Medicine

History of medicine; healing; herbalism

Today in the Middle Ages: December 21, 1494

The city of Naples reported an outbreak of a new disease on December 21, 1494 C.E. Its modern name: syphilis.

Estrella War to hold Roses Cancer Tourney

Countessa Mariana Vivia de Santiago of the Kingdom of Atenveldt has announced that she will host a Roses Cancer Tournament at Estrella War XXIII. The event will benefit the American Cancer Society.

A Vaccine for the Black Death

A Norwegian scientist claims to have solved the mystery behind the Black Death and to have created a vaccine against it.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 1, 1478

On October 1, 1478, plague returned to the city of Florence.

Medieval Medical Images Library

The University of California at Los Angeles has published an Index of Medieval Medical Images which includes period depictions of medical procedures up until the year 1500.

CSI Needed for Roman Crime?

An archaeological team working near Sedgeford,England may need the help of criminal investigators to solve a 1500-year-old mystery: was the skeleton found pushed into the oven of a Roman farm murdered?

Gout may have Forced Abducation of Charles V

Medical researchers working with the 500-year-old pinky of Emperor Charles V of Spain report that the mummified finger shows signs of debilitating gout which would have caused great pain. Charles V abdicated in favor of his brother at the age of 56.

World's Oldest Condom Found

Archaeologists have discovered the world's oldest surviving condom in Lund, Sweden. The artifact dates to 1640 and is made of pig's intestine.

Woad may have modern use in cancer-busting drugs

The medieval Scottish rebels made famous in the movie Braveheart used dye from the woad plant to paint their faces blue for battle. Now Italian biochemists say this plant could become a promising weapon in the fight against cancer.

Medieval Heavy Metal Pollution Still An Issue

Scientists have tracked down the source of heavy metal pollution on a site in Northern France to the remains of medieval metallurgical workshops.

Spain Claims Remains of Columbus

The mystery continues. After years of testing, Spanish researchers are claming that their country possesses the bones of explorer Christopher Columbus.

Romani DNA Found in 11th Century Anglo-Saxon Skeleton

The 11th Century skeleton of a young Anglo-Saxon Christian male has found to contain a rare form of mitochondrial DNA identified as Romani.

Period Spectacles

Retired ophthalmologist David Fleishman has created a website dealing with the history of spectacles: "Eyeglasses Through the Ages."

Woman Is Treated for the Plague

The Los Angeles Times reports that an area woman is being treated for bubonic plague, which she may have caught from fleas around her neighborhood.

German "Swamp Girl's" Skeleton Tells Tale

A skeleton found in a German swamp proved to belong to a 15-year-old girl who lived 650 years ago.

Identity of Jamestown Skeleton Still Unknown

Extensive DNA testing has yet to reveal the identity of a skeleton found in the Jamestown, Virginia excavations. Researchers now doubt that the remains belong to Captain Bartholomew Gosnold.

Ring around the Rosie: A Dissenting View

Magistra Nicolaa de Bracton, who has researched the nursery rhyme's controversial origins for Tournaments Illuminated, offers a rebuttal of a web article linked from SCAtoday.net recently.

Head of Copernicus Found?

Archaeologists excavating a crypt beneath a 14th century cathedral in Frombork, Poland, believe they may have found the skull of the revolutionary astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus.

Smell of the Middle Ages

On its website, Trivium Publishing offers suggestions for enjoying the medieval experience by using your sense of smell through an article entitled Smell of the Middle Ages by Jacquelyn Hodson.

Black Plague Caused Climate Change

A new study suggests that the devastating Black Death may have done more than wipe out 1/3 of the population. It may have triggered Europe's "Little Ice Age" in the 14th century.

Cooper's Crack Good for Fighters!

In an article on the March 15, 2006 edition of NPR's Morning Edition, it was reported that researchers have found that chocolate milk is better for athletes than Gatorade™.

Medieval Medical Myth-Busting

In a lengthy article for Strange Horizons written in 2003, Michael Livingston attempts to debunk many myths about medieval medicine.

Murder in France: a Very Cold Case

Cold Case Files could really cover a recent discovery in Plouezoc'h, France, where police spent several years trying to solve the murder of a woman found slain with a hatchet. Turns out, she died in the 15th century.

An Tir to host Known World Chirurgeon Symposium

Lady Sophia, Known World Chirurgeon Symposium Coordinator, has announced that this event will be held May 6 and 7 as part of the 40 Year Celebration event.

Murder in Sweden

700 years after it happened, the cause of death of Sweden's oldest human skeleten has been determined: he was murdered!

As We Sow: Medieval Gardens

Dame Aoife has been a busy lady with holidays and her modern-world job, but this week she's back with a pre-springtime Links edition devoted to medieval gardens.

Edinburgh's Short-hole Golf Course Site of Plague Burial

Edinburgh's revered Bruntsfield Links, a short-hole golf course, may actually be the grave site of vicitims of the city's Black Plague from the 15th and 17th centuries.

Mystery of 'Unicorn' Whale Solved

The narwhal, known in folklore as the "unicorn whale" for its spiraling tusk, has been a mystery to scientists and traditional Inuit cultures alike, for no one could explain the purpose of the tusk. Now a researcher from Harvard says he has the answer.

Viking in Your Genes? Volunteers Donate DNA for Test

Predisposed towards battle axes, but never understood why? The answer may be in your genes.

Roman Remedies

During this fly season, James Le Fanu of the Telegraph takes a look at Roman medicinal remedies, including some from the Materia Medica by Pedanius Dioscorides.