601 CE and Earlier

Keeping current on Stonehenge

It's been a momentous year for experts at Stonehenge, as well as those who visit the Neolithic monument, including the grand opening of its new visitor center. The Culture24 blog offers a wrapup of 2013 for the world Heritage site. (photos, map)

Ogham stones digitized in 3D

The iconic Ogham stones of Ireland are being digitized in 3D using Artec Studio 9 software thanks to the partnership of The Discovery Programme and the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. The stones, bearing the Irish Ogham alphabet, will now be available to view in 3D online. (photos)

Scottish hillfort speaks of post-Roman unrest

A team of archaeologists from Rampart Scotland has discovered evidence of a post-Roman hillfort at Sheriffside, 20 miles to the east of Edinburgh, Scotland. Experts believe that the fort, and its 2.80m deep ditch, were constructed to defend against frequent raids by Scots and Picts against local tribes.

Antonine Wall to benefit from Historic Scotland 5-year plan

Central Scotland's Antonine Wall has never enjoyed the reputation as a tourist destination that its southern cousin, Hadrian’s Wall, has had, but a new 5-year plan proposed by Historic Scotland may change that fact. The development plan provides a "framework" for conservation and promotion.

Celtic coins to remain in Jersey thanks to UK£738,000 government grant

In 2012, Reg Mead and Richard Miles discovered a hoard of 70,000 Celtic coins in a field on the island of Jersey. Now a grant of UK£738,000 will allow the UK£10m treasure to remain on the island.

Byzantine monastery to become mosque

The 5th century Byzantium Monastery of Stoudios in Istanbul, Turkey is scheduled to become a mosque after renovation concludes in 2014. The site will be renamed İmrahor İlyas Bey Mosque.

Pope Francis displays bones of St. Peter

For the first time ever, the relics of St. Peter, discovered in the necropolis under St. Peter's Basilica in 1939, were displayed during mass, and prayed over by the Pope. The relices include nine pieces of bone. (photos)

Researchers create "virtual villa" using video game technology

Researchers at Indiana University, leading an international collaborative team, have used the Unity 3D game engine to create an interactive digital model of Hadrian's Villa, a Roman ruin located near Tivoli, Italy, for research and educational purposes.

Might Roman ring have inspired Tolkien?

The history of a stolen Roman ring and its discovery in the 18th century are the subject of a recent feature article in History Today by Lynn Forest-Hill, fellow of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Culture, University of Southampton, theorizing that the ring may have been the inspiration for J.R.R. Tolkien. (photos)

Leicestershire lead coffin opened

A team of experts from Archaeology Warwickshire and York University have opened the 1,700-year-old lead coffin discovered recently near Hinckley, England, and have begun examination of its contents.

Galen: Prince of Medicine book reviewed

The online site for History Today recently featured a book review by Andrew Robinson for The Prince of Medicine: Galen in the Roman Empire by Susan P. Mattern.

Plans considered to unearth Roman baths in Exeter

The Dean of Exeter Cathedral in England is consulting with English Heritage about possible plans to make the Roman baths under Cathedral Green more accessible to the public. The baths were first discovered in 1971.

Touring Roman Britain

Jolyon Attwooll has compiled a list of the "must-see" sites of Roman Britain for a recent article in the Telegraph. The article includes photos, descriptions and links of some of the best tourist spots in the country.

University of Southampton receives grant to study Roman ports

The European Research Council has awarded the University of Southampton a EU€2.49m (UK£2.1m) grant to study 31 roman ports in nine countries. The study will focus on ports in the Mediterranean region during the first two centuries CE.

Roman eagle: one of the "finest artefacts ever unearthed in Britain"

An “exceptional” sculpture of a Roman eagle has been discovered in London. The statue, dating to the 1st or 2nd century, is made of Cotswold limestone and depicts an eagle with a snake in its mouth. (photo, video)

Newborough dig may stall energy construction

Archaeological digs on a farm near Newborough, England have unearthed several layers of history from Roman to Saxon times. The excavations were commissioned before the land could be used for proposed renewable energy parks.

Wooden pillars puzzle experts in Old Uppsala

Archaeologists working on the site of a railway line in Old Uppsala, Sweden are trying to puzzle out the purpose of two rows of large wooden pillars near a 5th century pre-Viking burial ground and religious center. (photos)

Oldest wine cellar discovered

Israeli and American archaeologists have uncovered what may have been the world's oldest wine cellar in the Galilee, Business Standard reports. The cellar is estimated to be about 3,700 years old and to have held up to 2,000 liters of strong, sweet wine.

Archaeologists ponder Swedish "murder mystery"

"It's like Pompeii: Something terrible happened, and everything just stopped," said Helene Wilhelmson, a researcher from Sweden's Lund University about the recent discovery of a well-preserved fort on the island of Öland, just off the Swedish coast, which contained a number of skeletons.

Roman skulls unearthed by "lost" London river

The Walborn River used to run through London until it was paved over in the 15th century. Recently the river made it's presence known when 20 skulls, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, were discovered washed from a Roman burial site.

Horse and rider return to Mildenhall

In 1997, the remains of an Anglo Saxon warrior and his horse were discovered, along with over 400 other graves, at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England. Now the horse and rider have come home for display at the Mildenhall Museum.

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

3rd century shop found at Roman Maryport

Archaeologists working at Roman Maryport, along Hadrian's Wall, have discovered evidence of six buildings and a road. One of the buildings is believed to have been a Roman shop.

Roman Child's Lead Coffin Unearthed

Dating to about the third century CE, a small lead coffin was recently unearthed in Leicestershire, England. It is presumed to be a Christian burial due to its east-west orientation and is less than a meter long. (photo, video)

Stonehenge's "Avenue" discovered

Archaeologists have long known of the existence of the "Avenue," an ancient pathway leading to Stonehenge, but a modern road had obscured it. Now workers dismantling the A344 have found two ditches believed to be remnants of the original approach.

Roman chainmail found in Harzhorn

German archaeologists are excited by the discovery of well-preserved Roman chainmail during excavations near Kalefeld in the Northeim district north of Göttingen, the first such armor recovered from a Roman-Germanic battlefield. (photo)

"The greatest hall under heaven" unearthed in Denmark

Much of the action in the epic poem Beowulf takes place in the great hall. Now archaeologists in Denmark believe they have discovered the great royal feasting hall described in the poem as "the greatest hall under heaven."

"Traditional methods" used to preserve Hadrian's Wall

"Hadrian's Wall is under constant pressure from the weather, from visitors, from livestock and other factors, and we need to work hard to protect and to conserve this icon of world heritage," said Bryan Scott, from the Hadrian's Wall Trust about the recent grant to rebuild parts of the wall.

Technology traces Roman beads to Egypt

A team of scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany has analyzed glass beads found in former Rhaetian settlements in Bavaria, and concluded that the beads, dating from the 1st through 4th centuries, must have originated "somewhere near a soda lake like those in Wadi El Natrun in Egypt." (photo)

Shropshire ring declared treasure

The coroner in Shropshire, England has declared 6th century gold ring, found by a metal detectorist, treasure. The ring, which weighs 8.21g (0.3oz), probably belonged to an individual of high status. (photo)