601 CE and Earlier

Byzantine bathhouse found in Israel

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority report that a 5th century Byzantine bathhouse has been discovered in Zikhron Ya‘aqov, Israel. The "magnificent" structure is well-preserved and believed to have belonged to a private residence. (photo)

Spanish grail "has tremendous cultural value"

While it may not be the true Holy Grail, an international congress held November 7-9, 2008 at the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain declared that the artifact "has tremendous cultural value due to its impact on history and literature."

Photos reveal undiscovered features of Hadrian's Wall

Researchers have been poring over more than 30,000 photos taken over the past 60 years for hints to the real nature of Hadrian's Wall. So far, the study has revealed "2,700 previously unrecorded historic features."

Scotland's annual Treasure Trove includes Roman tombstone

Scotland's Crown Office each year gets the honor of collecting rare artifacts discovered by archaeologists, metal detectorists and treasure hunters into a Treasure Trove. This year's finds include a Bronze Age sword and the first Roman tombstone discovered in nearly 200 years.

2nd century bronze chariot found in Bulgaria

A bronze-plated, elaborately-decorated chariot dating to the 2nd century was found recently at an ancient Thracian tomb in southeastern Bulgaria. Experts believe the vehicle was buried as part of the belongings of a wealthy Thracian aristocrat.

Hadrian's Wall section to get a facelift

A major reconstruction project for a section of Hadrian's Wall has begun at Great Chesters, near Haltwhistle, Northumberland. The project will spend UK£200,000 to repair an 800m section of the wall.

"Remarkable" Roman settlement found in Cumbria

Workers laying a sewer pipeline near Penrith, England have discovered the remains of a "remarkable" Roman settlement complete with cobbled streets and timber houses. The village may have been part of the local fort and used for housing soldiers' families.

Sewer construction unearths Roman and medieval settlements in Cumbria

Sewer construction near Penrith in northern England has uncovered a Roman settlement a mere meter beneath the soil. The project has also unearthed several medieval buildings, including a rare Grubenhauser. (photos)

Byzantine floor may have graced church in Jerusalem

The discovery of a simple mosaic floor beneath Temple Mount's Aksa Mosque has led archaeologists to speculate that the Mosque may have superceded a Byzantine church, but other experts disagree.

Great Bath gets a bath

The Great Bath at the city of Bath, England's famous Roman Baths, is being given a cleaning to remove a buildup of sludge and algae. (photo)

Ancient Celtic coins found in Dutch cornfield

A cache of 1st century gold and silver coins was found recently by a metal detectorist near the city of Maastricht, Netherlands. The mix of Germanic and Celtic coins. The Celtic treasure is believed to have been minted by a tribe called the Eburones.

5th century church discovered in Syria

Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be the largest ancient church ever discovered in Syria. The remains of the 5th century structure were found recently near Palmyra in central Syria.

Treasures of "first Byzantine port" wow experts

An amazing assortment of artifacts have been found beneath the waters on the Marmaris Sea near Istanbul with the discovery of what is thought to be the "first Byzantine port of the ancient city of Constantinople." The treasures are giving archaeologists a glimpse of life in 4th century Byzantium.

Archaeologists puzzle over layers of history in Hungary

A 3,500-year-old gravesite, a Roman military camp, and a medieval road are just three of the possibilities archaeologists are exploring at a dig near Rábapatona, Hungary.

Druid grave discovered near Colchester, England

The grave of a 1st century Druid, possibly the first such discovery in England, has been found in Stanway, near Colchester in eastern England. The body in the grave was one of a number of important people buried near the time of the Roman invasion.

5th-6th century palace discovered in Turkey

Archaeologists working in the Sanliurfa province of southeastern Turkey have discovered the remains of a 5th or 6th century C.E. early Byzantine palace featuring a mosaic of goddess the Kticic.

Virtual tour of Roman Cologne

A new website will soon allow visitors to take a 3D tour of the city of Cologne as it would have been 2,000 years ago. The city, a major trade center, became the Roman Empire's major northern outpost.

Vindolanda site receives funds for museum upgrade

The Roman fort of Vindolanda in northern England will receive UK£4M from the Heritage Lottery. The money will be used to upgrade the museum allowing them space to display many of the Roman site's spectacular discoveries.

"Gateway to the Roman invasion" found

New excavations in Kent, England have uncovered the hard surface of the country's coastline during the first Roman invasion (43 C.E.). The coast would have been two miles from the current coast. Also found: a Roman wall and a medieval dock.

Garum helps date Pompeii volcanic eruption

Garum, a pungent, fish-based seasoning, used in Roman cooking is being used to help precisely date the volcanic eruption that buried the city of Pompeii.

Leeks brought to Wales to flavor Roman stew

Andrew Dixey, Estate Manager for National Museum Wales, has created a Roman garden designed to help visitors understand the life of Romans in Wales. Among the plants brought to the country by the Romans was the garden leek, the unofficial symbol of Wales.

Study of Latin regains popularity

Latin, the language once considered dead and buried, is finding new life in New York's suburbs where middle school students hope to increase test scores, or read Harry Potter's Latin spells by studying the language.

Roman villa found in Budapest

Several months of excavation have unearthed the remains of a second century Roman villa in Budapest, Hungary, thought to be one of the earliest in the country.

Stonehenge dating controversy continues

New research on Stonehenge finds that it is actually older than previously believed. A recent excavation headed by Mike Parker-Pearson, professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, finds the monument to date to 3000 BCE and to have connections to cremation of the dead.

Beer brewed with ancient yeast

Raul Cano, a scientist at the California Polytechnic State University, has brewed beer using the 45 million year old yeast from a Lebanese weevil trapped in amber.

Dead Sea Scrolls come to the ROM in 2009

The Royal Ontario Museum has announced that it will bring sixteen of the Dead Sea Scrolls to Toronto for an exhibit which will run June 27, 2009, until Jan. 3, 2010.

Roman surgical instruments - Ouch!

The Claude Moore Health Service Library of the University of Virginia has a website with photos of reproductions of surgical instruments excavated from the House of the Surgeon at Pompeii. The reproductions were acquired by the University in 1947.

Archaeologist re-creates ancient booze

Patrick McGovern, a molecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, does not hesitate to chat about the history of alcoholic beverages, and has even re-created a "9,000-year-old Chinese drink we call Jiahu."

York skeleton shows signs of tuberculosis

The remains of a 4th century Roman discovered recently at York University may be "one of the earliest British victims of tuberculosis." Experts believe that cases of TB were rare in the north of England, and the discovery may help researchers learn more about the disease's spread across the country.

Roman bones found near Fosse Way

Several ancient graves were found recently near Leicestershire, England containing the remains of several humans believed to have been Roman. The graves were found near the Roman Fosse Way.