easy to wear! (The Greeks, after all, had slaves that attended to the sole function of properly draping the master's clothing.)

Irish Bog Men Reveal Surprises

BBC radio interview with Ned Kelly, head of antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland reveals that "The preserved remains of two prehistoric men discovered in an Irish bog have revealed a couple of surprises --- one used hair gel and the other stood 6 foot 6 inches high, the tallest Iron Age body discovered."

Were Roman Builders Influenced by Great Wall?

Visy Zsolt, a professor of Archaeology at the University of Pecs in Hungary, believes that the construction of the Roman Limes may have been influenced by the Great Wall of China.

Skimpy Civvy Adorns G-String Gladiator

Divers working on a river site near a Roman fortress in England have discovered a bit of pottery depicting the rear portions of a g-string clad gladiator.

A Very PC Holiday!

Diane Roberts of NPR's Weekend Edition offered a very politically correct holiday greeting on Sunday, December 18, 2005 with a look at the winter holiday season, ancient Roman style.

Lost City Uncovered Under Syrian Desert

On the border between Syria and Iraq, archaeological excavation has uncovered the remains of a settlement from the fifth millenium BCE.

Newport Ship Skeleton Theory

A skeleton found under the Newport Ship could have belonged to a man who was decapitated in a sacrificial killing, a leading archaeologist working on the project says. But there is also the possibility that he met his end in the waters of the River Usk by drowning.

Skeleton Discovered Under 15th Century Ship is Much Older

Experts examining an Iron Age skeleton found discovered buried beneath a medieval ship in Newport, South Wales, say it is "remarkably well preserved." Tests on the bones by forensic archaeologists at Lampeter University, Mid Wales, have shown that they date back to 170 B.C.

Women Important in Roman Military Life

Archaeological evidence from Roman forts shows that women held an important place in Roman military life.

Historic Cornwall District Needs Volunteers to Preserve Archaeological Site

Wardens at an historic site in Cornwall are asking for help to conserve the archaeological remains on the landmark.

Bronze Age Pyramid Discovered in Bosnia

Archaeologists are marveling at what appears to be a Bronze Age pyramid found recently near Visoko, Bosnia-Herzegovina. If this is a true pyramid, it will be the first ever found in Europe.

In-Fighting Threatens Church of the Nativity

Squabbling over repairs to the basilica commemorating the birthplace of Jesus may endanger the Church of the Nativity, according to Telegraph reporter Tim Butcher. He writes that the three Christian communities in charge of maintaining the church cannot agree on restoration methods.

Rare Iron Age Burial Found in Scotland

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an Iron Age warrior near Dunbar, Scotland. The grave is only the third such ever found in the country.

Daymarks: Ancient Timekeeping

How did our ancestors keep track of time before clocks, wristwatches and cellphones? They used daymarks.

Roman Remedies

During this fly season, James Le Fanu of the Telegraph takes a look at Roman medicinal remedies, including some from the Materia Medica by Pedanius Dioscorides.

Roman Calçada Road Found in Portugal

A small stretch of Roman road has been discovered near Tavira, Portugal by historian Luís Fraga da Silva. The road originally connected the cities of Ossónoba and Balsa to Pax Júlia and dates to the 2nd century C.E.

Researcher Declares Shroud of Turin Genuine

Archaeologist and former nun Eugenia Nitowski believes that she has positive proof that the Shroud of Turin is genuine.

Early Pagan Well to be Restored

A stone well, in the Welsh city of Llanllyfni, near Caernarfon, has been scheduled for restoration as part of footpath project.

Crumbling Roman Walls May Affect Italian Tourism

The collapse of a wall in the ancient Forum in Rome has travelers concerned for their safety. The incident happened at the time when the Italian government is considering cuts to cultural programs.

Bibliotheca Alexandrina: Ancient and Modern

The sparkling, new library in Alexandria, Egypt has an enormous reputation to live up to. The original, built by Alexander's general Ptolemy I Soter, became known as the greatest library in the world.

Asterix Takes on the U.S.

Feisty comic strip hero Asterix has been making fools of the Romans for years. Now he has a new focus: the Bush Administration.

Walking Roman Scotland

The current online issue of Walkwise, Scotland's walking magazine, features a list of walking excursions that explore Roman sites in Scotland.

Oldest Church found at Armageddon

The ruins of the oldest Christian church in the Middle East, and probably the whole world, were discovered in the Megiddo prison area.

Life in Roman Scotland

Judy Vickers of the Scotsman looks at the Roman legacy in Scotland and how they influenced life north of Hadrian's Wall.

Moroccan City Holds Secrets from Roman Through Medieval Times

Moroccan archaeologists from the National Institute of Archaeological Sciences and Heritage are combing through research discovered during a recent excavation of the Roman city of Thamusida and its medieval layers up to Islamic times.

Skara Brae: an Ancient Village Revealed

Archeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones, who lives in Orkney, looks at the ancient village of Skara Brae, the neolithic settlement on Scotland's windy northern isles.

Was Britain Rome's Treasure House?

Ancient Britain seems to have been the treasure trove for Rome since thousands of gold and silver artifacts dating to Roman times have been found there. Now a Welsh archaeologist thinks he knows why.

Iron Age Survivor

Would you have been voted off the Iron Age island? The BBC's History Trail lets players try their skills at a number of Iron Age survival skills.

MIT & MythBusters Take on Archimedes' "Death Ray"

After the failure of Jamie and Adam to reconstruct a working model of Archimedes' death ray for Mythbusters, scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have taken up the challenge.