601 CE and Earlier

Time Team hopes to find Boudica's hometown

Archaeologists, including a team from Channel 4's Time Team, are set to sift through layers of history in search of evidence linking the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, near Norwich, England, to the settlement of East Anglia's Iceni queen Boudica.

5th century Buddhist temple found in Afghanistan

Amidst the fighting south of Kabul, Afghanistan, comes a bright spot: the discovery of a Buddhist-era temple dating back to the 5th century.

Experts debate meaning of symbols on Pictish stones

The debate continues among archeologists and linguists over the symbols on over 200 carved stones dating to the time of the Picts in Scotland. Archeologists feel that the carvings are "symbolic markings that communicated information."

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

Romans wore socks with sandals

Fibers found on a rusty sandal nail suggest that Romans were wearing socks under their sandals. The sandal was discovered in a dig in North Yorkshire, England.

Major Roman road found in south-eastern Serbia

An eight meter wide, stone block road, dating to the first century, has been discovered near the town of Dimitrovgrad, Serbia. Archaeologists believe the road was part of the Via Militaris, a major Roman military road.

Greek murder victim in "wrong place at wrong time"

Sandra Garvie-Lok really likes her job, even though it requires she help investigate a 1500-year-old murder. The victim, John Doe, is believed to have been a witness to the Slavic invasion of the Greek city of Nemea during the Byzantine era.

Rare Ptolemaic gold coin found in Israel

A large 2,200 year old gold coin has been found in Israel. The coin was issued by Ptolemy Vin 191 BCE and was minted in Egypt.

Archaeological find inspires construction of Iron Age chariot

In 2001 Mike Loades was asked to  "co-ordinate the reconstruction and field-testing of an Iron Age Chariot for a Meet The Ancestors" program on BBC. His documentation of his work is available in PDF format online.

Mayan royal tomb found

The well-sealed tomb of a Mayan king has offered a treasure trove of new information for scholars. Archaeologists at El Zotz in Guatemala found the tomb in May, but kept their discovery secret until recently in an effort to protect the find from looters.

Oxfordshire balloonist spots Bronze Age sites

Drought and extreme heat in England have made it possible to see ancient sites normally hidden by vegetation. Balloonist Michael Wolf saw dark circles in a farmer's field and realized these were evidence of Bronze Age burial mounds.

"Funny signal" leads to one of Britain's largest Roman coin hoards

Archaeologists are marveling over the discovery of "one of the largest ever finds of Roman coins in Britain." Over 52,000 3rd centruy coins were found by hobbyist Dave Crisp buried a foot below the surface of a field near Frome in Somerset, England.

Byzantine mosaics uncovered in Syria

A wide-ranging collection of Byzantine mosaics unearthed in Daraa Province, Syria, now includes works of art from churches and private homes. Human and animal subjects are depicted in scenes of daily life. 

Cannons, not mirrors: Archimedes legend revised

Debunking a legend begun in the Middle Ages, new research suggests Archimedes used steam cannons to set fire to Roman warships. The legend claimed that during the siege of Syracuse, mirrors were used to create a deadly concentration of sunlight that set the ships aflame.

Oldest illuminated Bible found in Ethiopia

Researchers have dated the Garima Gospels to between 350 and 650 CE, making it the oldest known illuminated Christian Bible.

What the Romans (and Greeks) can do for us

Latin teacher and blogger Denis Ambrose, Jr. is often asked to justify his existence to people who think "high school is nothing more than preparation for college, and college is nothing more than job training." He has compiled a list of five pragmatic reasons to study classics.

Did Alexander come to a Styx-y end?

A new speculation about the death of Alexander the Great suggests that the notoriously toxic waters of the River Styx (the modern river Mavroneri) may have taken his life.

No proof Jesus killed on cross, says Christian scholar

The word translated from New Testament Greek as "crucifixion" may more accurately mean something like "suspension," says Gunnar Samuelsson, a Swedish theologian and researcher who describes himself as a "boring pastor."

Cornish find redraws map of Roman Britain

Roman artifacts have been discovered at a fortress in Cornwall formerly believed to be an exclusively Iron Age site. This find revises the historical view of the Roman occupation of Britain, which had been thought not to extend so far southwest.

Carlisle dig provides a "wonderful glimpse into how people lived 2,000 years ago"

Carlisle Castle, one of the most important archaeological digs in northern England, has now been completed, providing experts with a wealth of archaeological evidence to study including armor, leather, pottery, and everyday household items.

Ancient music from Ugarit reconstructed

Working with the earliest musical notation known, Syrian musicologist Ziad Ajjan has composed three pieces from the Ugarit cuneiform tablet known as the "Hymn of Supplication."

Taking another look at Spartan women

In a historically based opinion piece, Jim Arnold offers a new interpretation of the Spartan women's traditional freedoms, which far exceeded those of their female contemporaries in other city-states.

Pyramids offer weathertight camping

America's Finest News Source suggests that the Egyptian pyramids may have been created for accommodation at a weekend camping event in a historic precursor to the SCA.

Gladiator Graveyard

Archaelogists, working at the Driffield Terrace site in York have unearthed some 80 skeletons dating from the 1st through 4th centuries CE.  Based on current evidence, they believe it to be a Gladiator graveyard from the Roman settlement of Eboracum.

World's oldest leather shoe found

Archaeologists have found a leather show dating back 5,500 years in a cave in Armenia. The shoe is cut from one piece of cow leather and sewn together with eyelets.

"Indiana Jones" of brewing recreates ancient New World drink

When Patrick E. McGovern read an article about traces of an "unidentified beverage" being found inside 2800-year-old pottery vessels in Central America, he was inspired to collaborate with the author, anthropologist John Henderson, and eventually to recreate a brew made from cacao beans.

Thousand-page report reveals treasures of Carlisle Roman excavation

A decade later later, the report of the 1999 "Millennuim Dig" at Carlisle describes the tens of thousands of items found at the site. Finds of wooden buildings and leather artifacts surprised the archaeologists, as such materials don't normally survive.

Roman altar stones give insight into religious practices

Archaeologists in Scotland are excited about the discovery of Roman altar stones found in a cricket pavilion in Musselburgh, East Lothian, finding them "the most significant find of their kind in the past 100 years."

Rediscovered Health and Safety report damaging for Odysseus's record

A rediscovered ancient Greek scroll lists a number of health and safety violations by Odysseus during his tenure as ship's captain while returning home from the Trojan War.

Millennium Dig report documents 80,000 Carlisle artifacts

The city of Carlisle, England is now being mentioned in the same breath as York and Newcastle when it comes to Roman archaeology thanks to the Millennium dig. The three-year effort has now been documented in a 936-page report.