601 CE and Earlier

Lincoln aqueduct was functional Roman water source

Archaeologists working on the Lincoln aqueduct in England now believe that underground water source was actually used by the Romans. For centuries it was believed that the aqueduct was built but never used by the Romans.

Roman fort destroyed by modern construction team

The Daily Express reports that the Roman fort at Caister, near Yarmouth, England, along with hundreds of artifacts, was destroyed when permission was given for builders to excavate on an archaeological site.

Roman house found in Cotswold gravel pit

A 4th century Roman home has been discovered during excavation of a gravel pit near Stow-onthe-Wold, England. The house is believed to have been the "big farm house" of a Roman settlement.

Proper Latin pronunciation

In an article for Great Britain's The Oldie, Peter Jones "gets to the Bottom of How Julius Caesar really spoke", to the ire of some traditionalists.

Study claims "dead languages" detrimental to modern language learning

A recent "secret report" by the Dearing Languages Review in Great Britain warns that the study of ancient languages may be detrimental to the study of modern languages because they "contribute nothing to 'intercultural understanding'."

Easter Island archaeologists conclude statues are petrified peeps

Archaeologists working at Easter Island have determined that the large statues are not volcanic rock, as once believed, but are, in fact, petrified peeps. Says project head Rock Newton, "Yes, we have verified that the statues are actually petrified Easter candy."

Ready, set go: starting gates from Colchester's Roman Circus found

Twelve starting gates from the Roman Circus at Colchester, England have been discovered by archaeologists who have been working on the site since 2004. The gates operated like "greyhound traps, unleashing the charioteers on to the quarter-mile long opening stretch of the track."

Scholar believes St. Patrick in Ireland earlier than 5th century

Celtic scholar and linguist Daniel Melia believes that St. patrick may have preached his message to the Irish 50 years earlier than previously believed. The earlier time period would place the saint within provincial Roman society rather than during tribal invasions.

Merovingian treasures displayed in Russia

The Pushkin Museum of Fine art in Russia will display a collection of Merovingian artifacts. The museum is located in Moscow.

Roman village discovered in Wiltshire

Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, England may contain more than a Neolithic mound. It may also be the site of a first century Roman village. "English Heritage geophysicist Dr Neil Linford said: 'We are really excited by this discovery because we had no idea that a Roman village of such a size lay this close to Silbury Hill.'"

6th century book restored in Ethiopia

In an article for the Spring 2007 issue of Skin Deep, a publication for bookbinders, Mark Winstanley discusses Tsbook [Tigrinya for Good] - The Gospel of Abba, a 6th century Ethiopian Gospel and its repair project.

View of ancient Britons changed by discovery of Roman coin

The discovery of a 2nd century BCE coin in Cornwall may change how pre-Roman Britons are viewed. The pre-Roman Republic silver coin proves that active trading took place with the inhabitants of Britain before Rome conquered the island.

Lost Stonehenge altar stone found

Archaeologist Dennis Price believes he has located the lost altar stone from Stonehenge. First identified in the 17th century, the stone by architect Inigo Jones, the altar may now lie, in two sections, along a Wiltshire village road.

Roman burial ground a surprise for Lincolnshire archaeologists

Water company workers in Lincolnshire, England were surprised recently to uncover a very large Roman cemetery dating to the 1st century CE. So far the graves have yielded artifacts as well as 30 skeletons.

Stonehenge village archaeologist interviewed

Australia's ABC Radio National recently broadcast an interview with Mike Parker Pearson, one of the archaeologists who discovered the ancient settlement near Stonehenge. Stephanie Kennedy conducts the interview. (Transcript and podcast available)

The truth about Cleopatra's good looks.

A silver denarius minted in 32 B.C. shows that the fabled image of Cleopatra is not what she really looked like.

York grave holds Roman murder victim

Archaeologists working on a large Roman cemetery in York, England have discovered, among the remains of wealthy and poor alike, the bones of a murder victim. "She was stabbed seven times in the throat from the front," said Osteo-archaeologist Malin Holst.

SCA Bard Publishes In-Persona Stories

G.R. Groves joined the SCA over a decade ago, and her experiences in that organization and her travels abroad inspired her to write a first-person fictional account of the travels of a Welsh Bard in the Middle Ages. The book has now been published online and in print.

Spend a day in Pompeii

From June 27, 2007 until January 6, 2008, visitors to the Science Museum of Minnesota are invited to spend "A Day in Pompeii." The exhibit extolls "the rich culture, spirituality, and day-to-day customs of the people of ancient Pompeii."

Emperor Hadrian slept here!

Producers of the BBC's Timewatch program are hoping to prove that the Roman emperor Hadrian once stayed near his stone creation. This summer, archaeologists will dig along Hadrian's Wall looking for evidence of why the wall was built and where the Emperor might have stayed.

Roman army knife

One of the artifacts at the Fitzwilliam Museum is a Roman army knife dating to the 3rd or 4th century. Unlike modern Swiss army knives, this one appears to have been used mainly as an eating utensil.

Rome: Upstairs Downstairs with swords!

In an article for Newsweek, Malcolm Jones looks at the second season of the HBO series Rome.

Marriage, divorce and whiskey in Ireland

The February 2007 issue of the Chivalry Sports online newsletter includes two new articles: Marriage and Divorce Laws in Early Medieval Ireland and A recipe for Irish Whiskey Cake.

Volunteers needed for Pompei summer project

Archaeologists working for the Pompeii Food and Drink Project are looking for volunteers to work on the site in June and July 2007. The work will consist of documenting storage buildings and organizing the massive amount of information collected.

Village related to Stonehenge found

A major prehistoric village has been unearthed near Stonehenge in southern England. Stonehenge didn't stand alone, excavations show, recent excavations of Salisbury Plain in southern England have revealed at least two other large stone formations close by the world-famous prehistoric monument.

Stonehenge link to other ancient sites

Archaeologists Colin Richards of Manchester University and Joshua Pollard of Bristol University have a new theory on Stonehenge: it not isolated but stood as the link between a ritual burial mound and a timber circle.

Thousands of historical treasures found in German mud

Constructions workers in Cologne, Germany have discovered a 3rd century stone tablet dedicated to the god Jupiter. The tablet is just one of over 10,000 artifacts unearthed from the construction site.

1500-year-old sword found in Taiwan

Archaeologists at the Southern Taiwan Science Park in Tainan, Taiwan, have discovered what they believe to be the country's oldest sword.

Pink city of Petra hopes to become 7th Wonder

Jordanians are hoping that their prized ancient city of Petra will be chosen as one of the 7 Wonders of the World on July 7, 2007. Rediscovered in the 19th century, the city, built by the Nabateans, was last inhabited in the 8th century CE.

New Medieval Views of Stonehenge

This new view of Stonehenge is a tiny Medieval drawing in the "scala mundi" or "world ladder" on a chart which chronicles Creation. While not the oldest image of Stonehenge, it one of only a few known to exist.