Middle Eastern

Cultures of the Middle Eastern lands, such as the Ottoman Empire, Egypt, Israel, and Arabia

Nuremberg Mahzor on display at the Israel Museum

In celebration of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish new Year, officials at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem are displaying the Nuremberg Mahzor, a 14th century collection of "handwritten Ashkenazi, or northern European, prayers and liturgical poems." The manuscript is considered the largest surviving text of its kind with only 7 of its 528 pages missing.

Genetic studies show crusaders influenced religion in Lebanon

A new study shows that some Lebanese men carry genes traceable to Western Europe, a heritage, say researchers, from Crusaders who established settlements and castles in the country in the 11th through 13th centuries.

5th century Byzantine cathedral and human remains found in Syria

An early Byzantine cathedral, complete with columns and stairs, has been discovered by the excavation team in Tal Al-Hasaka site in north eastern Syria. Also found was the "skeleton of a human who died of torture."

First known Jewish temple found in Lycia

Archaeologists excavating the ancient port city of Andriake in Lycia have discovered what they believe is the "first archaeological trace of Jewish culture" found in the area. They believe the temple was one of the earliest built after a 212 C.E. law allowed Jews to become Roman citizen.

[ATL] Midnight at the Oasis

Sandy winds are blowing from the west, the palm trees are swaying, and the midday sun is beating down on our heads. The smell of falafel is wafting from the fires. That seems to be all they feed us, falafel day after day falafel, falafel, falafel ... sheeez.

Archaeologists search for the tomb of Suleiman I

A team of Hungarian and Turkish experts has begun the search for the tomb of Suleiman I, the Lawgiver, who died in Hungary in 1566.

8th century Islamic vase links Japan to the Silk Road

Researchers in Nara, Japan are excited by the discovery of shards from an Islamic vase dating to the 8th century at the former location of the Heijokyo palace.

[ATL] Post Pennsic: One More Night at the Casbah

The Barony of Storvik, jewel of Atlantia, invites you to join them for a day of Eastern Arts, fun, and frivolity at their Post Pennsic Dessert Revel, or, One More Night at the Casbah.

Ageless Artifice

This company sells body care products (salves, powders, etc.) made from original historical recipes and packaged in reproduction containers. Each item comes with the original recipe.

North American Frame Drum Association to hold workshop in October

NAFDA, the North American Frame Drum Association, will sponsor a workshop featuring drummers from around the world on October 17, 2009 in North Hollywood, California.

[MER] All Things Middle Eastern XI

Shire Brantestone Proudly Presents All Things Middle Eastern XI June 12th thru June 14th, 2009 Camp Meadowbrook, 2344 County Rd 747 Cullman, Alabama 35058

[ART] Dragons Tear XXV

Once again it is time for our Shire Heavy Championship at Dragons Tear. But before any can say it is just another event, please keep in mind that this year’s event will mark Dragon Tear’s Silver Anniversary. In keeping with past tradition, our meal package will include a Friday evening soup kitchen, a wonderful breakfast with a refreshing lunch on Saturday followed by our delectable feast that will be outlined below. On Sunday morning, we will have food set out for those who want to forge for a bite before breaking camp.

Tulips brought to Europe by the Turks

New research by experts at the University of Cordoba and the School of Arabic Studies seems to indicate that the first tulips in Europe were brought to Islamic Spain by way of Byzantium. The bulbs could then have been brought to Holland, where they became the country's symbol.

Peacock and pomegranates subject of Byzantine painting

An archaeological team working near Salqin, Syria have discovered a large painting dating to the Byzantine era. The work depicts a large peacock (a symbol of the early church), two pomegranates, a small bird and olive trees. (photo)

NAFDA West

NAFDA, the North American Frame Drum Association, will sponsor a workshop featuring drummers from around the world on October 17, 2009 in North Hollywood, California.

[ART] Middle Eastern War

Join us among the fantastic red rocks of Southern Utah as we celebrate the Medieval Middle East.

Crusader castle project could prove value of new technologies

Archaeologist Katharina Galor believes technology might just help eliminate hours of tedious recording and cataloging during a dig, and she plans to test her theory at Apollonia-Arsuf, a crusader castle in Israel.

Persian pottery shard inscribed with Rubaiyat found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists working in the Old City of Jerusalem have discovered a piece of Persian pottery dating to the 12th-13th centuries. The shard is inscribed with a quotation from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. (photo)

Display of artifacts from Shah Abbas I at British Museum

A new exhibit of Iranian art dating to the 16th and 17th centuries is now open at the British Museum in London. Shah 'Abba's The Remaking of Iran will run through June 2009.

[MID] Qaina

Qaina, A Middle Eastern Dance and Music Event that includes classes, a show, dinner, and a hafla sponsored by the Barony of Brendoken.

[MID] Freezing our Haflas Off

After a year hiatus, the Hafla returns to the Barony of White Waters. Once again you can study the arts of dancing and drumming as well as other Mid Eastern arts. The Crusader Camp will once again be available for fighters to sit and discuss the Arts Martial, possible outdoor classes weather permitting.

Bookworms damage books in Knights of Malta archives

Bookworms and crude repairs have wrought destruction on the priceless parchment books in the archives of the Malta Study Center at the Hill Museum and Manuscript Library. American Public Radio's Speaking of Faith has the 14-minute, online story.

Chemical warfare in Roman times

It was a very bad day for 3rd century Roman soldiers who tried to defend a fortress by way of a cramped tunnel. Dead soldiers were doused with toxic substances and set on fire, causing the Romans to retreat.

Re-created Israeli village teaches history to children

In the village of Kfar halfway between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, children learn about Israel of 2,000 years ago and the Hanukkah story with the help of historic re-enactors. The village also features activities for kids such as harvesting olives and making oil.

Byzantine bathhouse found in Israel

Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority report that a 5th century Byzantine bathhouse has been discovered in Zikhron Ya‘aqov, Israel. The "magnificent" structure is well-preserved and believed to have belonged to a private residence. (photo)

Islamic grafitti may help solve Qur'an mystery

A 7th century inscription in stone by an Arabic traveler may help solve a mystery about the Qur'an pondered by scholars for centuries: Why was the text seemingly written without diacritical marks?

6th century Sleeping Buddha escaped "wrath of the Taliban"

A 1500-year-old "Sleeping Buddha" statue has been found buried in Afghanistan near the site of the tragic destruction of two other statues seven years ago by Taliban extremists. The latest 62-foot long Buddha was found by a French-Afghan team.

Byzantine floor may have graced church in Jerusalem

The discovery of a simple mosaic floor beneath Temple Mount's Aksa Mosque has led archaeologists to speculate that the Mosque may have superceded a Byzantine church, but other experts disagree.

5th century church discovered in Syria

Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be the largest ancient church ever discovered in Syria. The remains of the 5th century structure were found recently near Palmyra in central Syria.

Road to Alexandria photos online

Llywelyn has posted an album of photos from the recent Road to Alexandria event in the Marche of Gwyntarian (Middle Kingdom) on his Flickr website.