601 CE and Earlier

Bog People subject of new book

In a review for The Telegraph, Philip Hoare looks at Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination, a book by University of California, Berkeley professor Karin Sanders.

Roman bones show life of "disease and hard labour"

The discovery of a Roman grave in Weston-super-Mare, England last year has given experts insight into the life of 2nd-4th century Roman inhabitants of Britain. This particular man, aged between 36 and 45,  lived a life "defined by disease and hard labour."

The dark origins of Valentine's Day

Nearly everyone celebrates Valentine's Day, but many are not familiar with the origins, some rather dark, of the holiday for lovers. Ngonidzashe Dzimiri of the Sunday Standard offers a history.

Joan of Arc "relics" trace to ancient Egypt

Devotees of Joan of Arc were disppointed recently to learn that relices of Joan of Arc, overseen by the Archbishop of Tours in Chinon, France, are not only fake, but actually the "bones of a human and a cat tracing back to ancient Egypt."

Equos Designs

Equos Designs' proprietor makes Iron Age Celtic jewelry designs in fine silver. They have horses and stags and wolves, suns and moons.

Computer technology to be used to read inscription on Roman altar

Two experts from the University of Mainz in Germany are using the latest computer technology to try to decypher the "invisible" inscription on a 3th century Roman altar. The stone was discovered in the River Tyne in 1672, but has never been legible. (video)

Stonehenge site of midwinter feast

A recent study of pig and cattle bones found near Stonehenge has led researchers to believe that it was the site of huge winter solstice feasts. Experts believe animals were herded to the site and then slaughtered to feed celebrants.

Pomegranate part of healthy Roman diet in England

Romans may have brought more than forts and paved roads to England during their occupation. They may have brought a healthy diet. (photo)

4th century Roman grave found in Hungary

A team of archaeologists have discovered a grave dating to the last period of Roman occupation in the northwest Hungarian province of Pannonia. The age of the grave was determined by a bone comb found in it.

Alexander the Great's Linen Armor

Researchers have found that Alexander the Great probably wore armor made of laminated linen fabric, rather than metal, and that the multiple glued layers functioned similarly to modern flak jackets.

Lycanthropy and the Byzantines

Apparently the Byzantines had a werewolf problem, according to a new article by four scholars from the University of Athens. "Lycanthropy in Byzantine times ([CE] 330–1453)," looks at how doctors in the Empire dealt with patients who believed they were werewolves.

When in Rome... read!

Mysteries set in ancient Rome continue to catch the imaginations of readers.

Roman city found in Libya

Italian archaeologists have discovered a buried Roman city near the city of Tobruk in Libya. Remnants of the city were found beneath sand dunes, leading experts to believe that a large part of the city sank.

Roman tower found in Chester

Archaeologists working to repair a section of Chester, England's city wall have discovered the remains of a Roman tower. “To our surprise, almost as soon as we started digging, a well-made sandstone wall appeared. It was running across the line of the City Wall and was more than 1m thick," said City Archaeologist Mike Morris.

Saint Nicholas in Turkey

St. Nicholas, the 4th century Christian saint who influenced so many Christmas traditions, is thought to have lived and died in Myra, Turkey. His remains were removed to Bari in southern Italy in the 11th century. Now Turkish officials would like to see Nicholas' basilica restored.

The origins of December 25 as Christmas

An online article by Andrew McGowan, an associate professor of early Christian history at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for the Biblical Archaeology Review discusses how December 25 came to be chosen as the date of Christ's birth.

Latin students create wiki for the "Study of Ancient Gaul and Ancient Celtic Culture"

Students of the John Carroll School Latin 2 class found themselves dissatisfied with their textbook depiction of ancient Celts and Gauls. Their solution? Create a wiki of online links relating to the subject. (map)

Jesus studied with the Druids, according to new film

Gordon Strachan, a minister for the Church of Scotland, believes Jesus may have visited England and studied with the Druids at Glastonbury. His research is featured in a new film, And Did Those Feet.

Same-sex marriage in the Middle Ages

Historians believe they have evidence of same-sex marriage in late antiquity and early Middle Ages. One piece of evidence is a monastic icon depicting the marriage of two male saints with Jesus officiating. (photo)

Archaeologist offers "tastes of the past"

Archaeologist Jacqui Wood is not afraid go back to the basics with her cooking. The author of Tasting the Past: Recipes from the Stone Age to the Present, Wood cooks in the style of the Romans and the Celts.

Bath's "Great Drain" to be inspected

Nearly 2,000 years after construction, the overflow from the Roman bath in Bath, England is going to be inspected. Archaeologists are excited at the prospect of discovering what Roman - and subsequent generations - threw down the drain.

3rd century Roman townhouse found under Canterbury theater

Archaeologists have discovered the ruins of a 3rd century Roman townhouse beneath the Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury, England. "It's quite unexpected," said archaeologist James Holman.

Antonine Wall: Scotland's hidden Roman treasure

When blogger Keir Roper-Caldbeck planned to bicycle the length of -- and report on -- Scotland's newest World Heritage site, the Antonine Wall, he thought it would be an easy task. That proved not to be the case. His blog of the journey is online.

Metal detector finds UK£1m torcs

Metal detector enthusiast David Booth was "stunned" to learn that four Iron Age gold torcs, dating to late Roman times, could bring him over UK£1m. The torcs were discovered in September 2009 in Stirlingshire, Scotland. (photo & video)

US in better shape than Rome, says Cornell professor

"Almost everything that has happened [in the United States] over the last year has happened in some deviation before in the period that I study, which is essentially the equivalent of 2008 for the Roman Empire," said said Kim Bowes, Cornell assistant professor of classical archaeology at a recent lecture.

4th century Roman temple found in Tuscany

A rectangular stone and marble temple, built using the opus testaceum technique, has been discovered near Marina di Alberese in central Italy. The existence of the 4th century temple may suggest a larger settlement in the area.

A feast for the orgy

In an article for Remembrance of Meals Past, Corky White remembers the time she was asked to prepare a Roman feast for a Harvard professor.

Hadrian's Wall: cultural melting pot

Research shows that the Roman guards who occupied Hadrian's Wall came from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, from northern to eastern European. Recently, evidence has shown that a fair number came from the Middle East.

Happy birthday, Asterix!

On October 29, 2009, Gaul's most famous denizon, Asterix, celebrated his Lth birthday. (That would be 50 to the Roman-numerically-challenged.) The comic book character was created in 1959 by René Goscinny and illustrated by Albert Uderzo.

Beowulf-era ceremonial hall discovered in Denmark

Archaeologists in Denmark are puzzled over the discovery of a large building "littered with bits and pieces of exquisite golden jewellery, glass and bronze broaches, high quality artifacts, such as drinking glasses and ceramics, which all seem to have been deliberately smashed in some ritual."