601 CE and Earlier

6th Century Pyramid Found under Mexican Passion Play Site

As many as a million Mexicans have watched an annual reenactment of the crucifixion of Christ unaware that a pyramid of the Teotihuacan culture lay under the soil on which they stood.

Huge Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Britain

The discovery of 600 copper, Roman coins has British archaeologists buzzing. The hoard, found in Suffolk, England, is thought to be the largest stash of legitimately-minted coins ever found in the country.

Hannibal to Conquer the Silver Screen

Action hero Vin Diesel plans to direct and star in a film trilogy based on the life of Carthaginian hero Hannibal.

Roman Demographics Studied by Modern Foreign Policy Experts

Philip Longman, writing in Foreign Policy Magazine, uses Roman military strategies and demographics to understand modern policy decisions.

Romano-British Good Luck Charm Found

Archaeologists working near Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland, England, have discovered a stone carving of what is believed to be the god Cocidius, a Romano-British warrior god, used for protection and good luck.

WWII Bunkers Hide Roman Ruins

Archeologists believe that a wartime bunker in the city of York, England, may hide the ruins of a Roman palace.

The Mystery of Scotland's Brochs

Archaeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones looks at Scotland's 2,000-year-old stone towers known as brochs, which were built by master builders for the purpose of defense.

Early Coptic Manuscript Found in Egypt

A cache of 6th century Coptic manuscripts has been discovered at the Monastery of Deir al-Surian in western Egypt. The find includes a single completed manuscript and hundreds of fragments from the 6th through 10th centuries CE.

Bronze Age Cairn Links Wales and Scotland

A Welsh burial mound from the Bronze Age reveals links to northern Scotland. Clues show that burial customs were similar to those in the Orkneys and Perthshire in Scotland.

Germanic Weapons Found in Czech Town

A treasure trove of Germanic weapons dating to the 2nd century C.E. have been discovered near the Bohemian town of Chomutov. The 22 rusty iron shield handles and sword tips were discovered by a hiker who found them "uncovered in a quiet grove."

New Light on Prasutagus, Husband of Boudica

New research shows that Prasutagus, husband of the warrior queen Boudica, may have been more powerful than previously believed.

New Road Plans for Stonehenge

The controversy continues. English Heritage is still working on options to remove traffic from the area around Stonehenge, this time with five different options.

Forensic research reveals gladiators fought by the rules

Despite the Roman arena's well-deserved reputation for gladiatorial brutality, forensic examination of the remains of several dozen gladiators found in Turkey reveals that their combat was fought with well-defined rules of engagement.

Neolithic Dairy Farming

The discovery of cheese and yogurt in 8,000-year-old pots proves to researchers that neolithic Europeans practiced dairy farming. The pots were found during separate studies in Romania, Hungary and Switzerland.

Stairway, Sphinx Found at Hadrian's Villa

A monumental staircase and marble statue of a sphinx have been discovered in the Gymnasium area of Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, north of Rome. The statue is believed to have originated in Egypt.

Roman Mosaics Depict Jewish Life

An exhibit of Roman floor mosaics at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York gives insight into Jewish life around the Mediterranean in the late Roman period. Depicting scenes and symbols from Judaism, some mosaics also included Latin inscriptions.

Valentine's Day: Love in the Classic Style

In celebration of Valentine's Day, Hamilton College Classics Professor Barbara Gold offers opinions on modern versus classical love.

Byzantine Discoveries Could Jeopardize Turkish Tunnel Plans

The recent discovery of the original port of Constantinople on the banks of the Bosporus may throw a monkey wrench into Turkey's ambitious plan to construct a UK£2 billion train tunnel linking Europe to Asia.

Roman Villa Discovery Thanks to Moles

Archaeologists are crediting moles with the discovery of a Roman villa in the British Cotswold area when their digging unearthed mosaic tiles.

Scotland, China or Rome? Who Invented Golf?

Recent research has suggested that the Chinese played a form of golf in the 10th century. Now archaeologists claim that paganica, a Roman version of golf, existed as early as 30 B.C.E.

The Legacy of St. Augustine

In a speech delivered to the American Enterprise Institute, Robert Louis Wilken of the University of Virginia, looks at the legacy of Augustine, thinker and writer.

Key to ancestry: The true father of Ireland

One in 12 Irishmen are descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, a fifth century warlord, according to research by geneticists at Trinity College Dublin.

Roman Lattice-work panties and Coa Vestis in progress

This thread explores the creation and wearing of the filmy Coa Vestis, and Roman Lattice-work panties.

Hopefully, this helps to prove that Roman garb wasn't meant to be made from old bedsheets or broadcloth; the site attempts to bring awareness to the fact that Roman garb can be quite sensual and interesting, when done right, researched properly, and worn with dignity.

Just because Roman garb is generally easy to make does not mean it's easy to wear! (The Greeks, after all, had slaves that attended to the sole function of properly draping the master's clothing.)

Irish Bog Men Reveal Surprises

BBC radio interview with Ned Kelly, head of antiquities at the National Museum of Ireland reveals that "The preserved remains of two prehistoric men discovered in an Irish bog have revealed a couple of surprises --- one used hair gel and the other stood 6 foot 6 inches high, the tallest Iron Age body discovered."

Were Roman Builders Influenced by Great Wall?

Visy Zsolt, a professor of Archaeology at the University of Pecs in Hungary, believes that the construction of the Roman Limes may have been influenced by the Great Wall of China.

Skimpy Civvy Adorns G-String Gladiator

Divers working on a river site near a Roman fortress in England have discovered a bit of pottery depicting the rear portions of a g-string clad gladiator.

A Very PC Holiday!

Diane Roberts of NPR's Weekend Edition offered a very politically correct holiday greeting on Sunday, December 18, 2005 with a look at the winter holiday season, ancient Roman style.

Lost City Uncovered Under Syrian Desert

On the border between Syria and Iraq, archaeological excavation has uncovered the remains of a settlement from the fifth millenium BCE.

Newport Ship Skeleton Theory

A skeleton found under the Newport Ship could have belonged to a man who was decapitated in a sacrificial killing, a leading archaeologist working on the project says. But there is also the possibility that he met his end in the waters of the River Usk by drowning.

Skeleton Discovered Under 15th Century Ship is Much Older

Experts examining an Iron Age skeleton found discovered buried beneath a medieval ship in Newport, South Wales, say it is "remarkably well preserved." Tests on the bones by forensic archaeologists at Lampeter University, Mid Wales, have shown that they date back to 170 B.C.