601 CE and Earlier

Undead Mummies Endangered by Modern Crowding

The Onion reports on factors diminishing the numbers of walking mummies traditionally found among Egyptian tombs.

Today in the Middle Ages: Christmas Legends

In addition to the birth of Jesus, Christmas Day is associated with many other period beliefs and tales.

Egyptian Diversity Reached Top of Society

Ethnic diversity in ancient Egypt appears to have existed in all levels of society, even the highest.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre Still Under Debate

Representatives from local government and English Heritage are meeting for a two-week public inquiry on the fate of the proposed visitor centre for Stonehenge. The controversial centre would be built two miles from the monument.

Saint Paul's Tomb Found?

Archaeologists in Rome believe that they have discovered the tomb of St. Paul the Apostle. A sarcophagus, which may contain the remains of the saint, was unearthed at the St. Paul Outside the Walls basilica.

Palatine Hill excavation in Rome yields artifacts from deposed Emperor

The Emperor Maxentius was defeated by Constantine I in a battle in the year 321 C.E., but his followers apparently concealed his scepter, ceremonial weapons, and other regalia from Constantine's forces by burying the items. Archaeologists excavating Palatine Hill in Rome have located the cache, which is notable for the condition of the objects.

Evidence of Norsemen in the Roman Legions

"It is a well known fact that people from so called barbaric tribes like the German tribes up north, were recruited into the Roman legions." Now, new finds in Norway demonstrate that the northern lands had closer ties to the Roman Empire than previously believed.

Burial Site Discovery Pushes Back Date of Christianity in Britain

A Christian grave discovered near St-Martin-in-the-Fields Church, London, indicates that Christianity may have come to Albion much earlier than previously supposed.

Curse Tablet Expands Knowledge of Roman Britain

Archaelogists from the University of Leicester have found a fragment of lead that greatly adds to their knowledge of the city's Roman past. The "curse tablet" bears a list of 18 names; until now, only a few names of Roman residents of the city were known.

"Explore Roman Britain" Online

The University of Oxford (England) has announced that an online, continuing education program entitled Exploring Roman Britain is now accepting students.

Scientists at last understand ancient calculating device

After many years of study, scientists at last can fathom the works of a calculating device from ancient Greece, which some researchers consider more valuable than the Mona Lisa due to its unique historical value.

Roman Coins Offered to Placate the Gods?

Archaeologists working near the city of Cuijk in the Netherlands have discovered a cache of 3rd century Roman coins and other treasures, apparently as an offering at the spot where a bolt of lightning had struck.

Early Byzantine Costume Research Papers Online

Meghan Elphinstone, Arts & Sciences Champion for the Barony of Marinus in Atlantia, has posted her extensive research on early Byzantine costuming. The two papers are available in PDF format.

"The 300" Chronicles Spartans Battle at Thermopylae

In March 2007, 300 will open in theatres. The movie, based on a graphic novel by Frank Miller (Sin City), chronicles the Spartans at the Battle of Thermopylae, when 300 Spartans led an army of 5,000 against the Persian army of two million and held them off for a week.

Hunt for Roman Fish Sauce Recipe in Shipwreck

More than 1,200 tall (1m) jars have been discovered in a Roman first century shipwreck. Scientists are hoping that any remaining sealed jars will provide them with samples of the fish sauce for analysis.

Early Horse Domestication Evidence in Kazahkstan

Evidence from soil suggests that people were relying on domesticated horses for survival more than 5,000 years ago.

Political Ads of Ancient Rome

"The mid-term campaigns have offered up perhaps the most venomous volleys of political advertising in U.S. history....Yet as Americans ponder how much of it is true and how much pure vindictive blather, we might note that we're rather backward compared to the pointed, frank and refreshingly honest political ads of the Romans more than 1,900 years ago."

Mosaics Highlight Roman Villa Discovery

Archaeologists have discovered "evidence of a substantial Roman villa with a mosaic floor in the main room" in the Quantock Hills of Somerset, England. The site is one of the most westerly Roman villas yet found in England.

Castra Romana: Pompeii, The Day Before Vesuvius

On February 2-4, 2007, Vesuvius will errupt all over again...well, almost. Castra Romana-Pompeii, a Roman Era Re-enactment, will hold an event recreating the day before the catastrophic events of August 24, 79 C.E.

Kent Gets Bronze Age Cup Back

A Bronze Age cup found in Kent by a metal detector enthusiast will return to the county on loan from the British Museum. The Ringlemere Gold Cup is one of only seven from the period found in Britain.

4th Century Roman Coins Spill Out in Kent

A hoard of over 3,000 late Roman coins "made a sound like tinkling glass" when they poured from an overturned pot recently unearthed by archaeologists on a dig in Kent, England. The treasure is valued at over UK£10,000.

In the Beginning: Bibles Before the Year 1000

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., in association with the Bodleian Library, will present In the Beginning: Bibles Before the Year 1000.

Domesticated Animals of the Iron Age

A British website offers an historic view of the breeds of animals which shared their lives with Iron Age people. These included sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, horses and fowl. The article includes photos of these breeds' ancestors.

Nano-Grecian Formula One?

New research by French scientists seems to suggest that the techniques used by Greeks and Romans to dye their hair had results in common with today's nanotechnology and were comparable to modern products.

What the Romans Did to Wales

British interest in Rome, especially in how it affected Britain, is on the increase with the broadcast of Ancient Rome - The Rise and Fall of an Empire on BBC1. An article on IC Wales discusses Roman/Welsh history.

War 2, Archaeology 0

Recent bombing and a resulting oil spill in Lebanon have damaged two World Heritage sites, says an inspection team from UNESCO. Roman remains at Tyre and a medieval tower at Byblos are in urgent need of repair.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 28, 551 BCE

September 28, 551 BCE is the traditional date for the birthday of Confucius (K'ung-fu-tzu). Although not a medieval figure, Confucius exercised a profound influence over the subsequent development of Chinese culture in all periods.

New Claim for Authenticity of Shroud of Turin

Australian researcher Brendan Whiting feels he has evidence that can prove that the Shroud of Turin dates to the time of Christ. Whiting published his findings in a new book, The Shroud Story.

"Totally Unique" Roman Bathhouse Discovered in Kent, England

Archaeologists working on a Roman dig in Kent, England are enthusiastic about the remains of a 5th century Roman bath, calling it "totally unique" for the county.

Roman Ink

An unlikely exhibition exploring the history of tattoos in Britain has opened at Newcastle University's Museum of Antiquities. The exhibition includes archaeological evidence of military tattoos among the Roman soldiers at Hadrian's Wall.