601 CE and Earlier

Early medieval jewelry found in Bridgewater

Strike up another point for British metal detectorists! A rare early medieval (400 to 500 C.E.) silver pinhead was found in 2006 by Timothy Phillips in a plowed field near Brigewater, England. The 2 cm decoration would originally been attached to a pin, much like a hatpin. (photo)

Remains of 3,000-Year-Old Fortress Discovered in Egypt

In Egypt, authorities have uncovered the remains of a giant fortress called Tjaru (or Tharu/Tharo) discovered in July 2007 near the Suez Canal.

Roman ritual plate found in Bulgaria

A beautifully-designed Roman marble plate, inscribed in Greek, has been found in the Bulgarian spa town of Hissar, known in Roman times as Diocletianopolis. The piece has been dated to the 3rd century C.E. (photo)

Study finds Stonehenge may have been royal burial ground

Researchers from the University of Sheffield, England, say that radiocarbon dating of remains from Stonehenge suggest that the site was a burial ground for Britain's first royal dynasty, as early as 500 years before the stones were erected.

Wigan, England once Roman Coccium?

Children from the Ince CE Primary School in Wigan, England are helping archaeologists from the Wigan Archaeological Society to investigate the remains of a Roman road in their town which once linked the village to Manchester.

The evolution of Roman garb

The textile and fashion website Fibre2fashion takes a look at the progression of Roman garb in a lengthy article. The piece analyzes the history of Roman clothing and textiles and discusses how it has influenced modern fashion. Includes references.

Japan's Gosashi tomb opened to scholars

A 5th century royal Japanese tomb has been made accessible to scholars for research and study for the first time. Koji Takahashi, a Toyama University archaeologist, was one of the experts allowed into the Gosashi tomb, which "is revered as the resting place of Empress Jingu, the semi-legendary wife of the country's 14th emperor."

From banker to warrior: the transformation of Sergio Iacomoni

What makes an Italian banker decide to gird his lions and become a Roman gladiator? "One day, we were talking. We had played enough tennis, worked out with enough sports. So we decided: OK, now we'll be gladiators," said Sergio Iacomoni, who now calls himself Nerone.

Did smallpox kill Gloucester Romans?

Experts working on the recently-discovered mass Roman grave in Gloucester, England will be using DNA tests to determine what killed over 90 individuals. A first look at the remains points to a 2nd century smallpox outbreak that swept across Britain.

Germanic society in England may not have been as brutal as once believed

Recent scientific studies have suggested that the Germanic invaders of England may have imposed an apartheid-like system on the native peoples, but an article by John Pattison of the University of South Australia in Adelaide disagrees. "The evidence is compatible with the idea of a much more integrated society," he says.

Nero's gate discovered in Cologne

Constructions workers at the site of Cologne, Germany's new metro line have discovered a Roman gate believed to have been built by the Emperor Nero and dating from the 1st century C.E.

New dig may explain Stonehenge

Just a few weeks after beginning, the excavators now working at Stonehenge have had what they describe as a "breakthrough." Clues towards the original placement of the bluestones, the site's oldest elements, may reveal why Stonehenge was built.

Roman statues receive makeover at Bath

A collection of statues that ring the Roman baths in Bath, England have received a facelift to remove years of grime. The renovation project is just part of a plan to "create an unforgettable experience for all our daytime and evening visitors."

3rd century amulet places Jews in Austria

A gold amulet dating to the 3rd century CE inscribed with a Jewish prayer has been discovered in the grave of a Roman child in Halbturn, Austria proving that people of the Jewish faith inhabited the country at the time.

Ancient Colchester South Gate discovered

Archaeologists believe that they have discovered part of the South gate of the Roman wall at Colchester, Britain's oldest Roman town. The wall was destroyed in 1818.

Anglo-Saxon cemetery yields treasure

The discovery of a series of 5th century Anglo Saxon graves in Kent, England has created the need for an inquest before the Kent County Council due to the wealth of artifacts found with the graves.

Venice exhibit focusses on contributions of "barbarians"

A new exhibit at Venice's Palazzo Grassi endeavors to disprove the reputation of the "barbaric tribes" during Europe's Dark Ages. Rome and the Barbarians: Birth of a New World will be at the Palazzo Grassi until July 20, 2008.

Discovered Roman settlement will not stop modern cemetery plans

The recent discovery of a Roman settlement near Lincoln, England, will not hold up plans for the creation of a modern cemetery. Archaeologists believe that the settlement dates from between the 2nd and 4th centuries.

"Vortigern Studies" website concentrates on early British history

Robert Vermaat has created a website called Vortigern Studies which is "dedicated to the study of the period between the Roman occupation of Britain and the Early Middle Ages."

Ancient Roman lighthouse discovered

Turkish archaeologists found a 2,000 year old lighthouse at the ancient Roman port of Patara. Built in the time of the Emperor Nero, it may be the oldest such structure that remains intact.

Druid Grave Unearthed in U.K.?

Archaeologists excavating a series of 1st century graves in Colchester, England think one of them may belong to a Druid.

Medieval documents help locate Roman fort

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort near Calstock in Cornwall credit references to silver smelting in medieval documents for helping to locate the site.

"Send me socks and underpants!"

According to archaeologist Robin Birley, the researcher's life can be pretty bleak until he finds the really big discovery, in this case, letters from Roman soldiers. Harry Mount of the Daily Mail has the story.

"As time goes by" Roman style

Just in time for Valentine's Day, Professor Judith Hallett of the University of Maryland, looks at how love was expressed in ancient Rome.

Rowing through Europe - Roman style

A YouTube video clip takes a look at the Navis Lusoria, a reconstruction of a late Roman period boat. (narration in German)

Museum offers virtual tour of Roman road

A new exhibit at the Museum of the Diocletian Baths in Rome lets visitors take a virtual walk down the Via Flaminia, a major travel artery which was "built in the third century B.C.E. to connect Rome to Ariminum, today's Rimini, on the Adriatic sea."

Roman bridge reconstructed in Northumberland

A 2nd century Roman bridge, which originally crossed the Tyne River in Northumberland, has been reconstructed on the river's bank. The original was one of the largest bridges in Roman Britain.

Holy Grail discovery claimed in the Louvre

Glasgow historian Mark Oxbrow believes he has found the real Holy Grail in - of all places - the Louvre in Paris. Oxbrow believes it is a "green gem-encrusted serving dish which he thinks could have been used at the Last Supper."

"Most significant piece of wooden furniture" found in Rome

A wooden and ivory throne, dating to the times of Julius Caesar, has been discovered in Herculaneum and is considered to be "the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there."

Emperor Valens cursed

Sometime in the 4th century, someone was REALLY cheesed off at the emperor — at least enough to curse him by defacing his image and wrapping lead around his face.