601 CE and Earlier

Early Mexicans liked spicy food

Science Daily reports that chili peppers dating from between 490 and 780 C.E. have been discovered in a cave in Oaxaca Mexico. Experts believe that the plants were cultivated and used in early Mexican cuisine.

Roman farmers leave agricultural legacy

Archaeologists working in the Tron­çais forest of France have discovered over 100 Roman settlements, the legacy of which continue to affect the ecology of the area.

2,400 Year-Old Royal Mask Found in Bulgaria

Archaeologists in the village of Topolchane, Bulgaria have unearthed artifacts of gold, silver and pottery dating back to the 4th century B.C.E., including a golden mask.

The life of a gladiator

What Hollywood didn't tell you! In an article for Cosmos reporter Hilary Jones looks at the lives of the gladiators using evidence from recent discoveries.

Researcher believes Holy Grail still in Rome

Italian archaeologist Alfredo Barbagallo believes that the holy cup of Christ never left the city of Rome and is buried beneath the Basilica of San Lorenzo Fuori le Mura.

Celts for kids

MrDonn.org has a website to teach kids about Celtic history and life, from who they were to how they celebrated, the structures they built, and their religion.

Experience ancient Rome in 3D

A team of international technology experts has created the world's biggest computer simulation, a model of the city of Rome at the time of the Emperor Constantine.

Domestic life in ancient Pompeii

A recent study of family life in the buried Roman city of Pompeii shows that residents lived a resourceful domestic life without gadgets. A new study by archaeologist Penelope Allison of the University of Leicester digs into the unglamorous side of Roman life.

6th century European discovered in Chinese tomb

Chinese archaeologists have discovered the 1,400-year-old remains of a European man in a tomb in central China. The burial proves that cultural mixing was farther east than experts previously believed.

Spartans on a plane

OK, it's out of our time period and politically-incorrect in so many ways, but oh, is it funny! 300 Spartans on a Plane!

Scientists Study Why No Unicorns Exist

Scientists at the John Innes Centre and the University of Calgary asked "Why are there no unicorns?" To answer the question, they are studying the evolutionary biology of flower branching displays.

Using Science to Authenticate Lost Gospel of Judas

The National Geographic Society, the Maecenas Foundation for Ancient Art and the Waitt Institute for Historical Discovery have been working together "to authenticate, conserve, and translate a 66-page...codex."

Skeleton found in Trafalgar Square

Skeletal remains discovered recently in London's Trafalgar Square have not triggered the British equivalent of CSI. The remains are of a wealthy Roman man who was buried in the 5th century beneath what is now the busy city center.

Life of luxury in Roman forts

Recent excavations of a Roman fort on Tyneside have revealed that some centurions led a life of relative luxury with indoor plumbing, painted walls and comfortable furniture.

Tomb of King Herod found

For several decades, Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer has been looking for the tomb of King Herod. Now he believes he has found it at Herodium, a flattened hilltop in the Judean Desert.

Star Wars mythology finds roots in ancient Greek and Roman tales

Carl Rubino, a classic professor at Hamilton College, feels that classical themes are the basis for the popular Star Wars movies, a concept he explains in an upcoming History Channel documentary Star Wars: Legacy.

Earliest dental prosthesis found in Roman grave

Archaeologists have discovered in the grave of an unidentified Roman woman a gold wire used to hold together a set of artificial teeth. The dental prosthesis is believed to be the earliest such device ever discovered.

The story of a flea

In a review for The Guardian, Ian Pindar discusses a new book about bubonic plague: Justinian's Flea by William Rosen, an "impressive study of the bubonic plague and its impact on history."

2,700-Year-Old Fabric Found in Greece

Archaeologists in Greece have discovered a rare 2,700-year-old piece of fabric inside a copper urn from a burial they speculated imitated the elaborate cremation of soldiers described in Homer's "Iliad."

Celtic temple discovered near Tara

In an interview with Conor Newman, an archaeology professor at the National University of Ireland, Galway, Melissa Block of NPR's All Things Considered learns about the recent discovery of a celtic temple near Ireland's Tara.

Work of Aristotle, Archimedes Discovered Behind 10th-12th Century Manuscript

Writings by the Greek philosopher Aristotle have been discovered on the Euchologion (or Archimedes Palimpsest) beneath the 10th-12th century prayers written upon the parchment.

4th century Roman remains discovered in Croatia

Roman remains and artifacts were discovered recently in Vinkovci during excavations to construct a new sports hall including a fibula, a Roman ornamental clip, dating to the 4th century C.E.

Gladiators' graveyard discovered

Scientists believe they have, for the first time, identified an ancient graveyard for gladiators. Analysis of the remains, found in Ephesus (in present-day Turkey), gives new insight into how they lived, fought, and died.

6th century embossing die found in Sweden

An amateur archaeologist working at a burial mound near Sättuna on the outskirts of Linköping, Sweden, has discovered a 6th century patrix, a die used to emboss gold, portraying "a woman who resembles a troll."

Lincoln aqueduct was functional Roman water source

Archaeologists working on the Lincoln aqueduct in England now believe that underground water source was actually used by the Romans. For centuries it was believed that the aqueduct was built but never used by the Romans.

Roman fort destroyed by modern construction team

The Daily Express reports that the Roman fort at Caister, near Yarmouth, England, along with hundreds of artifacts, was destroyed when permission was given for builders to excavate on an archaeological site.

Roman house found in Cotswold gravel pit

A 4th century Roman home has been discovered during excavation of a gravel pit near Stow-onthe-Wold, England. The house is believed to have been the "big farm house" of a Roman settlement.

Proper Latin pronunciation

In an article for Great Britain's The Oldie, Peter Jones "gets to the Bottom of How Julius Caesar really spoke", to the ire of some traditionalists.

Study claims "dead languages" detrimental to modern language learning

A recent "secret report" by the Dearing Languages Review in Great Britain warns that the study of ancient languages may be detrimental to the study of modern languages because they "contribute nothing to 'intercultural understanding'."

Easter Island archaeologists conclude statues are petrified peeps

Archaeologists working at Easter Island have determined that the large statues are not volcanic rock, as once believed, but are, in fact, petrified peeps. Says project head Rock Newton, "Yes, we have verified that the statues are actually petrified Easter candy."