601 CE and Earlier

"Colour, bling, excess" at Wroxeter Roman house

A new reconstruction of a Roman house at Wroxeter, England has raised more than a few eyebrows, especially when the bright red and yellow building can be seen from a mile away. (photo)

Researchers hope to learn more about Roman religion

In 1870, Humphrey Senhouse discovered Roman altars at Maryport near Hadrian's Wall, beginning a long debate over the nature of religion in the Roman military. Now excavations at the Camp Farm site may shed new light on the subject.

Stone Age artifacts revered by Vikings

When archaeologists first unearthed Viking graves and ship burials, they dismissed the importance of Stone Age artfacts in much later burials. Now researchers are taking another look, one that seems to suggest the importance of "antiques" in Viking life.

Puddletown Forest reveals Roman "super highway"

Romans often built to impress. This is believed to be the case with a 15 ft (3 m) high, 85 ft (26 m) wide road, built soon after the Roman invasion in the 1st century, that was discovered recently in the Puddletown Forest in Dorset, England. The road originally stretched from London to Exeter.

Early Byzantine church discovered in Israel

Israeli archaeologists are excited over the discovery of a 6th century Byzantine church in the desert southwest of Jerusalem. The small basilica features "exquisitely decorated" mosaic floors.

Late Roman shield patterns online

On his Ancient Military History Site Luke Ueda-Sarson provides links to a wealth of information on ancient Roman and Greek military subjects including section "Late Roman Shield Patterns taken from the Notitia Dignitatum."

Footprint of Roman child found in England

2,000 years ago, a Roman child went skipping through the mud near a Roman fort in Yorkshire, England. In 2010, his or her footprint was found.

African soldier chose retirement in Stratford

Sometime in the 4th century, an Roman soldier of African descent picked Stratford-upon-Avon as a place to retire. The soldier's remains were discovered in 2009.

New film set to spark interest in Hadrian's Wall

The mystery of Rome's "lost legion" has mystified historians for centuries. Now a new young-adult film, along with a redesigned Roman museum, may revive interest in Hadrian's Wall.

Bog body research needed, says Danish scholar

For centuries, scholars have debated the origins of bodies discovered mummified in murky swamps throughout northern Europe spurring calls for further investigation.

Illinois college students to explore "day-to-day life in the Roman courtyside"

A team of Knox College (Galesburg, Illinois) professors and their students will spend the summer studying Tall Dhiban, an archeological site near the modern town of Dhiban in west-central Jordan.

“Shanty town” excavation answers questions about late Roman Britain

Archaeological excavation by a team from the University of Durham in Bowes, England has given reasearchers new insight into civilian life around a Roman fort near the end of the Roman era. The vicus, or “shanty town,” would have survived longer than a military installation.

Romans: coming to a screen near you

Hollywood seems to have a new love affair with Rome, gladiators and soldiers in particular, with the release of The Eagle at theaters and shows such as Spartacus: Gods of the Arena on television. Cary Darling of McClatchy Newspapers has the story.

Colosseum to be restored by shoe manufacturer

Roman officials have accepted an offer from Diego Della Valle, founder of Tod's luxury shoe brand, to fund the restoration of the crumbling Colosseum.

3rd century bathhouses prove Roman social advancement in Syria

The discovery of several luxurious Roman bathhouses in Bosra, Syria demonstrates that the area was an important part of Roman social life in the area, according to Director of Bosra Antiquities Department Wafaa al-Audi.

Celtic beer: more taste, less modern

“These additives gave Celtic beer a completely different taste than what we’re used to today,” said Hans-Peter Stika of the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart about the use of mugwort, carrot seeds or henbane to flavor Iron Age beer.

Byzantine-era burials found in Syria

Archaeologists working at Jabal al-Sin, Syria on the Euphrates River have found cemeteries dating to the era of the Byzantine Empire.

Roman bones found under Jersey church

Contractors working on an extension to a church in Jersey, UK, were surprised to discover human remains during excavation. They were doubly surprised to learn that the remains are from Roman residents of the island.

This week in barley: Two brewing discoveries in Germany

Thousands of charred barley grains have been found in ditches in the early Celtic settlement of Eberdingen-Hochdorf, Germany. The site may have been used to make beer for a nearby religious center.

Irish "giants" more truth than myth

The myth of Irish giants such as Fionn Mac Cumhail may contain a grain of truth, according to a recent genetic study. DNA may show that a strain of gigantism ran through five families in the northern part of the country.

Hadrian’s Wall trench intended as road

Archaeologist Geoff Carter has proposed a controversial new theory concerning the trench that runs south of Hadrian's Wall: It was intended to be a Roman road, linking the forts that were part of the wall complex.

Celtic treasure unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have found gold and amber jewelry in a Celtic tomb near Herbertingen, Germany. They believe the tomb belonged to a noble woman from the area. The tomb is part of a region that was an important Celtic trading center in the 7th-4th centuries BCE.

Do-it-yourself Roman villa on Channel 4

A new series on Great Britain's Channel 4 challenges modern builders to construct a Roman villa using only period tools and materials. The series, Rome Wasn't Built in a Day, begins on Channel 4 on January 20, 2011 at 9pm. (photos)

Ancient Greek dialect spoken in Turkey

Researchers have found an isolated community on the coast of Turkey who speak a dialect of Greek very close to ancient Greek. Romeyka, a variety of Pontic Greek, has grammar and vocabulary that are otherwise only found in ancient forms of the language, but it has no alphabet.

6th century mosaics lead to discovery of Roman city

Sometimes crime does pay, at least when it comes to archaeological discoveries. An illegal 2007 excavation of a home in southeast Turkey has revealed the Roman-era city of Germenicia. (photo)

Lost scenes from Greek plays discovered in Syria

Scenes from ancient Greek plays written by the poet Meander have been found depicted in mosaics in Antioch, Syria. Meander was a comic poet of the 4th century BCE whose popularity in the Roman world was exceeded only by Homer.

Roman farm found in Suffolk

Archaeologists working on the site of a new school in Lowestoft, England, believe they have discovered the remains of a 1st century Roman farm where a family of 12 might have lived.

Antikythera mechanism re-created using Lego Technic building set

Two thousand years ago, the Greeks built a mechanical computer to calculate eclipse dates with surprising accuracy. A modern-day historian has created a working replica of the device using Lego Technic building blocks.

Artifacts prove Welsh city's importance in Roman society

This Christmas, locals and visitors to Aberystwyth, Wales will be treated to a display of 4th century Roman artifacts at the Ceredigion Museum. The pieces were most likely owned by a wealthy landowner.

Holy Thorn of Glastonbury vandalized

Police in Glastonbury, England are looking for vandals who cut the branches from the Holy Thorn, a 2,000-year-old tree said to have been planted by Joseph of Arimathea. (video)