601 CE and Earlier

In the footsteps of Boudicca

Travel writer Charlie Connelly of the Daily Mail takes an interesting side trip with an article about his journey to retrace the steps of Iceni chieftain Boudicca who led a rebellion against the Romans in 60 C.E.

Chemical warfare in Roman times

It was a very bad day for 3rd century Roman soldiers who tried to defend a fortress by way of a cramped tunnel. Dead soldiers were doused with toxic substances and set on fire, causing the Romans to retreat.

Ravehenge? Not!

Stonehenge experts are less than thrilled by recent depictions of the monument as a venue for prehistoric raves. “It has undoubtedly been put to the press in an eye-catching way with the use of the word rave and all that sort of thing,” laughs Dave Batchelor, archaeologist at Stonehenge, reflecting on the report by Huddersfield University’s Dr Rupert Till.

Roman temples discovered in England

British Channel Four's Time Team has discovered the remains of four Roman temples near Redbourn, England. The temples may have been built to worship water gods, according to experts, since there are springs and a river in the area.

Life in Roman Britain through the eyes of garrison wives

One of the most important aspects of the excavations at England's Vindolana archaeological site is the insight given to everyday life at the fort, especially through the preserved letters of those stationed there. Australia's Couriermail.com has a feature.

Celts in Eastern Europe

The discovery of an early Celtic village near Krakow, Poland (3rd century BCE) sheds light on the history of the Celtic peoples in Europe. The village is unique in Poland.

Calculating Roman-style

Puzzled by Roman numerals? Always in a dither about how to write the latest SCA year? Maybe Scienceblog's Good Math, Bad Math website can help. The site explains the Roman numeral system and how to do calculations with them.

Historical remnants drive design of Leicester shopping center

Remains of a 15th century church and a Roman townhouse have changed architectural plans for a UK£30 million, nine-storey, 2,000-space car park at the Highcross shopping centre in Leicester, England. The contemporary parking garage has been redesigned to protect the ancient treasures.

Roman lamp depicts gynecological exam

Spanish archaeologists have discovered a rare 1st century ceramic lamp depicting a gynecological exam. The lamp was found near the city of Leon in northern Spain.

Re-created Israeli village teaches history to children

In the village of Kfar halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, children learn about Israel of 2,000 years ago and the Hanukkah story with the help of historic re-enactors. The village also features activities for kids such as harvesting olives and making oil.

Site of "dramatic Roman battle" discovered in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered a 3rd century Roman battlefield near Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany which may rewrite the history of the Roman army in the country.

Roman oil lamp factory discovered in Italy

A pottery workshop for the mass production of oil lamps dating to the 2nd century C.E. has been discovered near Modena, Italy. The complex created pottery lamps which bear the brand name stamped on the bottom. (photo)

Byzantine bathhouse found in Israel

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority report that a 5th century Byzantine bathhouse has been discovered in Zikhron Ya‘aqov, Israel. The "magnificent" structure is well-preserved and believed to have belonged to a private residence. (photo)

Spanish grail "has tremendous cultural value"

While it may not be the true Holy Grail, an international congress held November 7-9, 2008 at the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain declared that the artifact "has tremendous cultural value due to its impact on history and literature."

Photos reveal undiscovered features of Hadrian's Wall

Researchers have been poring over more than 30,000 photos taken over the past 60 years for hints to the real nature of Hadrian's Wall. So far, the study has revealed "2,700 previously unrecorded historic features."

Scotland's annual Treasure Trove includes Roman tombstone

Scotland's Crown Office each year gets the honor of collecting rare artifacts discovered by archaeologists, metal detectorists and treasure hunters into a Treasure Trove. This year's finds include a Bronze Age sword and the first Roman tombstone discovered in nearly 200 years.

2nd century bronze chariot found in Bulgaria

A bronze-plated, elaborately-decorated chariot dating to the 2nd century was found recently at an ancient Thracian tomb in southeastern Bulgaria. Experts believe the vehicle was buried as part of the belongings of a wealthy Thracian aristocrat.

Hadrian's Wall section to get a facelift

A major reconstruction project for a section of Hadrian's Wall has begun at Great Chesters, near Haltwhistle, Northumberland. The project will spend UK£200,000 to repair an 800m section of the wall.

"Remarkable" Roman settlement found in Cumbria

Workers laying a sewer pipeline near Penrith, England have discovered the remains of a "remarkable" Roman settlement complete with cobbled streets and timber houses. The village may have been part of the local fort and used for housing soldiers' families.

Sewer construction unearths Roman and medieval settlements in Cumbria

Sewer construction near Penrith in northern England has uncovered a Roman settlement a mere meter beneath the soil. The project has also unearthed several medieval buildings, including a rare Grubenhauser. (photos)

Byzantine floor may have graced church in Jerusalem

The discovery of a simple mosaic floor beneath Temple Mount's Aksa Mosque has led archaeologists to speculate that the Mosque may have superceded a Byzantine church, but other experts disagree.

Great Bath gets a bath

The Great Bath at the city of Bath, England's famous Roman Baths, is being given a cleaning to remove a buildup of sludge and algae. (photo)

Ancient Celtic coins found in Dutch cornfield

A cache of 1st century gold and silver coins was found recently by a metal detectorist near the city of Maastricht, Netherlands. The mix of Germanic and Celtic coins. The Celtic treasure is believed to have been minted by a tribe called the Eburones.

5th century church discovered in Syria

Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be the largest ancient church ever discovered in Syria. The remains of the 5th century structure were found recently near Palmyra in central Syria.

Treasures of "first Byzantine port" wow experts

An amazing assortment of artifacts have been found beneath the waters on the Marmaris Sea near Istanbul with the discovery of what is thought to be the "first Byzantine port of the ancient city of Constantinople." The treasures are giving archaeologists a glimpse of life in 4th century Byzantium.

Archaeologists puzzle over layers of history in Hungary

A 3,500-year-old gravesite, a Roman military camp, and a medieval road are just three of the possibilities archaeologists are exploring at a dig near Rábapatona, Hungary.

Druid grave discovered near Colchester, England

The grave of a 1st century Druid, possibly the first such discovery in England, has been found in Stanway, near Colchester in eastern England. The body in the grave was one of a number of important people buried near the time of the Roman invasion.

5th-6th century palace discovered in Turkey

Archaeologists working in the Sanliurfa province of southeastern Turkey have discovered the remains of a 5th or 6th century C.E. early Byzantine palace featuring a mosaic of goddess the Kticic.

Virtual tour of Roman Cologne

A new website will soon allow visitors to take a 3D tour of the city of Cologne as it would have been 2,000 years ago. The city, a major trade center, became the Roman Empire's major northern outpost.

Vindolanda site receives funds for museum upgrade

The Roman fort of Vindolanda in northern England will receive UK£4M from the Heritage Lottery. The money will be used to upgrade the museum allowing them space to display many of the Roman site's spectacular discoveries.