Medicine

History of medicine; healing; herbalism

Medieval Science Page

The Medieval Science Page is a comprehensive directory of cataloged links to resources about general science in the Middle Ages. Topics include alchemy, navigation, mathematics, medicine, botany, timekeeping (horology), weights and measures (metrology), physics, and many others.

The lepers are coming

Leprosy was eradicated from Britain in the 17th century, but "lepers" (aided by costume and makeup) will return in a torchlight procession through the town of Torrington.

Science Daily: Did Shakespeare have Syphilis?

A new study of the writings of William Shakespeare leads researchers to believe the bard may have had syphilis.

Medieval villagers 'passed human TB on to their cattle'

Tuberculosis may have passed from humans to animals, and not the other way around, according to new DNA research conducted on bones from an abandoned medieval village in the Yorkshire Wolds.

Lefties have the Upper Hand in Fights

Right-handed fighters beware. According to a new study by the University of Montpellier, left-handers are "better in fights."

Knit for Charity

Several SCA kingdoms are participating in a project to knit or crochet bandages for people suffering from leprosy.

Luther's "Loo" Excites Archaeological Community

Archaeologists in Germany believe they have found Martin Luther's toilet in a newly-unearthed annex of his Wittenberg home.

Catching the Bug: Aoife Gets the Flu

This week, Dame Aoife discusses medieval illnesses, especially the flu.

Midrealm Champions Accept Challenge Against Breast Cancer

Sgt. Rutgur of the Middle Kingdom, along with the other baronial champions, has accepted a challenge by His Majesty Brannos to raise money for breast cancer research.

Medieval dentistry was better than many believe

A paper by osteoarchaeologist Trevor Anderson, published in the British Dental Journal, discusses medieval dental hygiene and health, and says the practices of the time were more advanced than is popularly believed.

Medici Mummies to Tell Tales?

On Sunday October 17, 2004, at 9:00 pm (EDT) TLC will present Mummy Detective: The Crypt of the Medici, a program examining the remains of 50 members of the Medici family to see how they lived — and how they died.

Anglo-Saxon Brain Surgery Re-writes History Books

Medical history may need to be re-written after the recent discovery of a skull which shows signs of complex surgery.

Mystery of Royal Mistress' Death

Historians are using DNA and modern forensic technology to investigate the death of Anges Sorel, mistress to Charles VII of France.

Bloodletting may have had benefits

A new study finds that the ancient practice of bloodletting might actually have been beneficial to some patients.

Reading Causes Backstrain!

Tony Gabriele of the Daily Press offers a warning to parents: Don't teach your children to read!

Science Daily: Medieval People Nearly as Tall as Modern

A new study by the Ohio State University states that Northern European men of the early Middle Ages were nearly as tall as modern-day Americans.

Did Vikings Need Viagra? (PG-13)

A new study shows that Viking men had the same performance concerns as their modern brothers.

On Rehydration

Friar Galen of Ockham, former Chirurgeon General of the SCA (and a modern-world medical doctor) has kindly allowed SCAtoday.net to share with you an article he has recently written about hydration for reenactment events.

Medieval Science, Math and Medicine

This week's collection of annotated links from Aoife deals with Medieval Science, Math and Medicine.