601 CE and Earlier

Advanced technologies planned to digitize the Dead Sea Scrolls

Thanks to several major gifts, the Israel Antiquities Authority plans to digitize the entire Dead Sea Scrolls collection and "make the images freely available and accessible to anyone anywhere in the world on the internet."

"Caucasian Stonehenge" found in Russia

Russian archaeologist Andrey Belinskiy believes he has discovered a "Caucasian Stonehenge" built by a Bronze Age civilization around 1600 BCE. The well-preserved ruins are located in the North Caucasus mountains.

Berryfield Mosaic removal and conservation underway

"The main trouble is getting it through the door," said Nick Barnfield, project conservator with Cliveden Conservation, about the removal of the Berryfield mosaic at Colchester Castle, once the dining room floor of a 2nd century Roman townhouse.

Decoding Ptolemy's map re-dates German cities

A group of experts from Berlin Technical University's Department for Geodesy and Geoinformation Science have cracked a 2nd  century map of Germany created by Ptolemy, re-dating many of the country's cities by 1,000 years.

2nd century Roman waterwheel found in Cumbria

A team of volunteer archaeologists has discovered a rare Roman waterwheel dating to the first or second century C.E. near Cockermouth, an ancient market town in Cumbria, England. (photos)

24 August 410: "the 9/11 of the ancient world"

On August 24, 410, Imperial Rome was sacked by an invading force of Visigoths from northern Europe, an event that has been compared with September 11, 2001 in the United States.

"Rare and exquisite" Roman lantern found in England

21-year-old metal detectorist Danny Mills delighted local archaeologists when he discovered an extremely rare 1st - 3rd century Roman lantern near Sudbury, England. The bronze lantern is believed to be the only one of its kind in Britain. (photo)

Ancient chess pieces found in China

10 chess pieces dating to the 3rd century have been found in a tomb in Pingshan, China.

Gaius Appuleius Diocles best paid athlete ever

The astronomical sponsorship deals amassed by modern athletes are dwarfed by prize money earned by an illiterate Roman charioteer named Gaius Appuleius Diocles, according to University of Pennsylvania classical studies professor Peter Struck.

Ancient winery found at Byzantine fortress

A two-room winery, dating from the time of the Byzantine Emperors Anastasius I (491-518 CE), and Justinian I (527-565 CE), has been discovered at the Byzantine fortress near the town of Byala on the Black Sea.

Roman helmet expected to bring large sum in Christie's auction

Bidders, get your checkbooks ready... A late first century Roman helmet is scheduled to be auctioned October 7, 2010 by Christie's Auction House. Predicted cost: US$242,000 to $363,000. (photo)

Analysis of pills gives insight into Roman medicine

A geneticist has analyzed some Roman pills found in a shipwreck off Italy 20 years ago. The pills date to the 2nd century BCE and were found inside a wooden medical kit.

"Significant" Roman find in Caistor, England

Archaeologists excavating a derelict pub in Caistor, England say they have a "significant" find with the discovery of a 4th century Roman cemetery containing over forty bodies. Orientation and lack of grave goods leads experts to believe the burials were Christian.

Ancient bog road puzzles archaeologists

Archaeologists are trying to discover the exact purpose of an oak timber road found in the Bord na Móna bog in Tipperary, Ireland.

Early period trading vessels found off Italian coast

A small fleet of trading vessels, dating from the 5th-7th centuries, has been found off the coast of the Italian island of Zannone. Evidence of the ships' cargoes was also discovered.

Roman lantern found in England

An intact Roman lantern has been found in a farm field in Sudbury, Suffolk, England. The lantern is made of bronze and dates to between the 1st and 3rd centuy CE.

Roman industrial estate found in North Yorkshire

Archaeologists working on a dig in North Yorkshire, England have discovered a Roman industrial estate believed to have been used by the Ninth Hispanic legion.

A Python goes to gladiator school

Terry Jones, of Monty Python fame, takes on the persona of Roman gladiator to learn about training from the experts. (video)

Roman governor's villa fit for an emperor

When it was built in the 2nd century, Lullingstone villa was the height of luxury for its owner, Publius Helvius Pertinax, a former Roman Emperor and Governor of Britain. Now the site is one of the best examples of Roman villas in the country. (photos)

Archeological goldmine found during Sofia subway build

The construction of a new metro line in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, has unearthed some marvels including major sections of Serdica, the Roman city and vacation site for Constantine the Great.

Dogs of the Ancient World

Archaeology Magazine takes an in-depth look at the history of dogs, from Ancient Greece to Mesoamerica to Medieval Europe.

French Gallo-Roman sanctuary is archaeologists' dream

Archaeologists working near the ancient site of Vindunum  (now Le Mans, France) have found an "exceptional discovery," a vast complex of temples dating to the first through third centuries C.E.

Time Team hopes to find Boudica's hometown

Archaeologists, including a team from Channel 4's Time Team, are set to sift through layers of history in search of evidence linking the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, near Norwich, England, to the settlement of East Anglia's Iceni queen Boudica.

5th century Buddhist temple found in Afghanistan

Amidst the fighting south of Kabul, Afghanistan, comes a bright spot: the discovery of a Buddhist-era temple dating back to the 5th century.

Experts debate meaning of symbols on Pictish stones

The debate continues among archeologists and linguists over the symbols on over 200 carved stones dating to the time of the Picts in Scotland. Archeologists feel that the carvings are "symbolic markings that communicated information."

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

Romans wore socks with sandals

Fibers found on a rusty sandal nail suggest that Romans were wearing socks under their sandals. The sandal was discovered in a dig in North Yorkshire, England.

Major Roman road found in south-eastern Serbia

An eight meter wide, stone block road, dating to the first century, has been discovered near the town of Dimitrovgrad, Serbia. Archaeologists believe the road was part of the Via Militaris, a major Roman military road.

Greek murder victim in "wrong place at wrong time"

Sandra Garvie-Lok really likes her job, even though it requires she help investigate a 1500-year-old murder. The victim, John Doe, is believed to have been a witness to the Slavic invasion of the Greek city of Nemea during the Byzantine era.

Rare Ptolemaic gold coin found in Israel

A large 2,200 year old gold coin has been found in Israel. The coin was issued by Ptolemy Vin 191 BCE and was minted in Egypt.