601 CE and Earlier

Ancient Glass Documentation Online

Gina (Lila Richards) of the Kingdom of Lochac reports that a guide to the Ancient Glass Collection at Yale University is available in PDF format online.

Recreating Roman Cosmetics

A Roman reenactor and museum manager gave a demonstration of Roman cosmetics at a Roman "military spectacular" in Wales earlier this month.

Roman Road to Nowhere

Peddars Way near Thetford in west Norfolk, England, was built by the Romans 2,000 years ago and appears to lead nowhere. Archaeologists are now searching for clues to a destination, such as a fort, which would make construction of the road logical.

Dorset Kitchen Renovation Unearths Roman Floor

Restaurant owner Luciano Tombolani discovered much more than he bargained for when he authorized the renovation of a kitchen for his Italian restaurant: a mosaic Roman floor.

New Discoveries Give Insight into Basque Language

The recent discovery of inscriptions in the Basque language dating to the 3rd century has researchers excited. Considered one of the oldest European languages, Basque has been linked to African, Caucasian or Etruscan tongues or thought to have developed on its own.

"Tropical Stonehenge" Found in Amazon Rainforest

Scientists have uncovered a ring of stones in the Amazon jungle near Sao Paulo, Brazil, that they are calling the "Tropical Stonehenge."

250,000 year-old handaxes found in Britain

Near Cuxton in Kent, archaeologists have found stone axes more than a quarter million years old and bearing craftsmanship exceeding the quality of that previously found from such an early time period.

Welsh Field Holds Roman Treasure

A hoard of over 2,000 Roman coins of the late period has been discovered in a Welsh field. The treasure was found a mere 12 inches below the surface.

Vita vinum est (Wine is Life)

Romans loved their wine, loved talking about it — and writing about it. An article for CentreDaily.com focuses on the history and sources for study of Roman wine.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 19, 325

The Emperor Constantine convened the first Council of Nicea on June 19, 325.

Archers Helped Colonize the World

In a recent paper, archaeologist and Cambridge professor Paul Mellars suggests that the technological development of the bow and arrow helped lead to human colonization of the world.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 11, 1186

The Lady Chapel of Glastonbury Abbey was consecrated on June 11, 1186.

Boudicca's Burial Site Found?

Archaeologists are pondering whether or not a burial site discovered near a McDonald's restaurant in Birmingham, England may be that of warrior queen Boudicca.

Joint Greek-Bulgarian Project to Recreate Dionysian Temple

Greece and Bulgaria will work together on a European Union-funded project to restore the ancient Perperikon, a Thracian sanctuary to Dionysus.

Unprecedented Brooch Find near Hadrian's Wall

A remarkable brooch, probably the property of a very senior Roman legionary, has been discovered in Northumberland. The object is outstanding for its size and workmanship and also because it is marked with two personal names.

Terry Jones Seeks to Bust the Barbarian Myth

Ex-Pythoner Terry Jones hopes to dispell the myth of barbarism in his new book Terry Jones' Barbarians. The London Times provides a preview.

Large Roman Cemetery Found in Gloucestershire

A large Roman cemetery, containing at least 100 skeletons, has been discovered near Fairford in Gloucestershire, England.

Boooooooo!

Sonia Smith of Slate magazine looks at the origins of heckling from the ancient Greeks to medieval hooters.

Tara Burial Unique in Irish Archaeology

A newly discovered burial site near Tara shows features not found in Ireland before.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 7, 558

On May 7, 558, the dome of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople collapsed after an earthquake.

Travel in Sardinia

Travel writer John Clarke writes about Sardinia. Along the way, visit ancient towns and medieval castles that "cling to mountain tops," the nuraghi (stone-built conical towers dating back to the 1500s), the neolithic necropolis of Bonorvo which dates back to 3500-2700 B.C. and the Spanish ruins of Burgos.

Roman Pottery Find in Back Yard

A homeowner in Cardiff, Wales discovered a trove of Roman pottery while digging in his garden.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 25, c. 451

April 25 is both the traditional date for the founding of Venice and the holy day of St. Mark, the city's patron saint.

Asterix to Conquer Big Screen

Fans of Asterix, the pint-sized warrior of ancient Gaul, will be glad to learn that the hero will be coming to the big screen in a UK£15M film by Danish director Stefan Fjeldmark.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 20, 161

The Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius was born on April 20, 161 CE.

Iron Age Roundhouse Discovered in West Yorkshire

The remains of a 2,000-year-old Dotterill roundhouse were discovered recently by workers excavating for a village bypass. The site is near Bridlington, England.

Headless Bodies in York Cemetery Gladiators?

Researchers have suggested that the remains discovered in a Roman cemetery in York, England might be those of gladiators. The bodies were all of tall, strong men, and all were headless.

6th Century Pyramid Found under Mexican Passion Play Site

As many as a million Mexicans have watched an annual reenactment of the crucifixion of Christ unaware that a pyramid of the Teotihuacan culture lay under the soil on which they stood.

Huge Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Britain

The discovery of 600 copper, Roman coins has British archaeologists buzzing. The hoard, found in Suffolk, England, is thought to be the largest stash of legitimately-minted coins ever found in the country.

Hannibal to Conquer the Silver Screen

Action hero Vin Diesel plans to direct and star in a film trilogy based on the life of Carthaginian hero Hannibal.