601 CE and Earlier

Castra Romana: Pompeii, The Day Before Vesuvius

On February 2-4, 2007, Vesuvius will errupt all over again...well, almost. Castra Romana-Pompeii, a Roman Era Re-enactment, will hold an event recreating the day before the catastrophic events of August 24, 79 C.E.

Kent Gets Bronze Age Cup Back

A Bronze Age cup found in Kent by a metal detector enthusiast will return to the county on loan from the British Museum. The Ringlemere Gold Cup is one of only seven from the period found in Britain.

4th Century Roman Coins Spill Out in Kent

A hoard of over 3,000 late Roman coins "made a sound like tinkling glass" when they poured from an overturned pot recently unearthed by archaeologists on a dig in Kent, England. The treasure is valued at over UK£10,000.

In the Beginning: Bibles Before the Year 1000

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C., in association with the Bodleian Library, will present In the Beginning: Bibles Before the Year 1000.

Domesticated Animals of the Iron Age

A British website offers an historic view of the breeds of animals which shared their lives with Iron Age people. These included sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, horses and fowl. The article includes photos of these breeds' ancestors.

Nano-Grecian Formula One?

New research by French scientists seems to suggest that the techniques used by Greeks and Romans to dye their hair had results in common with today's nanotechnology and were comparable to modern products.

What the Romans Did to Wales

British interest in Rome, especially in how it affected Britain, is on the increase with the broadcast of Ancient Rome - The Rise and Fall of an Empire on BBC1. An article on IC Wales discusses Roman/Welsh history.

War 2, Archaeology 0

Recent bombing and a resulting oil spill in Lebanon have damaged two World Heritage sites, says an inspection team from UNESCO. Roman remains at Tyre and a medieval tower at Byblos are in urgent need of repair.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 28, 551 BCE

September 28, 551 BCE is the traditional date for the birthday of Confucius (K'ung-fu-tzu). Although not a medieval figure, Confucius exercised a profound influence over the subsequent development of Chinese culture in all periods.

New Claim for Authenticity of Shroud of Turin

Australian researcher Brendan Whiting feels he has evidence that can prove that the Shroud of Turin dates to the time of Christ. Whiting published his findings in a new book, The Shroud Story.

"Totally Unique" Roman Bathhouse Discovered in Kent, England

Archaeologists working on a Roman dig in Kent, England are enthusiastic about the remains of a 5th century Roman bath, calling it "totally unique" for the county.

Roman Ink

An unlikely exhibition exploring the history of tattoos in Britain has opened at Newcastle University's Museum of Antiquities. The exhibition includes archaeological evidence of military tattoos among the Roman soldiers at Hadrian's Wall.

Odyssey Written by a Woman?

Bearded statues aside, one scholar now believes that the epic poems the Iliad and the Odyssey were probably written by a woman.

CSI Needed for Roman Crime?

An archaeological team working near Sedgeford,England may need the help of criminal investigators to solve a 1500-year-old mystery: was the skeleton found pushed into the oven of a Roman farm murdered?

Roman Village Found Near Bonn, Germany

Archaeologists working near Bonn, Germany have found the remains of a Roman village complete with baths.

Good Grooming Shows in Irish Bog People

A study of Irish bog burials shows that the well-preserved bodies were well-groomed at the time of their internment, with manicured fingernails and gelled hair.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 24, 410 C.E.

On August 24, 410, King Alaric the Goth sacked Rome. This event is sometimes regarded as the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Ancient Glass Documentation Online

Gina (Lila Richards) of the Kingdom of Lochac reports that a guide to the Ancient Glass Collection at Yale University is available in PDF format online.

Recreating Roman Cosmetics

A Roman reenactor and museum manager gave a demonstration of Roman cosmetics at a Roman "military spectacular" in Wales earlier this month.

Roman Road to Nowhere

Peddars Way near Thetford in west Norfolk, England, was built by the Romans 2,000 years ago and appears to lead nowhere. Archaeologists are now searching for clues to a destination, such as a fort, which would make construction of the road logical.

Dorset Kitchen Renovation Unearths Roman Floor

Restaurant owner Luciano Tombolani discovered much more than he bargained for when he authorized the renovation of a kitchen for his Italian restaurant: a mosaic Roman floor.

New Discoveries Give Insight into Basque Language

The recent discovery of inscriptions in the Basque language dating to the 3rd century has researchers excited. Considered one of the oldest European languages, Basque has been linked to African, Caucasian or Etruscan tongues or thought to have developed on its own.

"Tropical Stonehenge" Found in Amazon Rainforest

Scientists have uncovered a ring of stones in the Amazon jungle near Sao Paulo, Brazil, that they are calling the "Tropical Stonehenge."

250,000 year-old handaxes found in Britain

Near Cuxton in Kent, archaeologists have found stone axes more than a quarter million years old and bearing craftsmanship exceeding the quality of that previously found from such an early time period.

Welsh Field Holds Roman Treasure

A hoard of over 2,000 Roman coins of the late period has been discovered in a Welsh field. The treasure was found a mere 12 inches below the surface.

Vita vinum est (Wine is Life)

Romans loved their wine, loved talking about it — and writing about it. An article for CentreDaily.com focuses on the history and sources for study of Roman wine.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 19, 325

The Emperor Constantine convened the first Council of Nicea on June 19, 325.

Archers Helped Colonize the World

In a recent paper, archaeologist and Cambridge professor Paul Mellars suggests that the technological development of the bow and arrow helped lead to human colonization of the world.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 11, 1186

The Lady Chapel of Glastonbury Abbey was consecrated on June 11, 1186.

Boudicca's Burial Site Found?

Archaeologists are pondering whether or not a burial site discovered near a McDonald's restaurant in Birmingham, England may be that of warrior queen Boudicca.