601 CE and Earlier

New dig may explain Stonehenge

Just a few weeks after beginning, the excavators now working at Stonehenge have had what they describe as a "breakthrough." Clues towards the original placement of the bluestones, the site's oldest elements, may reveal why Stonehenge was built.

Roman statues receive makeover at Bath

A collection of statues that ring the Roman baths in Bath, England have received a facelift to remove years of grime. The renovation project is just part of a plan to "create an unforgettable experience for all our daytime and evening visitors."

3rd century amulet places Jews in Austria

A gold amulet dating to the 3rd century CE inscribed with a Jewish prayer has been discovered in the grave of a Roman child in Halbturn, Austria proving that people of the Jewish faith inhabited the country at the time.

Ancient Colchester South Gate discovered

Archaeologists believe that they have discovered part of the South gate of the Roman wall at Colchester, Britain's oldest Roman town. The wall was destroyed in 1818.

Anglo-Saxon cemetery yields treasure

The discovery of a series of 5th century Anglo Saxon graves in Kent, England has created the need for an inquest before the Kent County Council due to the wealth of artifacts found with the graves.

Venice exhibit focusses on contributions of "barbarians"

A new exhibit at Venice's Palazzo Grassi endeavors to disprove the reputation of the "barbaric tribes" during Europe's Dark Ages. Rome and the Barbarians: Birth of a New World will be at the Palazzo Grassi until July 20, 2008.

Discovered Roman settlement will not stop modern cemetery plans

The recent discovery of a Roman settlement near Lincoln, England, will not hold up plans for the creation of a modern cemetery. Archaeologists believe that the settlement dates from between the 2nd and 4th centuries.

"Vortigern Studies" website concentrates on early British history

Robert Vermaat has created a website called Vortigern Studies which is "dedicated to the study of the period between the Roman occupation of Britain and the Early Middle Ages."

Ancient Roman lighthouse discovered

Turkish archaeologists found a 2,000 year old lighthouse at the ancient Roman port of Patara. Built in the time of the Emperor Nero, it may be the oldest such structure that remains intact.

Druid Grave Unearthed in U.K.?

Archaeologists excavating a series of 1st century graves in Colchester, England think one of them may belong to a Druid.

Medieval documents help locate Roman fort

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort near Calstock in Cornwall credit references to silver smelting in medieval documents for helping to locate the site.

"Send me socks and underpants!"

According to archaeologist Robin Birley, the researcher's life can be pretty bleak until he finds the really big discovery, in this case, letters from Roman soldiers. Harry Mount of the Daily Mail has the story.

"As time goes by" Roman style

Just in time for Valentine's Day, Professor Judith Hallett of the University of Maryland, looks at how love was expressed in ancient Rome.

Rowing through Europe - Roman style

A YouTube video clip takes a look at the Navis Lusoria, a reconstruction of a late Roman period boat. (narration in German)

Museum offers virtual tour of Roman road

A new exhibit at the Museum of the Diocletian Baths in Rome lets visitors take a virtual walk down the Via Flaminia, a major travel artery which was "built in the third century B.C.E. to connect Rome to Ariminum, today's Rimini, on the Adriatic sea."

Roman bridge reconstructed in Northumberland

A 2nd century Roman bridge, which originally crossed the Tyne River in Northumberland, has been reconstructed on the river's bank. The original was one of the largest bridges in Roman Britain.

Holy Grail discovery claimed in the Louvre

Glasgow historian Mark Oxbrow believes he has found the real Holy Grail in - of all places - the Louvre in Paris. Oxbrow believes it is a "green gem-encrusted serving dish which he thinks could have been used at the Last Supper."

"Most significant piece of wooden furniture" found in Rome

A wooden and ivory throne, dating to the times of Julius Caesar, has been discovered in Herculaneum and is considered to be "the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there."

Emperor Valens cursed

Sometime in the 4th century, someone was REALLY cheesed off at the emperor — at least enough to curse him by defacing his image and wrapping lead around his face.

Bronze Age bunsen burners

Archaeologist Jacqui Wood may have discovered a form of Bronze Age lantern tops while doing research in Italy. The ceramic, pots full of strange holes and long thought to be cheese strainers, may have been, in fact, lantern covers or a sort of "medieval bunsen burner." (photos)

Important English historic site may be sold for preservation reasons

When members of the Northamptonshire County Council bought Chester Farm near Irchester several years ago, they never dreamed they might need to put the historic site up for sale to keep it from falling into disrepair, but now that may be necessary.

Roman glue still holds

Archaeologists are working to re-create a Roman "superglue" used to stick silver laurel leaves to legionnaires' battle helmets. Traces of the glue were discovered on iron helmets found near the German town of Xanten which were buried in river mud for more than 1500 years.

London Olympic construction uncovers Roman artifacts

The London Olympics may leave a lasting mark on the city's history. Recently, workers at the site of the new London stadium unearthed artifacts including a Roman coin dating to the 4th century.

Byzantine-era synagogue sheds light on Jewish life

Jewish scholars are having to rethink opinions about life and culture in early Byzantine times after the discovery of a 5th century synagogue, complete with elaborate mosaic floors.

Stonehenge tunnel plan scrapped

The fear that increased traffic might damage the historic site has led English Heritage to cancel a plan to build a tunnel under Stonehenge.

"Domus del Chirurgo" sheds light on Roman medicine

For the past 17 years, archaeologists have worked at the site of the Domus del Chirurgo, the House of the Surgeon, the home of a 2nd century Roman doctor in Rimini, Italy. Among the discoveries: "the largest find of surgical instruments anywhere."

Roman barge to be salvaged in Cologne

Portions of a Roman barge, dating to as early as the 2nd century C.E., will soon be removed from its muddy resting place according to archaeologists. It may well be the "oldest Roman transport vessel left in central Europe."

Roman feast gear found in London well

A 4th century banqueting set which once belonged to a rich Roman family was discovered recently in a well during excavation in London. The set included 19 metal vessels. (photos)

New research project to illuminate "Dark Age" Scotland

The National Museums of Scotland are launching a new project to shed light on the so-called Dark Ages to educate people about the surprisingly sophisticated cultures of the Picts, Gaels, and Norse.

Pop culture breathes life into Latin

Popular movies, movie stars, and TV series such as Harry Potter, Angelina Jolie, and Star Trek are mainly entertainment, but they also have helped keep Latin in the public eye when it otherwise would be forgotten outside academia.