601 CE and Earlier

Roman feast gear found in London well

A 4th century banqueting set which once belonged to a rich Roman family was discovered recently in a well during excavation in London. The set included 19 metal vessels. (photos)

New research project to illuminate "Dark Age" Scotland

The National Museums of Scotland are launching a new project to shed light on the so-called Dark Ages to educate people about the surprisingly sophisticated cultures of the Picts, Gaels, and Norse.

Pop culture breathes life into Latin

Popular movies, movie stars, and TV series such as Harry Potter, Angelina Jolie, and Star Trek are mainly entertainment, but they also have helped keep Latin in the public eye when it otherwise would be forgotten outside academia.

Roman-era synagogue found near Sea of Galilee

The remains of a late Roman-Byzantine-era synagogue have been discovered in the Arbel National Park near the Sea of Galilee. The building is thought to date from the 2nd to 4th century C.E.

Do-it-yourself Cuirass Lorica Musculata

Those interested in the re-creation of Roman armor will want to visit Anthony Congiano's website for a tutorial on creating a leather Cuirass Lorica Musculata.

Roman burial ground discovered in the Blacklands

The remains of four adults dating to the 1st century have been discovered in Staverton near Trowbridge, England. The area is known to locals as the Blacklands and is said to be haunted. (photo of Roman coin)

2nd century Roman street found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists have discovered a Roman street dating to the 2nd-4th centuries in the Western Wall tunnels of the city of Jerusalem. The side street is believed to have connected two major roads near Temple Mount.

Romulus and Remus cave found?

Italian archaeologists believe they have found the cave where, according to legend, a she-wolf nursed Romulus and Remus, the twin founders of Rome.

Roman tombstone found in Scotland

A red sandstone Roman Tombstone, the first Scottish example ever found, has been unearthed near Inveresk, Scotland proving "that Inveresk was a pivotal Roman site in northern Britain."

Roman theatre lives in the Colosseum

The Colosseum in Rome will be the site of a special exhibition of Roman theatre, hosting "statues, mosaics, painted vases and fragments of wall paintings depicting actors and their masks, dancing girls, musicians, acrobats and jugglers" in a display that will continue until February 17, 2008.

Blacksmith's house yields Roman treasure

Archaeologists working on a site near Coriscada in northeastern Portugal have discovered a hoard of over 4,000 coins dating to the 4th century inside the wall of the home of a Roman blacksmith.

Roman Copenhagen

Danish archaeologists have discovered a rare 4th century Roman cemetery near Copenhagen, Denmark. "It is something special and rare in Denmark to have so many (ancient Roman) graves in one place," said archaeologist Rune Iversen.

Early Christian Art showcased in Venice

An new exhibit, Early Christian Art Between Rome and Byzantium, will showcase over 90 works from twenty Italian museums at the Intesa San Paolo's Palazzo Leoni Montanari. The show runs until November 18, 2007.

Dating tips from Zeus, King of the Gods

In an April, 1999 issue of The Onion, Zeus, King of the Gods, offers dating tips on handling the ladies such as "Today's Women Don't Like It When You Come To Them As A Bull Or Swan."

Own an authentic Roman bath!

Have an extra UK£300,000? If so, you can purchase an authentic Roman bath house in the town of Battle, East Sussex, England built in the first century C.E. for officers in the Roman navy.

Ancient Roman map available online

The Peutingerian Map, thought to be the oldest surviving road map in the world, is now available for study on the Internet through collaboration between the Austrian National Library and Christos Nüssli of Euratlas.com.

Britain's oldest recipes

A recent study by the Food Science Department of the University of Wales Institute in Cardiff has revealed Great Britain's 10 oldest recipes, including hedgehog and haggis.

Palace of the Gauls shows surprising sophistication

Contrary to popular belief, the Gauls during the time of Julius Caesar may not have been the rough barbarians as depicted in the Asterix books but a civilized society whose leaders lived in palaces.

Gask Ridge Frontier played vital role in Roman Britain

Archaeologists working on the Gask Ridge Project in Scotland now believe that the fortification, which predates Hadrian's Wall by 50 years, was an important part of the Roman defense in northern Britain. The forts were later incorporated into the Antonine Wall.

3,000 year old beehives found in the Middle East

Archaeologists excavating the ruins of the city of Rehov, in northern Israel, have found thirty intact beehives and other apicultural artifacts dating to approximately 900 B.C.E.

Footprint in time

The footprint of a hobnailed sandal has caused quite a stir since it was discovered during work at the Roman city of Sussita, east of Lake Kinneret in Israel.

"Exquisitely carved" statue of Hadrian found in Turkey

A large statue of the Roman emperor Hadrian has been discovered by archaeologists from the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium) in Sagalassos, an ancient Greco-Roman city in south-central Turkey. (photos)

French fashion trend setters for 1400 years

A new study of clothing from Anglo Saxon graves by archaeologist Penelope Walton Rogers shows that most styles followed the customs set in northern France.

Byzantine mosaic found in Israel

An elaborately-decorated mosaic floor dating to the 6th century has been discovered near the Israeli city of Palmahim. The floor is thought to have belonged to the dining area of a Byzantine villa.

London deli hides elaborate Roman dining hall

London's building boom has also produced a boom for archaeologists by uncovering the city's Roman past. Recent finds include a 2nd century dining room decorated with plaster murals.

Pope permits examination of the tomb of St. Paul

Pope Benedict has given his permission to open a tomb believed to be that of the apostle Paul. The sarcophagus was rediscovered during excavations of the site in 2002 and 2003.

5-acre bath complex discovered in Rome

Archaeologists working in Rome have discovered a lavish, two-story Roman bath complex complete with "decorated hot rooms, vaults, changing rooms, marble latrines and an underground room where slaves lit the fire to warm the baths."

2,000-year-old Iron Age roundhouses may be washed away by storms

A team of archaeologists from St. Andrews University are battling against time to study Iron Age roundhouses on the Scottish island of North Uist. The structures were first exposed in 2005, and are now in danger of washing away in a storm.

Early Mexicans liked spicy food

Science Daily reports that chili peppers dating from between 490 and 780 C.E. have been discovered in a cave in Oaxaca Mexico. Experts believe that the plants were cultivated and used in early Mexican cuisine.

Roman farmers leave agricultural legacy

Archaeologists working in the Tron­çais forest of France have discovered over 100 Roman settlements, the legacy of which continue to affect the ecology of the area.