601 CE and Earlier

Bronze Age Pyramid Discovered in Bosnia

Archaeologists are marveling at what appears to be a Bronze Age pyramid found recently near Visoko, Bosnia-Herzegovina. If this is a true pyramid, it will be the first ever found in Europe.

In-Fighting Threatens Church of the Nativity

Squabbling over repairs to the basilica commemorating the birthplace of Jesus may endanger the Church of the Nativity, according to Telegraph reporter Tim Butcher. He writes that the three Christian communities in charge of maintaining the church cannot agree on restoration methods.

Rare Iron Age Burial Found in Scotland

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of an Iron Age warrior near Dunbar, Scotland. The grave is only the third such ever found in the country.

Daymarks: Ancient Timekeeping

How did our ancestors keep track of time before clocks, wristwatches and cellphones? They used daymarks.

Roman Remedies

During this fly season, James Le Fanu of the Telegraph takes a look at Roman medicinal remedies, including some from the Materia Medica by Pedanius Dioscorides.

Roman Calçada Road Found in Portugal

A small stretch of Roman road has been discovered near Tavira, Portugal by historian Luís Fraga da Silva. The road originally connected the cities of Ossónoba and Balsa to Pax Júlia and dates to the 2nd century C.E.

Researcher Declares Shroud of Turin Genuine

Archaeologist and former nun Eugenia Nitowski believes that she has positive proof that the Shroud of Turin is genuine.

Early Pagan Well to be Restored

A stone well, in the Welsh city of Llanllyfni, near Caernarfon, has been scheduled for restoration as part of footpath project.

Crumbling Roman Walls May Affect Italian Tourism

The collapse of a wall in the ancient Forum in Rome has travelers concerned for their safety. The incident happened at the time when the Italian government is considering cuts to cultural programs.

Bibliotheca Alexandrina: Ancient and Modern

The sparkling, new library in Alexandria, Egypt has an enormous reputation to live up to. The original, built by Alexander's general Ptolemy I Soter, became known as the greatest library in the world.

Asterix Takes on the U.S.

Feisty comic strip hero Asterix has been making fools of the Romans for years. Now he has a new focus: the Bush Administration.

Walking Roman Scotland

The current online issue of Walkwise, Scotland's walking magazine, features a list of walking excursions that explore Roman sites in Scotland.

Oldest Church found at Armageddon

The ruins of the oldest Christian church in the Middle East, and probably the whole world, were discovered in the Megiddo prison area.

Life in Roman Scotland

Judy Vickers of the Scotsman looks at the Roman legacy in Scotland and how they influenced life north of Hadrian's Wall.

Moroccan City Holds Secrets from Roman Through Medieval Times

Moroccan archaeologists from the National Institute of Archaeological Sciences and Heritage are combing through research discovered during a recent excavation of the Roman city of Thamusida and its medieval layers up to Islamic times.

Skara Brae: an Ancient Village Revealed

Archeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones, who lives in Orkney, looks at the ancient village of Skara Brae, the neolithic settlement on Scotland's windy northern isles.

Was Britain Rome's Treasure House?

Ancient Britain seems to have been the treasure trove for Rome since thousands of gold and silver artifacts dating to Roman times have been found there. Now a Welsh archaeologist thinks he knows why.

Iron Age Survivor

Would you have been voted off the Iron Age island? The BBC's History Trail lets players try their skills at a number of Iron Age survival skills.

MIT & MythBusters Take on Archimedes' "Death Ray"

After the failure of Jamie and Adam to reconstruct a working model of Archimedes' death ray for Mythbusters, scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have taken up the challenge.

Hannibal v. Rome

On Sunday October 30, 2005, the National Geographic Channel will present Hannibal v Rome a two-hour epic story of "an African warrior who would dare to challenge the impossible and shape the course of human history."

Brading Roman Villa Yields "Amazing Finds"

Archaeologist Kevin Trott is excited about recent excavations at Brading Roman Villa on England's Isle of Wight. His 400-page report dispells long-held myths and may "take the archaeological world by storm."

Claterna Emerges from the Italian Soil

After being buried for 1500 years, the Roman town of Claterna, bear Bologna, Italy, has begun to emerge from the soil. Excavations have already revealed patrician houses, metalworking sites and mosaic paving, as well as pottery and coins.

Kilts from Togas?

What did the Romans do for Scotland? Allan Burnett looks at the Roman legacy in the country from the Battle of Mons Graupius to the 3rd century, including an observation that the idea for the kilt may have come from the Roman toga.

National Geographic: Ancient Chinese Noodle Secret?

John Roach, reporting for National Geographic, writes that 4,000-year-old noodles, the oldest ever found, have been discovered in northwestern China. The well-preserved, thin noodles were buried in a bowl ten feet below ground.

Origin of White British Cattle Still a Mystery

A rare and mysterious breed of white British cattle has been traced to the Bronze Age where there were an important part of pre-Roman pagan rituals, but how the cattle came to Britain is still a mystery.

Homer's Ithaca Found?

British amateur archaeologist Robert Bittlestone believes he has found the location of Odysseus' fabled Ithaca as part of the Greek island of Cephalonia.

Iron Age Woman Found in Denmark

The skeletal remains of an Iron Age woman have been discovered in an ancient grave site near Copenhagen, Denmark. Believed to be from the 5th century, the woman was buried with her jewelry.

Lavish Byzantine Mansion to Open in Caesarea

Israel's Antiquities Authority has announced that the archaeological remains of a Byzantine mansion, complete with mosaic floors, have been excavated in the coastal city of Caesarea and will be open to the public.

The Return of Asterix

Fans of the Asterix comic book series will be glad to know that the first book in four years will be released in October 2005. The Sky Falls On His Head is the 33rd book in the series, which features the escapades of the Gallic warrior with the yellow moustache.

6th Century Mosaic to Remain in Gaza

Israeli authorities have abandoned plans to remove a 6th century Byzantine mosaic from the Gaza Strip.