601 CE and Earlier

Feature-length "Rome" in the works

Bruno Heller, creator of the hit TV series Rome, has announced plans for a feature-length film.

York's "Ivory Bangle Lady" of African origin

Recent analysis of a Roman burial in the city of York show that the remains belonged to a "high status" woman of African origin. Dubbed the "Ivory Bangle Lady," the woman was buried in the late 4th century along with "items including jet and elephant ivory bracelets, earrings, beads and a blue glass jug." (photos)

Stonehenge surrounded by Stonehedge

A new study of the landscape around Stonehenge seems to suggest that Stonehenge was once surrounded by two low, concentric hedges. The media have dubbed the foliage "Stonehedge."

Building an Iron Age Celtic roundhouse

A PDF with complete instructions for construction of an SCA tent version of an Iron Age Celtic roundhouse is available to download online.

Byzantine-era road uncovered in Jerusalem

The Madaba Map, a mosaic depicting 6th-7th century Jerusalem, shows Cardo Street in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City. Now, the Byzantine-era street has been discovered by archaeologists.

Views on risk: past and present

In a recent lecture entitled "Risk and Humanities," Cambridge classicist Mary Beard explored "the images of gambling and associated brawls that appear on the walls of bars in Pompeii."

Auning Woman: "a perfectly ordinary looking woman"

Experts at the Panum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have shown the world the face of the 2000-year-old Auning Woman, found in 1886 in a northeastern Jutland bog.

Roman temple and early medieval church found in Spain

Archaeologists working on excavations in the chancel of the Church of Sant Feliu Girona in Catalonia, Spain, have discovered the remains of a 6th or 7th century tombs, as well as an ancient Roman temple.

Gregorian Code fragments found in medieval book

Scraps of packing material in the cover of a medieval book have been identified as pieces of the 4th century Gregorian Code, a Roman law book, long believed to have been lost.

Source of Aqua Traiana discovered

British father and son filmmaking team Ted and Michael O'Neill believe they have found the source of the Aqua Traiana, the 2nd century aqueduct, constructed by the Emperor Trajan, 30-40km northwest of Rome. (photos)

Lecture series on the ancient world at University of Southern California and Getty Villa

VCAW-IMI (Visual Culture of the Ancient World & International Museum Institute at USC) will present a lecture series dealing with the ancient world in March and April 2010. The lectures will take place at USC and at the Getty Villa.

Search on for St. Columba's Scottish monastery

Archaeologists from Orkney College are looking for the original 6th century monastery built by the Irish monk St. Columba on the island of Iona, off Mull in the Scottish Hebrides.

Burial a "glimpse into Sleaford's Roman past"

Recent archaeological finds in the town of Sleaford, England prove that the town "was a very large and important settlement in the Roman period." Among the discoveries were the skeleton of a 4th century woman.

Bog People subject of new book

In a review for The Telegraph, Philip Hoare looks at Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination, a book by University of California, Berkeley professor Karin Sanders.

Roman bones show life of "disease and hard labour"

The discovery of a Roman grave in Weston-super-Mare, England last year has given experts insight into the life of 2nd-4th century Roman inhabitants of Britain. This particular man, aged between 36 and 45,  lived a life "defined by disease and hard labour."

The dark origins of Valentine's Day

Nearly everyone celebrates Valentine's Day, but many are not familiar with the origins, some rather dark, of the holiday for lovers. Ngonidzashe Dzimiri of the Sunday Standard offers a history.

Joan of Arc "relics" trace to ancient Egypt

Devotees of Joan of Arc were disppointed recently to learn that relices of Joan of Arc, overseen by the Archbishop of Tours in Chinon, France, are not only fake, but actually the "bones of a human and a cat tracing back to ancient Egypt."

Equos Designs

Equos Designs' proprietor makes Iron Age Celtic jewelry designs in fine silver. They have horses and stags and wolves, suns and moons.

Computer technology to be used to read inscription on Roman altar

Two experts from the University of Mainz in Germany are using the latest computer technology to try to decypher the "invisible" inscription on a 3th century Roman altar. The stone was discovered in the River Tyne in 1672, but has never been legible. (video)

Stonehenge site of midwinter feast

A recent study of pig and cattle bones found near Stonehenge has led researchers to believe that it was the site of huge winter solstice feasts. Experts believe animals were herded to the site and then slaughtered to feed celebrants.

Pomegranate part of healthy Roman diet in England

Romans may have brought more than forts and paved roads to England during their occupation. They may have brought a healthy diet. (photo)

4th century Roman grave found in Hungary

A team of archaeologists have discovered a grave dating to the last period of Roman occupation in the northwest Hungarian province of Pannonia. The age of the grave was determined by a bone comb found in it.

Alexander the Great's Linen Armor

Researchers have found that Alexander the Great probably wore armor made of laminated linen fabric, rather than metal, and that the multiple glued layers functioned similarly to modern flak jackets.

Lycanthropy and the Byzantines

Apparently the Byzantines had a werewolf problem, according to a new article by four scholars from the University of Athens. "Lycanthropy in Byzantine times ([CE] 330–1453)," looks at how doctors in the Empire dealt with patients who believed they were werewolves.

When in Rome... read!

Mysteries set in ancient Rome continue to catch the imaginations of readers.

Roman city found in Libya

Italian archaeologists have discovered a buried Roman city near the city of Tobruk in Libya. Remnants of the city were found beneath sand dunes, leading experts to believe that a large part of the city sank.

Roman tower found in Chester

Archaeologists working to repair a section of Chester, England's city wall have discovered the remains of a Roman tower. “To our surprise, almost as soon as we started digging, a well-made sandstone wall appeared. It was running across the line of the City Wall and was more than 1m thick," said City Archaeologist Mike Morris.

Saint Nicholas in Turkey

St. Nicholas, the 4th century Christian saint who influenced so many Christmas traditions, is thought to have lived and died in Myra, Turkey. His remains were removed to Bari in southern Italy in the 11th century. Now Turkish officials would like to see Nicholas' basilica restored.

The origins of December 25 as Christmas

An online article by Andrew McGowan, an associate professor of early Christian history at the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, for the Biblical Archaeology Review discusses how December 25 came to be chosen as the date of Christ's birth.

Latin students create wiki for the "Study of Ancient Gaul and Ancient Celtic Culture"

Students of the John Carroll School Latin 2 class found themselves dissatisfied with their textbook depiction of ancient Celts and Gauls. Their solution? Create a wiki of online links relating to the subject. (map)