601 CE and Earlier

Roman pollution reaches Iceland

A new study, which appeared in the April 2009 issue of the journal Science of the Total Environment shows that air pollution from 1st and 2nd century Roman mining and metalworking operations has shown up in an Icelandic salt marsh.

Byzantine bathhouse excavation continues during rocket attacks

Archaeologists are working amidst rocket-fire to complete the excavation of a Byzantine village, complete with a large bathhouse, near Gaza in Israel. Because of the existence and size of the luxury bathhouse, experts believe that the area was inhabited by wealthy residents.

Burgundy vineyards dated to Roman times

A recent archaeological dig sponsored by the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives and the ARTeHIS Laboratory (CNRS/Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication/Université de Bourgogne) shows that the production of burgundy wine near Dijon, France dates to Roman times.

Bulgarian and British team will study early European settlement

Archaeologists from Bulgaria and Great Britain are joining efforts to begin research in the area of the lower Danube River, concentrating on the 5th through 7th centuries. The goal of the project is to study "changes in lifestyle and social life in the transitional period from antiquity to the Middle Ages."

Photograph reveals "Essence of Stonehenge"

A recent photo contest by Amateur Photographer magazine called for camera buffs to capture the "Essence of Stonehenge." (photo)

Gloucester archaeologists search for "missing link" in wall

Archaeologists are hoping that they will complete their discovery of the Roman wall which once ringed Gloucester, England during a summer dig. Evidence of much of the original wall has been found, except for one portion "between the corner of Parliament Street and Southgate Street."

"I" and "we" among oldest English words

Linguistics experts at Reading University have used computer model analysis to date English words and to predict which words may soon become extinct.

Colchester Roman circus for sale

Townhouses may soon cover the track of the only known Roman circus in Britain. The developer, Taylor Wimpey, has decided to sell the land which includes the historic starting gate and Sergeants' Mess in Colchester, England.

Folding chairs in history

DesignBoom.com has created a website dedicated to the history of the folding chair from ancient times through the Renaissance. The website includes illustrations.

Mystery of "lost" Japanese kingdom continues

Archaeologists in Japan have long known about the existence of the ancient Yamatai kingdom, but they have never been able to find it. Now they are seeking the help of history buffs to solve the mystery.

Archaeologists ponder Pagan mosaic found under cathedral

Three mosaics of tiny tiles, featuring naked people possibly performing pagan rituals, have been unearthed underneath the Cathedral of Reggio Emilia in Italy.

Coins from the Eburones tribe found in the Netherlands

A metal detector hobbyist has discovered a hoard of over 100 Celtic coins dating to the 1st century B.C.E. in a corn field near Maastricht, Netherlands. The coins are believed to have been created by the Eburones, a Germanic tribe.

Chocolate dated to 1000 CE in North America

Chocolate was drunk in North America as early as 1000 C.E., according to an article posted at LiveScience magazine online. The article describes cacoa residue found inside carved cylinder tubes in northern New Mexico.

Roman mosaic found in Cotswold field

Paul Ballinger and John Carter didn't find anything with their metal detector recently, but noticed tiles in a plowed field. After some searching, they uncovered a 40-foot (12 meter) diameter mosaic floor dating to 4th century Roman times. (photo)

Chocolate residue found in ancient pottery remains

Residue from a chemical only known in chocolate has been found on pottery shards dating back to between 1400 to 900 BC in Central America, according to an article at LiveScience magazine online.

In the footsteps of Boudicca

Travel writer Charlie Connelly of the Daily Mail takes an interesting side trip with an article about his journey to retrace the steps of Iceni chieftain Boudicca who led a rebellion against the Romans in 60 C.E.

Chemical warfare in Roman times

It was a very bad day for 3rd century Roman soldiers who tried to defend a fortress by way of a cramped tunnel. Dead soldiers were doused with toxic substances and set on fire, causing the Romans to retreat.

Ravehenge? Not!

Stonehenge experts are less than thrilled by recent depictions of the monument as a venue for prehistoric raves. “It has undoubtedly been put to the press in an eye-catching way with the use of the word rave and all that sort of thing,” laughs Dave Batchelor, archaeologist at Stonehenge, reflecting on the report by Huddersfield University’s Dr Rupert Till.

Roman temples discovered in England

British Channel Four's Time Team has discovered the remains of four Roman temples near Redbourn, England. The temples may have been built to worship water gods, according to experts, since there are springs and a river in the area.

Life in Roman Britain through the eyes of garrison wives

One of the most important aspects of the excavations at England's Vindolana archaeological site is the insight given to everyday life at the fort, especially through the preserved letters of those stationed there. Australia's Couriermail.com has a feature.

Celts in Eastern Europe

The discovery of an early Celtic village near Krakow, Poland (3rd century BCE) sheds light on the history of the Celtic peoples in Europe. The village is unique in Poland.

Calculating Roman-style

Puzzled by Roman numerals? Always in a dither about how to write the latest SCA year? Maybe Scienceblog's Good Math, Bad Math website can help. The site explains the Roman numeral system and how to do calculations with them.

Historical remnants drive design of Leicester shopping center

Remains of a 15th century church and a Roman townhouse have changed architectural plans for a UK£30 million, nine-storey, 2,000-space car park at the Highcross shopping centre in Leicester, England. The contemporary parking garage has been redesigned to protect the ancient treasures.

Roman lamp depicts gynecological exam

Spanish archaeologists have discovered a rare 1st century ceramic lamp depicting a gynecological exam. The lamp was found near the city of Leon in northern Spain.

Re-created Israeli village teaches history to children

In the village of Kfar halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, children learn about Israel of 2,000 years ago and the Hanukkah story with the help of historic re-enactors. The village also features activities for kids such as harvesting olives and making oil.

Site of "dramatic Roman battle" discovered in Germany

Archaeologists have discovered a 3rd century Roman battlefield near Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany which may rewrite the history of the Roman army in the country.

Roman oil lamp factory discovered in Italy

A pottery workshop for the mass production of oil lamps dating to the 2nd century C.E. has been discovered near Modena, Italy. The complex created pottery lamps which bear the brand name stamped on the bottom. (photo)

Byzantine bathhouse found in Israel

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority report that a 5th century Byzantine bathhouse has been discovered in Zikhron Ya‘aqov, Israel. The "magnificent" structure is well-preserved and believed to have belonged to a private residence. (photo)

Spanish grail "has tremendous cultural value"

While it may not be the true Holy Grail, an international congress held November 7-9, 2008 at the Catholic University of Valencia, Spain declared that the artifact "has tremendous cultural value due to its impact on history and literature."

Photos reveal undiscovered features of Hadrian's Wall

Researchers have been poring over more than 30,000 photos taken over the past 60 years for hints to the real nature of Hadrian's Wall. So far, the study has revealed "2,700 previously unrecorded historic features."