601 CE and Earlier

Rowing through Europe - Roman style

A YouTube video clip takes a look at the Navis Lusoria, a reconstruction of a late Roman period boat. (narration in German)

Museum offers virtual tour of Roman road

A new exhibit at the Museum of the Diocletian Baths in Rome lets visitors take a virtual walk down the Via Flaminia, a major travel artery which was "built in the third century B.C.E. to connect Rome to Ariminum, today's Rimini, on the Adriatic sea."

Roman bridge reconstructed in Northumberland

A 2nd century Roman bridge, which originally crossed the Tyne River in Northumberland, has been reconstructed on the river's bank. The original was one of the largest bridges in Roman Britain.

Holy Grail discovery claimed in the Louvre

Glasgow historian Mark Oxbrow believes he has found the real Holy Grail in - of all places - the Louvre in Paris. Oxbrow believes it is a "green gem-encrusted serving dish which he thinks could have been used at the Last Supper."

"Most significant piece of wooden furniture" found in Rome

A wooden and ivory throne, dating to the times of Julius Caesar, has been discovered in Herculaneum and is considered to be "the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there."

Emperor Valens cursed

Sometime in the 4th century, someone was REALLY cheesed off at the emperor — at least enough to curse him by defacing his image and wrapping lead around his face.

Bronze Age bunsen burners

Archaeologist Jacqui Wood may have discovered a form of Bronze Age lantern tops while doing research in Italy. The ceramic, pots full of strange holes and long thought to be cheese strainers, may have been, in fact, lantern covers or a sort of "medieval bunsen burner." (photos)

Important English historic site may be sold for preservation reasons

When members of the Northamptonshire County Council bought Chester Farm near Irchester several years ago, they never dreamed they might need to put the historic site up for sale to keep it from falling into disrepair, but now that may be necessary.

Roman glue still holds

Archaeologists are working to re-create a Roman "superglue" used to stick silver laurel leaves to legionnaires' battle helmets. Traces of the glue were discovered on iron helmets found near the German town of Xanten which were buried in river mud for more than 1500 years.

London Olympic construction uncovers Roman artifacts

The London Olympics may leave a lasting mark on the city's history. Recently, workers at the site of the new London stadium unearthed artifacts including a Roman coin dating to the 4th century.

Byzantine-era synagogue sheds light on Jewish life

Jewish scholars are having to rethink opinions about life and culture in early Byzantine times after the discovery of a 5th century synagogue, complete with elaborate mosaic floors.

Stonehenge tunnel plan scrapped

The fear that increased traffic might damage the historic site has led English Heritage to cancel a plan to build a tunnel under Stonehenge.

"Domus del Chirurgo" sheds light on Roman medicine

For the past 17 years, archaeologists have worked at the site of the Domus del Chirurgo, the House of the Surgeon, the home of a 2nd century Roman doctor in Rimini, Italy. Among the discoveries: "the largest find of surgical instruments anywhere."

Roman barge to be salvaged in Cologne

Portions of a Roman barge, dating to as early as the 2nd century C.E., will soon be removed from its muddy resting place according to archaeologists. It may well be the "oldest Roman transport vessel left in central Europe."

Roman feast gear found in London well

A 4th century banqueting set which once belonged to a rich Roman family was discovered recently in a well during excavation in London. The set included 19 metal vessels. (photos)

New research project to illuminate "Dark Age" Scotland

The National Museums of Scotland are launching a new project to shed light on the so-called Dark Ages to educate people about the surprisingly sophisticated cultures of the Picts, Gaels, and Norse.

Pop culture breathes life into Latin

Popular movies, movie stars, and TV series such as Harry Potter, Angelina Jolie, and Star Trek are mainly entertainment, but they also have helped keep Latin in the public eye when it otherwise would be forgotten outside academia.

Roman-era synagogue found near Sea of Galilee

The remains of a late Roman-Byzantine-era synagogue have been discovered in the Arbel National Park near the Sea of Galilee. The building is thought to date from the 2nd to 4th century C.E.

Do-it-yourself Cuirass Lorica Musculata

Those interested in the re-creation of Roman armor will want to visit Anthony Congiano's website for a tutorial on creating a leather Cuirass Lorica Musculata.

Roman burial ground discovered in the Blacklands

The remains of four adults dating to the 1st century have been discovered in Staverton near Trowbridge, England. The area is known to locals as the Blacklands and is said to be haunted. (photo of Roman coin)

2nd century Roman street found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists have discovered a Roman street dating to the 2nd-4th centuries in the Western Wall tunnels of the city of Jerusalem. The side street is believed to have connected two major roads near Temple Mount.

Romulus and Remus cave found?

Italian archaeologists believe they have found the cave where, according to legend, a she-wolf nursed Romulus and Remus, the twin founders of Rome.

Roman tombstone found in Scotland

A red sandstone Roman Tombstone, the first Scottish example ever found, has been unearthed near Inveresk, Scotland proving "that Inveresk was a pivotal Roman site in northern Britain."

Roman theatre lives in the Colosseum

The Colosseum in Rome will be the site of a special exhibition of Roman theatre, hosting "statues, mosaics, painted vases and fragments of wall paintings depicting actors and their masks, dancing girls, musicians, acrobats and jugglers" in a display that will continue until February 17, 2008.

Blacksmith's house yields Roman treasure

Archaeologists working on a site near Coriscada in northeastern Portugal have discovered a hoard of over 4,000 coins dating to the 4th century inside the wall of the home of a Roman blacksmith.

Roman Copenhagen

Danish archaeologists have discovered a rare 4th century Roman cemetery near Copenhagen, Denmark. "It is something special and rare in Denmark to have so many (ancient Roman) graves in one place," said archaeologist Rune Iversen.

Early Christian Art showcased in Venice

An new exhibit, Early Christian Art Between Rome and Byzantium, will showcase over 90 works from twenty Italian museums at the Intesa San Paolo's Palazzo Leoni Montanari. The show runs until November 18, 2007.

Dating tips from Zeus, King of the Gods

In an April, 1999 issue of The Onion, Zeus, King of the Gods, offers dating tips on handling the ladies such as "Today's Women Don't Like It When You Come To Them As A Bull Or Swan."

Own an authentic Roman bath!

Have an extra UK£300,000? If so, you can purchase an authentic Roman bath house in the town of Battle, East Sussex, England built in the first century C.E. for officers in the Roman navy.

Ancient Roman map available online

The Peutingerian Map, thought to be the oldest surviving road map in the world, is now available for study on the Internet through collaboration between the Austrian National Library and Christos Nüssli of Euratlas.com.