601 CE and Earlier

Forum focus of new dig at Caistor St Edmund

Dr. Will Bowden, associate professor of Roman archaeology at the University of Nottingham, has begun a new dig at he site of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund, this time in search of a Roman forum and an Anglo-Saxon town.

Roman jar stumps experts

Canadian experts are stumped after reconstructing a 3rd century Roman jar "riddled with tiny holes." The jar is part of the collection of the Museum of Ontario Archaeology. (photo)

Museum of London hosts gladiator games

Sports enthusiasts flocked to London to cheer for the latest specticle of athletic prowess recently when the Museum of London hosted a face off between Londinium and Camulodunum - their gladiators, that is. The competition took place at the city's Guildhall, site of the Roman amphitheatre. (photo)

Devon discovery could "rewrite the history of the Romans in Britain"

The discovery of the largest Roman settlement ever found in Devon, England began when two metal detectorists found nearly a hundred Roman coins near Exeter. The find resulted in a geophysical survey which uncovered the large settlement.

Ancient farmstead may have supplied Roman troops

Archaeologists and volunteers in Sheffield, England have discovered the remains of a high-status Roman farm which, they believe may have provided "farm produce to the Roman supply network." The farm dates to the 2nd century.

Saxon logboat on display in Portsmouth

Visitors to the Portsmouth City Museum will be able to view the remains of a 6th century Saxon logboat found in Langstone Harbour in 2003. (photo)

"Sophisticated" Roman village found at Northamptonshire construction site

Excavations of a construction site in Burton Latimer, in Northamptonshire, England, have unearthed nearly 40kg of Roman pottery, ironwork, and the remains of 30 Romans, leading experts to believe that the site was once a wealthy Roman village.

Roman child's grave found in Dorchester

Wessex Archaeology has been called in to oversee archaeological activities at the Charles Street development in Dorchester, England after the discovery of a child's grave dating to Roman times.

Discovery of coins pushes boundary of Roman England westward

A cache of Roman coins found by metal detectorists has lead to the discovery of a large Roman settlement near Devon, England. This pushes the known boundaries of the Roman empire in England further west.

"Mysterious" medieval sites included in AOL list

AOL has published a slideshow of "11 Bizarre and Mysterious Historical Sites," including several from the Middle Ages. (photos)

"Unexpected but important " Roman find in Bedford, England

Workers at a construction site in Bedford, England recently discovered a section of wall dating to Roman times. Further discoveries included roofing tiles, floor tiles and pottery, leading experts to believe the artifacts belonged to a Roman villa.

Saint Philip's tomb discovered in Turkey

Archaeologists working in Pamukkale, Turkey believe they have found the tomb of St. Philip the Apostle. Pamukkale is the modern name of the ancient city of Hierapolis where Philip was killed.

Pict Persona

Looking for any information on the Picts (who lived in northern Pre-Scottland) aside from Wikipedia. Theories on language are very welcome. :) Thank you.

Hikers bewitched by Bath

The folks at Lonely Planet feel that the best way to appreciate the old Roman and Regency city of Bath, England is from above, as in the 10km Skyline Walk which traverses the hills that surround the city.

"Beer Archaeologist" adds ancient flair to modern brews

The August 2011 issue of Smithsonian Magazine features alengthy article on "Beer Archaeologist" Patrick McGovern whose series of books examines the history of the brew. The article is written by Abigail Tucker.

Fresco of St. Paul found in Naples catacombs

A 6th century fresco of St. Paul has been discovered in the Catacombs of San Gennaro in Naples during restoration work according to L'Osservatore, the official Vatican newspaper. (photo)

A gladiator's final bout

On PRI's radio program The World, host Lisa Mullins interviews Roman history professor Michael Carter, of Brock University in Ontario, about the life and death of Roman gladiator Diodorus, who died in the 3rd century CE.

Banging heads in Asterix comics

European academics are concerned about the amount of violent brain traumas in the popular Asterix comics series, most dealt out by Asterix and Obelix themselves.

Round huts found at Vindolanda

The stream of interesting archaeological finds continues at Vindolanda, the Roman fort at Hadrian's Wall near Hexham, England, with the discovery of dozens of circular huts.

Plans announced for visitor center at Camp Farm

Camp Farm in Maryport, Cumbria, England hopes to be the site of a world-class tourist attraction showcasing "the area’s strong Roman heritage and recent archeological finds." Hadrian’s Wall Heritage Ltd has applied for UK£10.7m to build the center.

Lead coffins found in Roman city

Two sarcophagii made of lead have been found at the site of the ancient city of Gabii in Italy. The caskets date to the 1st or 2nd century CE.

6th century Byzantine building found in Acre

Israeli archaeologists have discovered the remains of a 6th century Byzantine public building in the ancient town of Akko (Acre). The discovery is the first physical evidence found of the Christian Bishop of Akko.

A Roman "what's-it?"

We know it's Roman, but what the heck is it? That's the question being asked by archaeologists about a Roman dodecahedron dating from the 2nd-3rd century and found throughout Roman Europe. (photo)

Edward Jenner's garden holds historic secrets

Archaeologists from the University of Bristol are digging up Edward Jenner's garden, not seeking evidence of the 18th century British scientist, but secrets much older, including a skeleton dating to Roman times.

Vote online for grant to build replica Roman fort in UK

Roman-era reenactors who operate a tour company in the UK are seeking online and cellphone votes to help them secure a UK£50,000 grant to construct a replica Roman fortress.

Roman "savings bank" discovered in Colchester

"What you're looking at is how somebody managed their savings, taking some out and putting some back in probably over a number of years," said Philip Crummy from the Colchester Archaeological Trust about the recent discovery of over 1200 Roman coins in two clay pots.

[ATL] Roman Garb Workshop

Roman garb is easy, easy, easy, and extremely comfortable in the heat, but if you want to do it right, we have the workshop for you, taught by Lady Iohanna filia Iacobi.

Bog begets barrel of butter

Workers extracting turf from a bog in Galway, Ireland have found a wooden keg full of butter. The butter could be as much as 2,500 years old.

Ancient wine found in China

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000 year old wine jug in Henan Province, China. The copper pot, sealed by centuries of rust, still has liquid in it.

The magnificent Aya Sofya

Undoubtedly, one of the greatest places of worship in history is the Aya Sofya, also known as Hagia Sophia or “Church of the Holy Wisdom.” Located in İstanbul, the church is visited by over two million tourists a year. Terry Richardson of Today's Zaman offers a history. (photo)