Medicine

History of medicine; healing; herbalism

Spain Claims Remains of Columbus

The mystery continues. After years of testing, Spanish researchers are claming that their country possesses the bones of explorer Christopher Columbus.

Romani DNA Found in 11th Century Anglo-Saxon Skeleton

The 11th Century skeleton of a young Anglo-Saxon Christian male has found to contain a rare form of mitochondrial DNA identified as Romani.

Period Spectacles

Retired ophthalmologist David Fleishman has created a website dealing with the history of spectacles: "Eyeglasses Through the Ages."

Woman Is Treated for the Plague

The Los Angeles Times reports that an area woman is being treated for bubonic plague, which she may have caught from fleas around her neighborhood.

German "Swamp Girl's" Skeleton Tells Tale

A skeleton found in a German swamp proved to belong to a 15-year-old girl who lived 650 years ago.

Identity of Jamestown Skeleton Still Unknown

Extensive DNA testing has yet to reveal the identity of a skeleton found in the Jamestown, Virginia excavations. Researchers now doubt that the remains belong to Captain Bartholomew Gosnold.

Ring around the Rosie: A Dissenting View

Magistra Nicolaa de Bracton, who has researched the nursery rhyme's controversial origins for Tournaments Illuminated, offers a rebuttal of a web article linked from SCAtoday.net recently.

Head of Copernicus Found?

Archaeologists excavating a crypt beneath a 14th century cathedral in Frombork, Poland, believe they may have found the skull of the revolutionary astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus.

Smell of the Middle Ages

On its website, Trivium Publishing offers suggestions for enjoying the medieval experience by using your sense of smell through an article entitled Smell of the Middle Ages by Jacquelyn Hodson.

Black Plague Caused Climate Change

A new study suggests that the devastating Black Death may have done more than wipe out 1/3 of the population. It may have triggered Europe's "Little Ice Age" in the 14th century.

Cooper's Crack Good for Fighters!

In an article on the March 15, 2006 edition of NPR's Morning Edition, it was reported that researchers have found that chocolate milk is better for athletes than Gatorade™.

Medieval Medical Myth-Busting

In a lengthy article for Strange Horizons written in 2003, Michael Livingston attempts to debunk many myths about medieval medicine.

Murder in France: a Very Cold Case

Cold Case Files could really cover a recent discovery in Plouezoc'h, France, where police spent several years trying to solve the murder of a woman found slain with a hatchet. Turns out, she died in the 15th century.

An Tir to host Known World Chirurgeon Symposium

Lady Sophia, Known World Chirurgeon Symposium Coordinator, has announced that this event will be held May 6 and 7 as part of the 40 Year Celebration event.

Murder in Sweden

700 years after it happened, the cause of death of Sweden's oldest human skeleten has been determined: he was murdered!

As We Sow: Medieval Gardens

Dame Aoife has been a busy lady with holidays and her modern-world job, but this week she's back with a pre-springtime Links edition devoted to medieval gardens.

Edinburgh's Short-hole Golf Course Site of Plague Burial

Edinburgh's revered Bruntsfield Links, a short-hole golf course, may actually be the grave site of vicitims of the city's Black Plague from the 15th and 17th centuries.

Mystery of 'Unicorn' Whale Solved

The narwhal, known in folklore as the "unicorn whale" for its spiraling tusk, has been a mystery to scientists and traditional Inuit cultures alike, for no one could explain the purpose of the tusk. Now a researcher from Harvard says he has the answer.

Viking in Your Genes? Volunteers Donate DNA for Test

Predisposed towards battle axes, but never understood why? The answer may be in your genes.

Roman Remedies

During this fly season, James Le Fanu of the Telegraph takes a look at Roman medicinal remedies, including some from the Materia Medica by Pedanius Dioscorides.

7th Century Skeletons Discovered in Malmesbury

While digging the foundations for an expansion of the Old Bell Hotel in Malmesbury, England, workers discovered two skeletons believed to date back to 675 A.D.

DNA Test of Jamestown Skeleton Inconclusive

DNA tests conducted on a 400-year-old Jamestown, VA skeleton have failed to prove that the remains are those of Jamestown founder Bartholomew Gosnold.

Southwest Hispanics Find Link to Sephardic Jews

New DNA evidence has produced some surprising links between Hispanics living the America's Southwest and Sephardic Jews who fled the Inquisition 400 years ago.

Medieval Monks May have Held Secrets of Diet Pill

An herbal remedy used by 12th century Scottish monks may be resurrected as a modern appetite suppressant.

New York lecture series showcases historical medicine

The New York Academy of Medicine hosts a four-part lecture series, beginning September 27, on the subject of medicine in ancient and medieval times.

Medieval Englishmen Same Size as Modern Men

Contrary to popular belief, our medieval ancestors were not smaller than we are. A new study of medieval skeletons shows that the average height of English men and women then is about what it is now.

Viking Estrid Not Mother but Daughter

In an article for New Scientist, researchers disclose that the female remains buried with the last Viking king were not those of his mother as previously believed, but in reality, his daughter-in-law.

DNA Test May Show Romans Visited China

Researcher Xie Xiaodong is trying to prove that ancient Romans made it to Northwest China's Gansu Province by comparing DNA evidence to establish a genetic link.

Bunions are Period!

According to a scholarly study of burials, medieval shoes caused the same kinds of foot problems as modern ones.

Bad Teeth a Medieval Myth?

Professor Wolfgang Arnold, from the University of Witten/Herdecke, believes that medieval peasants may have had better teeth than modern men because they chewed their food and ate raw vegetables.