601 CE and Earlier

Ancient winery found at Byzantine fortress

A two-room winery, dating from the time of the Byzantine Emperors Anastasius I (491-518 CE), and Justinian I (527-565 CE), has been discovered at the Byzantine fortress near the town of Byala on the Black Sea.

Roman helmet expected to bring large sum in Christie's auction

Bidders, get your checkbooks ready... A late first century Roman helmet is scheduled to be auctioned October 7, 2010 by Christie's Auction House. Predicted cost: US$242,000 to $363,000. (photo)

Analysis of pills gives insight into Roman medicine

A geneticist has analyzed some Roman pills found in a shipwreck off Italy 20 years ago. The pills date to the 2nd century BCE and were found inside a wooden medical kit.

"Significant" Roman find in Caistor, England

Archaeologists excavating a derelict pub in Caistor, England say they have a "significant" find with the discovery of a 4th century Roman cemetery containing over forty bodies. Orientation and lack of grave goods leads experts to believe the burials were Christian.

Ancient bog road puzzles archaeologists

Archaeologists are trying to discover the exact purpose of an oak timber road found in the Bord na Móna bog in Tipperary, Ireland.

Early period trading vessels found off Italian coast

A small fleet of trading vessels, dating from the 5th-7th centuries, has been found off the coast of the Italian island of Zannone. Evidence of the ships' cargoes was also discovered.

Roman lantern found in England

An intact Roman lantern has been found in a farm field in Sudbury, Suffolk, England. The lantern is made of bronze and dates to between the 1st and 3rd centuy CE.

Roman industrial estate found in North Yorkshire

Archaeologists working on a dig in North Yorkshire, England have discovered a Roman industrial estate believed to have been used by the Ninth Hispanic legion.

A Python goes to gladiator school

Terry Jones, of Monty Python fame, takes on the persona of Roman gladiator to learn about training from the experts. (video)

Roman governor's villa fit for an emperor

When it was built in the 2nd century, Lullingstone villa was the height of luxury for its owner, Publius Helvius Pertinax, a former Roman Emperor and Governor of Britain. Now the site is one of the best examples of Roman villas in the country. (photos)

Archeological goldmine found during Sofia subway build

The construction of a new metro line in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, has unearthed some marvels including major sections of Serdica, the Roman city and vacation site for Constantine the Great.

Dogs of the Ancient World

Archaeology Magazine takes an in-depth look at the history of dogs, from Ancient Greece to Mesoamerica to Medieval Europe.

French Gallo-Roman sanctuary is archaeologists' dream

Archaeologists working near the ancient site of Vindunum  (now Le Mans, France) have found an "exceptional discovery," a vast complex of temples dating to the first through third centuries C.E.

Time Team hopes to find Boudica's hometown

Archaeologists, including a team from Channel 4's Time Team, are set to sift through layers of history in search of evidence linking the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, near Norwich, England, to the settlement of East Anglia's Iceni queen Boudica.

5th century Buddhist temple found in Afghanistan

Amidst the fighting south of Kabul, Afghanistan, comes a bright spot: the discovery of a Buddhist-era temple dating back to the 5th century.

Experts debate meaning of symbols on Pictish stones

The debate continues among archeologists and linguists over the symbols on over 200 carved stones dating to the time of the Picts in Scotland. Archeologists feel that the carvings are "symbolic markings that communicated information."

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

Romans wore socks with sandals

Fibers found on a rusty sandal nail suggest that Romans were wearing socks under their sandals. The sandal was discovered in a dig in North Yorkshire, England.

Major Roman road found in south-eastern Serbia

An eight meter wide, stone block road, dating to the first century, has been discovered near the town of Dimitrovgrad, Serbia. Archaeologists believe the road was part of the Via Militaris, a major Roman military road.

Greek murder victim in "wrong place at wrong time"

Sandra Garvie-Lok really likes her job, even though it requires she help investigate a 1500-year-old murder. The victim, John Doe, is believed to have been a witness to the Slavic invasion of the Greek city of Nemea during the Byzantine era.

Rare Ptolemaic gold coin found in Israel

A large 2,200 year old gold coin has been found in Israel. The coin was issued by Ptolemy Vin 191 BCE and was minted in Egypt.

Archaeological find inspires construction of Iron Age chariot

In 2001 Mike Loades was asked to  "co-ordinate the reconstruction and field-testing of an Iron Age Chariot for a Meet The Ancestors" program on BBC. His documentation of his work is available in PDF format online.

Mayan royal tomb found

The well-sealed tomb of a Mayan king has offered a treasure trove of new information for scholars. Archaeologists at El Zotz in Guatemala found the tomb in May, but kept their discovery secret until recently in an effort to protect the find from looters.

Oxfordshire balloonist spots Bronze Age sites

Drought and extreme heat in England have made it possible to see ancient sites normally hidden by vegetation. Balloonist Michael Wolf saw dark circles in a farmer's field and realized these were evidence of Bronze Age burial mounds.

"Funny signal" leads to one of Britain's largest Roman coin hoards

Archaeologists are marveling over the discovery of "one of the largest ever finds of Roman coins in Britain." Over 52,000 3rd centruy coins were found by hobbyist Dave Crisp buried a foot below the surface of a field near Frome in Somerset, England.

Byzantine mosaics uncovered in Syria

A wide-ranging collection of Byzantine mosaics unearthed in Daraa Province, Syria, now includes works of art from churches and private homes. Human and animal subjects are depicted in scenes of daily life. 

Cannons, not mirrors: Archimedes legend revised

Debunking a legend begun in the Middle Ages, new research suggests Archimedes used steam cannons to set fire to Roman warships. The legend claimed that during the siege of Syracuse, mirrors were used to create a deadly concentration of sunlight that set the ships aflame.

Oldest illuminated Bible found in Ethiopia

Researchers have dated the Garima Gospels to between 350 and 650 CE, making it the oldest known illuminated Christian Bible.

What the Romans (and Greeks) can do for us

Latin teacher and blogger Denis Ambrose, Jr. is often asked to justify his existence to people who think "high school is nothing more than preparation for college, and college is nothing more than job training." He has compiled a list of five pragmatic reasons to study classics.

Did Alexander come to a Styx-y end?

A new speculation about the death of Alexander the Great suggests that the notoriously toxic waters of the River Styx (the modern river Mavroneri) may have taken his life.