Telegraph

Leaning Tower of Pisa extends warranty for another 300 years

Engineers studying Pisa's famous Leaning Tower feel that the structure has been saved for another 300 years thanks to a UK£20 million restoration project.

Nero's gate discovered in Cologne

Constructions workers at the site of Cologne, Germany's new metro line have discovered a Roman gate believed to have been built by the Emperor Nero and dating from the 1st century C.E.

Will Lindisfarne Gospels return north?

The flack over the return of cultural treasures to their native lands has started again, this time over the Lindisfarne Gospels, the priceless 8th century manuscripts currently residing in the British library in London.

Remains of Sir Hugh Despenser the Younger identified at Hulton Abbey

Archaeologists believe that they have identified mutilated remains found at Hulton Abbey as those of Sir Hugh Despenser the Younger, reputed to have been the lover of Edward II. The remains were first discovered in the 1970s.

Shroud of Turin to be retested

Professor Christopher Ramsey, the director of the Oxford University Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, is hoping to run new tests on the Shroud of Turin. He believes that tests run in 1988 to date the relic may have been contaminated.

Domesday Book online

For the first time, those wishing to do research on medieval England online will have access to one of the best resources, William the Conqueror's Domesday Book.

"Domus del Chirurgo" sheds light on Roman medicine

For the past 17 years, archaeologists have worked at the site of the Domus del Chirurgo, the House of the Surgeon, the home of a 2nd century Roman doctor in Rimini, Italy. Among the discoveries: "the largest find of surgical instruments anywhere."

Roman feast gear found in London well

A 4th century banqueting set which once belonged to a rich Roman family was discovered recently in a well during excavation in London. The set included 19 metal vessels. (photos)

Mary Rose besieged by bacteria

The Mary Rose, flagship to King Henry VIII, is facing a much more devious enemy than French warships: bacteria which produce a corrosive acid.

British historians hope to crack down on "nighthawking"

English Heritage and the British Museum are pushing for legislation to curtail the illegal use of metal detectors to discover and remove artifacts from private sites.

Russians can't get enough English history

According to author Adrian Blomfield, "Anglo-Russian relations may be in worse shape than at any time since the Cold War, but that has failed to dent the enthusiasm of thousands of young Russians who spend their weekends recreating British historical battles."

Mona Lisa revealed?

The discovery of some archival documents may have solved the mystery of the identity of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa. The woman may have had humble origins and lived a few hundred feet from the Ponte Vecchio.

You are there: Eyewitness at Sutton Hoo

In an article published by The Telegraph, John Preston relates the story of how his archaeologist aunt unearthed the Anglo Saxon gold at Sutton Hoo in the 1930s.

Study claims "dead languages" detrimental to modern language learning

A recent "secret report" by the Dearing Languages Review in Great Britain warns that the study of ancient languages may be detrimental to the study of modern languages because they "contribute nothing to 'intercultural understanding'."

View of ancient Britons changed by discovery of Roman coin

The discovery of a 2nd century BCE coin in Cornwall may change how pre-Roman Britons are viewed. The pre-Roman Republic silver coin proves that active trading took place with the inhabitants of Britain before Rome conquered the island.

Byzantine Exhibit Includes Classical Themes

An exhibition of Byzantine artifacts shows how the classical style of the Greeks and Romans carried over into the Middle Ages. The Road to Byzantium: Luxury Arts of Antiquity, an exhibit which runs through September 3, 2006 at London's Sometset House, shows a wide range of pieces decorated with classical themes.

Ownership Dispute Stops Auction of Mosque Beams

Christie's withdrew from auction five wooden beams from Cordoba's Great Mosque after questions arose about who rightfully owned them.

Key to ancestry: The true father of Ireland

One in 12 Irishmen are descended from Niall of the Nine Hostages, a fifth century warlord, according to research by geneticists at Trinity College Dublin.

First Nativity Scene to be Restored

A 13th century marble nativity scene by sculptor Arnolfo di Cambio in the oratory of the Basilica of Santa Maria Maggiore in Rome is scheduled to be removed from the church for restoration.

In-Fighting Threatens Church of the Nativity

Squabbling over repairs to the basilica commemorating the birthplace of Jesus may endanger the Church of the Nativity, according to Telegraph reporter Tim Butcher. He writes that the three Christian communities in charge of maintaining the church cannot agree on restoration methods.

Ancient Byways to be Opened to Trekkers

British officals have sparked controversary with a decision to open every track and defunct highway for walkers and 4x4 vehicles.

Noisy Toys Nothing New

The Scottish Urban Archaeological Trust has evidence that noisy toys may date back to the Bronze Age.

Romans Pioneered Luxury Housing and Shopping Malls

New research in England's Roman city of Bath leads archaeologists to believe that wealthy citizens built homes in luxury clusters and shopped in commercial districts.

Medieval villagers 'passed human TB on to their cattle'

Tuberculosis may have passed from humans to animals, and not the other way around, according to new DNA research conducted on bones from an abandoned medieval village in the Yorkshire Wolds.

Kazinform: 13th-14th Century Village Discovered in Kazakhstan

Researchers are excited by the discovery of a 13th-14th century town on the dry bottom of the Aral Sea in Kazakhstan.

Badgers Damage Salisbury Burial Mounds

Badgers? We Don't Need No Stinking Badgers! OK, I couldn't resist! But badgers are reportedly doing serious damage to prehistoric burial mounds on Salisbury Plain.

Oxford Dictionary of National Biography to be Published

Here's a riddle: What has 62.5 million words, over 60,000 pages and includes biographies of people who never existed? It's the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography.

Renaissance Roundel Auctioned for £7 million

A rare bronze roundel discovered under a stairway in Devon, England, has brought nearly UK£7 million in a recent auction, a record for a Renaissance piece.

Eat like it's the 12th century!

Michelin-starred chef Martin Blunos believes that modern diets should follow medieval culinary practices — including understanding the theories behind the four humours.

Border Folks May Claim African Roots

Archaeologists working on Hadrian's wall have found evidence that 500 Moors may have manned the wall in the 3rd century.