Telegraph

Robin Hood's grave up for sale

Long to own a real piece of English history? The Kirklees Estate, near Halifax, West Yorkshire, purported burial place of Robin Hood, is for sale for something over UK£7 million. The site includes several farmhouses, 750 acres of farmland and woods, and a medieval Cistercian priory.

Hard tack and salt beef and beer, oh my!

Scientists from Oxford University have determined the diet of sailors aboard the Mary Rose, based on the study of 80 skeletons from the Royal Naval Hospital, as well as the shipwreck. Their report has been published in the American Journal of Phsyical Anthropology.

Controversial restoration of da Vinci's last painting completed

Over the past 18 months, the art world has held its collective breath to see the results of the Louvre's restoration of Leonardo da Vinci's last work The Virgin and Child with Saint Anne, but the wait is now over. (photo)

Exquisite 17th-Century Farmer's Library

Townend, home to the Brownes from the 1520s until 1943, maintains an exquisite collection of more than 170 books from the 1600s, with a few dating to the mid-1500s. What were those farmers reading?

Henry VIII Decapitated...in Painting

Why was Henry VIII’s face replaced in the painting “Field of the Cloth of Gold”?  The facial image of him on horseback is not the original, and theories abound as to why he was “decapitated”.

Roman brothel coin first of its kind found in Britain

London pastry chef Regis Cursan must have been surprised by his discovery of an ancient coin near Putney Bridge in West London, especially since the coin "depicts a man and a woman engaged in an intimate act." (photos)

Royal Shakespeare Company to create "portable" theater for London performances

Stratford's Royal Shakespeare Company is hoping to construct a "flatpack replica" of famous theater for use in large productions in London. The theater interior would be reconstructed inside an existing building.

Vatican publication claims Shakespeare was Catholic

The new film Anonymous, which debates the authorship of Shakespeare's plays, has opened a new controversary: the playwright's religion. L'Osservatore Romano reports that references in several plays prove that the Bard was Roman Catholic.

Fibonacci: How numbers helped shape the development of modern Western Europe

In 1202, life in western Europe was changed by the publication of Liber abbaci, a book by Leonardo of Pisa, known as Fibonacci, the first general-purpose book of arithmetic in the West, which "explained the 'new' methods in terms understandable to ordinary people."

Vindolanda: What I did on my summer vacation

Writer Chris Rowe, winner of a recent Just Back article-writing contest for the travel page of the Telegraph, chronicles a summer-school visit to Vindolanda, the famous Roman fort near Hadrian's Wall in the north of England.

Royal manuscript collection "debunks myth of the Dark Ages"

The world's largest collection of beautifully-illuminated British royal manuscripts from the 9th through 16th centuries will be on display this winter at the British Museum.

British defendent demands trial by combat over UK£25 fine

Leon Humphreys, of Bury St Edmunds, England, failed to notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) that his Suzuki motorcycle was off the road, incurring a UK£25 fine, but instead of payment, Humphreys demanded the ancient right to trial by combat.

Phalluses scrubbed from medieval fresco

After a three-year restoration project, the 13th century Tree of Fertility fresco in the small Italian town of Massa Marittima was ready to view, but art experts had some problems with the restoration work when they noticed that testicles and phalluses hanging from the tree had been removed.

Beer through time in England

The editors of the Telegraph pay homage to everyone's favorite brew with a slideshow of photos entitled An illustrated history of English beer.

Arthur's roundtable at King's Knot, Scotland?

Archaeologists at King's Knot in Stirling, Scotland have discovered a "circular feature" that some believe might be the fabled round table of King Arthur.

"Sophisticated" Roman village found at Northamptonshire construction site

Excavations of a construction site in Burton Latimer, in Northamptonshire, England, have unearthed nearly 40kg of Roman pottery, ironwork, and the remains of 30 Romans, leading experts to believe that the site was once a wealthy Roman village.

Newly-discovered da Vinci could break world auction record

When Salvator Mundi or Saviour of the World, goes to auction, it could sell for a world record UK£125 million. The recently-restored painting, once attributed to Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio, a protégé of Leonardo, has been certified an authentic da Vinci by a panel of experts. (photo)

Fresco of St. Paul found in Naples catacombs

A 6th century fresco of St. Paul has been discovered in the Catacombs of San Gennaro in Naples during restoration work according to L'Osservatore, the official Vatican newspaper. (photo)

The "layered narratives" of London and its buildings

Leo Hollis sees the city of London as a “series of layered narratives that need to be explored.” This is what he does in his book The Stones of London: A History in Twelve Buildings. Philip Womack of The Telegraph has a review.

Scotland's King’s Knot to reveal its secrets

In the 14th century, poet John Barbour placed the site of King Arthur's "tabilll round" south of Stirling Castle in Scotland, a site believed to be King's Knot, a unique “cup and saucer” shaped mound. A new survey may reveal its mysterious secrets.

Final flight of the Endeavour to carry Mary Rose artifact

John Lippiett, chief executive of the Mary Rose Trust, is sending a piece of history into space: "a parrel, a three-inch wooden ball used as part of the mechanism to hoist the sails of Henry VIII's flagship." The artifact will be launched into orbit with the space shuttle Endeavour. (photos)

New film set to spark interest in Hadrian's Wall

The mystery of Rome's "lost legion" has mystified historians for centuries. Now a new young-adult film, along with a redesigned Roman museum, may revive interest in Hadrian's Wall.

Equestrian statues come to life in Rome

Michelanglo's statue of Marcus Aurelius, sculpted in the 1530s, features a horse with "a strong build, a broad chest, thick manes and tails, and robust legs," the same characteristics of modern Maremmano horses, believed to have descended from the emperors' mounts.

Knights Templar in London subject of new book

The 13th century Temple in London, the headquarters of the Knights Templar in the city, is a round church, but it has also served as a bank and document storage facility. Christopher Howse of the Telegraph looks at a new book on the Templars, The Temple Church in London.

Mona Lisa now buried in garbage dump

Thirty years ago, the city of Florence, Italy converted the Sant'Orsola convent, the final resting place of Lisa Gherardini, the model of da Vinci's Mona Lisa, into barracks for the city's Guardia di Finanza. The graves and tombs from the site were dumped into 'Case le Passarini', the rubbish tip near Florence.

English archaeological event involves entire village

Kibworth, England might never be the same, thanks to BBC Four which filmed the series Story of England, presented by the historian Michael Wood, based on a massive archaeological dig involving over 200 residents of the village.

Shakespeare: clues from the rubbish tip

Archaeologists believe they have identified Shakespeare's cesspit on the property of New Place, his home in Stratford-upon-Avon. They now hope to find clues to the playwright's life among the rubbish from a dig.

Do you know a smile when you see one?

Early European explorers in the Caribbean islands commented on the "abominable" and "frightening" figures in the locals' art, with their bared teeth and "burning" eyes. But a new analysis suggests that the artists may have intended these expressions as inviting smiles rather than demonic grimaces.

17th century scientist predicted modern inventions

In the 1660s, Robert Boyle, chemist and Royal Society founding fellow, wrote a list of 24 future predictions about science and technology. All but a few have come true, many in the past fifty years.

Face of a 14th century knight revealed

State-of-the-art technology has been used to reconstruct the face of a medieval knight whose skeleton was discovered beneath Stirling Castle in Scotland. (photo)