601 CE and Earlier

Oldest wine cellar discovered

Israeli and American archaeologists have uncovered what may have been the world's oldest wine cellar in the Galilee, Business Standard reports. The cellar is estimated to be about 3,700 years old and to have held up to 2,000 liters of strong, sweet wine.

Archaeologists ponder Swedish "murder mystery"

"It's like Pompeii: Something terrible happened, and everything just stopped," said Helene Wilhelmson, a researcher from Sweden's Lund University about the recent discovery of a well-preserved fort on the island of Öland, just off the Swedish coast, which contained a number of skeletons.

Roman skulls unearthed by "lost" London river

The Walborn River used to run through London until it was paved over in the 15th century. Recently the river made it's presence known when 20 skulls, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, were discovered washed from a Roman burial site.

Horse and rider return to Mildenhall

In 1997, the remains of an Anglo Saxon warrior and his horse were discovered, along with over 400 other graves, at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England. Now the horse and rider have come home for display at the Mildenhall Museum.

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

3rd century shop found at Roman Maryport

Archaeologists working at Roman Maryport, along Hadrian's Wall, have discovered evidence of six buildings and a road. One of the buildings is believed to have been a Roman shop.

Roman Child's Lead Coffin Unearthed

Dating to about the third century CE, a small lead coffin was recently unearthed in Leicestershire, England. It is presumed to be a Christian burial due to its east-west orientation and is less than a meter long. (photo, video)

Stonehenge's "Avenue" discovered

Archaeologists have long known of the existence of the "Avenue," an ancient pathway leading to Stonehenge, but a modern road had obscured it. Now workers dismantling the A344 have found two ditches believed to be remnants of the original approach.

Roman chainmail found in Harzhorn

German archaeologists are excited by the discovery of well-preserved Roman chainmail during excavations near Kalefeld in the Northeim district north of Göttingen, the first such armor recovered from a Roman-Germanic battlefield. (photo)

"The greatest hall under heaven" unearthed in Denmark

Much of the action in the epic poem Beowulf takes place in the great hall. Now archaeologists in Denmark believe they have discovered the great royal feasting hall described in the poem as "the greatest hall under heaven."

"Traditional methods" used to preserve Hadrian's Wall

"Hadrian's Wall is under constant pressure from the weather, from visitors, from livestock and other factors, and we need to work hard to protect and to conserve this icon of world heritage," said Bryan Scott, from the Hadrian's Wall Trust about the recent grant to rebuild parts of the wall.

Technology traces Roman beads to Egypt

A team of scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany has analyzed glass beads found in former Rhaetian settlements in Bavaria, and concluded that the beads, dating from the 1st through 4th centuries, must have originated "somewhere near a soda lake like those in Wadi El Natrun in Egypt." (photo)

Shropshire ring declared treasure

The coroner in Shropshire, England has declared 6th century gold ring, found by a metal detectorist, treasure. The ring, which weighs 8.21g (0.3oz), probably belonged to an individual of high status. (photo)

Aspendos Gladiator School closing in Turkey

There will be unemployed gladiators pounding the streets of Antalya, Turkey after the closing of the Aspendos Gladiator School, where modern-day gladiators entertained tourists. The company cited "a poor tourism season" as the reason for the closing.

Portsmouth Roman well stumps experts

The discovery of a Roman well beneath a garden in Portsmouth, England has left archaeologists intrigued - and puzzled. The well contained Roman coins, a bronze ring, and the skeletons of eight dogs. (photo)

Roman temple near Hadrian's Wall identified

The remains of a building near Hadrian's Wall, dating to the second century and first unearthed in the 1880s by a local archaeologist, have been identified as a Roman temple. The temple is the most north western classical temple from the Roman world yet discovered.

Archaeologists wish for project to protect Roman mosaics

Nearly 50 years ago, archaeologists uncovered a pair of beautiful mosaic floors, dating to the Roman era, at Chedworth Villa in Gloucestershire, England. Now the floors have been uncovered for study, leading to a discussion of a permanent building to house them. (photo)

High-class tableware among finds at Ewell site

Roman Ewell, in Surrey, England, was once located along the Stane Street, between London and Chichester, and acted as a market center, suppling travelers with accommodations and food for their journeys. Now the Church Meadow Project is taking a look at the 2nd century site and what it can tell experts about its history. (photos)

Late Roman well offers insight into technology

A well-preserved, late-Roman well near Heslington, England demonstrates use of the latest technology of the time, including curved stone facings and a dish-shaped base. Archaeologists from the University of York believe the well had "significance in contemporary local agricultural cycles and fertility practices."

Lottery money to help Chester Farm

2,000 years of English history will be open for study thanks to a UK£4m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore and investigate various sites at Chester Farm, in Irchester, England.

The color of the Colosseum

A restoration of the Colosseum, currently underway, reveals frescos in a corridor that has been sealed off since the 3rd century. Unlike the moss-and-marble walls of today, the building interior, in its day, would have been a Technicolor extravaganza.

R.I.P. Lucius Valerius Geminus

Lucius Valerius Geminus is dead. In fact, he's been dead since the 1st century CE, but thanks to the discovery of his tombstone, archaeologists now know something about the Roman soldier who died in Oxfordshire.

Ancient horseshoe found stuck in a rut

Potholes may be a modern annoyance, but the recent discovery of a Roman horseshoe stuck in a rut shows that the problem is ages old. The 2000-year-old show was discovered recently under Liverpool Street in London. (photo)

Medicine: From Galen to Saturday Night Live

In an article for the website Inside Higher Ed, Scott McLemee looks at the contributions of Roman physician Galen, upon whose work most medieval medicine was based. The writer begins his story with a look at Steve Martin's portrayal of medieval doctor Theodoric of York on Saturday Night Live. (video)

Roman cemetery at Glevum excavated

Experts from Cotswold Archaeology have discovered a number of new burials in what they believe was the cemetery for the Roman city of Glevum, now Gloucester. "This is probably one of the most significant finds that has been made within Gloucester within the last 30 years. It will add greatly to the knowledge of the [city]," said archaeologists Stuart Joyce.

Latin alive and well in the cyber world

Latin, formerly known as the "dead language," seems to be alive and kicking in the digital age, according to a recent article in the Economist. Five words can often say more than ten English ones, notes David Butterfield, a Latinist at the University of Cambridge, making the language ideal for Twitter.

Roman wall discovered in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Museum in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered the remains of a 5th century Roman wall near the regional broadcasting centre of Bulgarian National Radio and Bulgarian National Television.

Lincoln Castle may hide Roman townhouse

The Lincolnshire County Council is sponsoring the restoration of Lincoln Castle in England. So far, archaeologists have found the remains of the Norman foundations of the castle and a previously-unknown Anglo-Saxon church. They expect to reach the Roman era soon in which they expect to find a Roman townhouse.

Welsh site spans Roman and medieval periods

The time between when the Romans left Britain and the medieval period began has usually been considered a dark age lacking in civilization, but a new archaeological discovery in Caernarfon, Wales may help to fill in the gaps.

Elizabeth Greene shares an "Academic Minute" on Roman shoes

A recent "Academic Minute" from WAMC, Northeast Public Radio, features Dr. Elizabeth Greene of Western University in London, Canada, on the topic of Roman shoes, and what they can tell us about the lives of people in Roman Britain.