601 CE and Earlier

Vindolanda Writing Tablets to return home

Thanks to a UK£1.8m grant from regional development agency One North East, the Vindolanda Writing Tablets, the rich chronicle of Roman military in Britain, will be coming home to Vindolanda for "a rolling programme of displays" in 2012.

To see Roman France, go south

When asked the best way to view the Roman heritage of France, Patrick Périn, the director of the Musée des Antiquités Nationales replied, "Go South." That is what travel reporter Elaine Sciolino did to research her article for the New York Times. (photos)

New book looks at perception of the Druids in Great Britain

The popular perception of the Druid as either a sage with a long beard or a blood-thirsty expert in human sacrifice is the topic of a new book by Bristol University professor Ronald Hutton: Blood and Mistletoe: a History of the Druids in Britain.

1st century Roman palace found in Romania

Romanian archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a Roman palace, dating to the time of Emperor Trajan, in the southwestern village of Zavoi. Experts believe that the structure was built during the first Dacian-Roman War of 101-102.

Roman vicus sheds light on the last days of Roman Britain

Archaeologists working on a Roman settlement near Bowes, England have discovered a vicus, an unplanned settlement on the outskirts of the fort dating to the 2nd to 3rd centuries, which would have been home to hundreds of people.

Roman road being destroyed by 4x4s

The last remnants of a Roman road from Wandlebury to Horseheath, England are being destroyed by trail bikers and 4x4 drivers who using it as a race track.

Largest Roman coin to be auctioned

The largest known silver Roman coin, dating to the 4th century C.E., will be auctioned in late May 2009 in the United States. The coin weighs 104.30 grams.(photo)

SCAdian expert on Deadliest Warrior

YouTube has video clips available of the Spartan vs Ninja episode of Spike TV's Deadliest Warrior program. The Spartan expert on the program is the SCA's own Sir Balin of Tor (Barry Jacobsen).

Praise God and Pass the Tartar Sauce?

The early Christians of Rome ate a diet including much more fish than their pagan neighbors, according to a new analysis of catacomb burials.

Hebrides Scots linked to Irish invaders

A new DNA study may prove a 10th century historical source which states that the western islands of Scotland were invaded by the Irish in the early 6th century. The new evidence shows "a significant Irish genetics component in Scots' ancestry." The study may also prove that the invasions occurred earlier than the 6th century.

Late Roman village discovered in Austria

The remains of a village, dating to late Roman times, have been discovered at the site of a proposed retirement home in Salzburg, Austria. Archaeologists believe it is the "largest find from that period of history in Salzburg to date."

Roman pollution reaches Iceland

A new study, which appeared in the April 2009 issue of the journal Science of the Total Environment shows that air pollution from 1st and 2nd century Roman mining and metalworking operations has shown up in an Icelandic salt marsh.

Byzantine bathhouse excavation continues during rocket attacks

Archaeologists are working amidst rocket-fire to complete the excavation of a Byzantine village, complete with a large bathhouse, near Gaza in Israel. Because of the existence and size of the luxury bathhouse, experts believe that the area was inhabited by wealthy residents.

Burgundy vineyards dated to Roman times

A recent archaeological dig sponsored by the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives and the ARTeHIS Laboratory (CNRS/Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication/Université de Bourgogne) shows that the production of burgundy wine near Dijon, France dates to Roman times.

Bulgarian and British team will study early European settlement

Archaeologists from Bulgaria and Great Britain are joining efforts to begin research in the area of the lower Danube River, concentrating on the 5th through 7th centuries. The goal of the project is to study "changes in lifestyle and social life in the transitional period from antiquity to the Middle Ages."

Photograph reveals "Essence of Stonehenge"

A recent photo contest by Amateur Photographer magazine called for camera buffs to capture the "Essence of Stonehenge." (photo)

Gloucester archaeologists search for "missing link" in wall

Archaeologists are hoping that they will complete their discovery of the Roman wall which once ringed Gloucester, England during a summer dig. Evidence of much of the original wall has been found, except for one portion "between the corner of Parliament Street and Southgate Street."

"I" and "we" among oldest English words

Linguistics experts at Reading University have used computer model analysis to date English words and to predict which words may soon become extinct.

Colchester Roman circus for sale

Townhouses may soon cover the track of the only known Roman circus in Britain. The developer, Taylor Wimpey, has decided to sell the land which includes the historic starting gate and Sergeants' Mess in Colchester, England.

Folding chairs in history

DesignBoom.com has created a website dedicated to the history of the folding chair from ancient times through the Renaissance. The website includes illustrations.

Mystery of "lost" Japanese kingdom continues

Archaeologists in Japan have long known about the existence of the ancient Yamatai kingdom, but they have never been able to find it. Now they are seeking the help of history buffs to solve the mystery.

Archaeologists ponder Pagan mosaic found under cathedral

Three mosaics of tiny tiles, featuring naked people possibly performing pagan rituals, have been unearthed underneath the Cathedral of Reggio Emilia in Italy.

Coins from the Eburones tribe found in the Netherlands

A metal detector hobbyist has discovered a hoard of over 100 Celtic coins dating to the 1st century B.C.E. in a corn field near Maastricht, Netherlands. The coins are believed to have been created by the Eburones, a Germanic tribe.

Chocolate dated to 1000 CE in North America

Chocolate was drunk in North America as early as 1000 C.E., according to an article posted at LiveScience magazine online. The article describes cacoa residue found inside carved cylinder tubes in northern New Mexico.

Roman mosaic found in Cotswold field

Paul Ballinger and John Carter didn't find anything with their metal detector recently, but noticed tiles in a plowed field. After some searching, they uncovered a 40-foot (12 meter) diameter mosaic floor dating to 4th century Roman times. (photo)

Chocolate residue found in ancient pottery remains

Residue from a chemical only known in chocolate has been found on pottery shards dating back to between 1400 to 900 BC in Central America, according to an article at LiveScience magazine online.

In the footsteps of Boudicca

Travel writer Charlie Connelly of the Daily Mail takes an interesting side trip with an article about his journey to retrace the steps of Iceni chieftain Boudicca who led a rebellion against the Romans in 60 C.E.

Chemical warfare in Roman times

It was a very bad day for 3rd century Roman soldiers who tried to defend a fortress by way of a cramped tunnel. Dead soldiers were doused with toxic substances and set on fire, causing the Romans to retreat.

Ravehenge? Not!

Stonehenge experts are less than thrilled by recent depictions of the monument as a venue for prehistoric raves. “It has undoubtedly been put to the press in an eye-catching way with the use of the word rave and all that sort of thing,” laughs Dave Batchelor, archaeologist at Stonehenge, reflecting on the report by Huddersfield University’s Dr Rupert Till.

Roman temples discovered in England

British Channel Four's Time Team has discovered the remains of four Roman temples near Redbourn, England. The temples may have been built to worship water gods, according to experts, since there are springs and a river in the area.