601 CE and Earlier

Roman "savings bank" discovered in Colchester

"What you're looking at is how somebody managed their savings, taking some out and putting some back in probably over a number of years," said Philip Crummy from the Colchester Archaeological Trust about the recent discovery of over 1200 Roman coins in two clay pots.

[ATL] Roman Garb Workshop

Roman garb is easy, easy, easy, and extremely comfortable in the heat, but if you want to do it right, we have the workshop for you, taught by Lady Iohanna filia Iacobi.

Bog begets barrel of butter

Workers extracting turf from a bog in Galway, Ireland have found a wooden keg full of butter. The butter could be as much as 2,500 years old.

Ancient wine found in China

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000 year old wine jug in Henan Province, China. The copper pot, sealed by centuries of rust, still has liquid in it.

The magnificent Aya Sofya

Undoubtedly, one of the greatest places of worship in history is the Aya Sofya, also known as Hagia Sophia or “Church of the Holy Wisdom.” Located in İstanbul, the church is visited by over two million tourists a year. Terry Richardson of Today's Zaman offers a history. (photo)

Roman plain yields ancient ship

“It’s a unique find. At that depth, we have never found a ship," said Anna Maria Moretti, archaeological superintendent for Rome and Ostia, about the discovery of a wooden vessel 4 meters beneath the ground near the modern city of Ostia.

Coptic nuns deface Egyptian temple

The Egyptian gods must have been angry when 6th century Coptic nuns used the walls of their temple for personal comments. The graffiti has been discovered at the 3200-year-old temple at Abydos.

Archaeologists excavate murder in Roman England

Archaeologists have excavated the body of a young woman that they believe was killed by a Roman sword. She was found hastily buried in a shallow grave, indicating she may have been murdered.

Lusoria Rhenana set to sail in Germany

A group of Roman history enthusiasts in Germany have constructed a replica of a Roman military riverboat. The Lusoria Rhenana is scheduled to take her maiden voyage in the summer of 2011 near Woerth-am-Rhein.

Bath: "a knockout site"

On a recent tour of English Heritage sites, Charlotte Higgins of the Guardian visited the newly revamped Roman Baths Museum in Bath, England. She blogged her impressions.

Large Roman "industrial estate" found in Rockingham Forest

A Roman industrial site has been discovered near Peterborough in the Rockingham Forest. The site is believed to be "one of the largest archaeological sites in England."

Roman spearmen found beneath Hyderabad Barracks

The remains of two Roman soldiers, dating to the 4th or 5th century CE, have been discovered beneath the former Hyderabad Barracks in Colchester, England.

History beneath your feet

The planned construction of a new building at Lincoln College in Lincolnshire, England, has led to the discovery of a wealth of artifacts dating to Roman and medieval periods.

Roman poem object of climate change study

Medieval history professor Michael McCormick has spent a great deal of time investigating documentation of climate change in medieval records. Now he turns his attention to the late Roman Empire.

Roman mausoleum found under garbarge dump

Police clearing out an illegal garbage dump near Naples, Italy have found a 2,000 year old mausoleum buried under tons of garbage. Once the entrance was cleared, police found carved marble and other decorations.

Grants and donations will keep archaeological treasures in the UK

Grants from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund charity, as well as public donations, will keep recent archaeological treasures in the United Kingdom. Funds of over UK£1 million will allow such items as a hoard of Roman coins and four gold Iron Age torcs to be acquired by local museums.

Roman quarry "too obvious" for notice

Archaeologist Karl-James Langford believes historians may have overlooked a Roman quarry in Barry, Wales because it was just "too obvious."

Late Roman graves discovered in Canterbury

Archaeologists have discovered a cemetery, dating to the late Roman period, is the St. Dunstan's area of Canterbury, England. They believe, due to the placement of the bodies and lack of grave goods, that the burials were Christian.

Leprosy, battle wounds found in early medieval cemetery

The scull of a leper who died fighting is one of several interesting burials identified at an Italian cemetery used between 500 and 700 CE. The cemetery likely contains remains of Germanic Lombards or Avars.

6th century Ethiopian manuscript identified in Minnesota

A theology student has discovered the second-oldest known Ethiopic Old Testament at Saint John’s University in Minnesota (USA). The manuscript dates to the 6th century.

Rainy day prompts "chance discovery" of Roman inscription

A rainy day visit by a family to Roman sites in northern England has led to the discovery of an inscribed sandstone fragment dating to Roman times. Lisa Langford spotted the stone after it had been uncovered by heavy rains.

"Small things surpass large" in Ravenna mosaics

"The marble flourishes with bright rays and all the stones in starry purple shine richly. Small things confined in space are made so beautiful that they surpass the large. To Christ, whose temples exist in the human heart, nothing is small and he dwells happily confined by these walls." Latin inscription at chapel entrance. (photo)

"Jewel in the crown of Libya's Roman legacy" still intact

Archaeologists have feared the worst for Libya's Roman cultural heritage during the recent unrest in the country, but so far, sites such as Leptis Magna the "jewel in the crown" of Libya's Roman legacy, are unharmed.

Ikea does Stonehenge

For all those who have struggled to put together an Ikea desk... Ikea does Stonehenge!

Welsh school site hides rare Roman fort

The playing fields of Dwr-y-Felin Comprehensive Upper School in Neath, Wales must occupy a strategic location since they were the site of not one, but two Roman forts, a 1st century timber structure and a later stone fort.

Atlantis found at last?

For the first time in several years, archaeologists believe they have located the lost continent of Atlantis. The latest theory is the subject of a new television film on the National Geographic Channel entitled Finding Atlantis.

Did wicker help build Stonehenge?

For thousands of years, experts have debated how the huge stones that constitute Stonehenge were transported from Wales to their current site in southern England. Now engineer Garry Lavin has a new theory: wicker. (photo)

"Colour, bling, excess" at Wroxeter Roman house

A new reconstruction of a Roman house at Wroxeter, England has raised more than a few eyebrows, especially when the bright red and yellow building can be seen from a mile away. (photo)

Researchers hope to learn more about Roman religion

In 1870, Humphrey Senhouse discovered Roman altars at Maryport near Hadrian's Wall, beginning a long debate over the nature of religion in the Roman military. Now excavations at the Camp Farm site may shed new light on the subject.

Stone Age artifacts revered by Vikings

When archaeologists first unearthed Viking graves and ship burials, they dismissed the importance of Stone Age artfacts in much later burials. Now researchers are taking another look, one that seems to suggest the importance of "antiques" in Viking life.