Telegraph

Medieval treasures among books of auctioned library

Heywood Bright, liberal British politician, was a collector of rare books. Recently his library, including several previously unknown or incomplete medieval treasures, was auctioned by Christie's.

Rome's Colosseum in the Middle Ages

Once a scene of battle and carnage, Rome's Colosseum later became "a bustling medieval bazaar full of houses, stables and workshops." Evidence of the re-purposed site was collected recently during an archaeological dig.

Richard III descendant to craft king's coffin

In 2013, when experts believed they had discovered the remains of King Richard III, they turned to Michael Ibsen, a 17th generation relation of the monarch for DNA testing. Now Ibsen has been tapped for service again - as the builder of the royal coffin.

Mystery of Wolsey's missing angels solved

Once upon a time, four bronze angels adorned the gateposts of the Wellingborough Golf Club in Northamptonshire, England. No one paid much attention to them until two were stolen, but now all four, identified as Renaissance treasures, are the subject of a fundraising effort by the Victoria and Albert Museum. (photo)

Lionheart: "A bad son, a bad husband, a selfish ruler, and a vicious man?"

Richard the Lionheart is a beloved figure in English history, but the name has sparked controversy with many historians who found the king to be not so virtuous. On his history blog for The Telegraph, Dr Dominic Selwood tries to debunk some of the myths surrounding King Richard I.

Dark ages less barbaric than Roman, says historian

Dominic Selwood is a lawyer, writer and historian. He is also a blogger on a mission: to take the "dark" out of the Dark Ages. Selwood recently blogged on the subject for The Telegraph with Why the so-called 'Dark Ages' were just as civilised as the savage Roman Empire.

Templar interest increases with approaching 700th anniversary

With material such as The Da Vinci Code to capture the public's attention, the myths of the Knights Templar are more popular than ever. Lawyer, noveliest and historian Dr Dominic Selwood has a feature article for The Telegraph.

Symposium scheduled to pinpoint location of Battle of Brunanburh

In 937, a deciding battle was fought which changed the course of British history forever. The Battle of Brunanburh, one of the UK's bloodiest, was fought between the Scots and the Saxons, establishing England's identity. Unfortunately, no one knows where the battle took place.

"Grubby, old pot" contains rare coin

For eight years, a grubby, old pot sat in a basement in Rothbury, England. It was not until recently that builder Richard Mason, who found the pot on Lindisfarne, took a second look, discovering a hoard of gold and silver dating to the 16th century.

Archaeology fan? Wales has an app for that

Wales has introduced the Archwilio app, which will allow smartphone and tablet users to "access information about archaeological sites on maps covering the whole country." The free app will also let users connect and post their own updates.

Touring Roman Britain

Jolyon Attwooll has compiled a list of the "must-see" sites of Roman Britain for a recent article in the Telegraph. The article includes photos, descriptions and links of some of the best tourist spots in the country.

Pre-fire London virtualization wins game company award

Travelers to London are sometimes disappointed to find little of the city's medieval past on tourist maps, thanks to the 17th century fire which destroyed much of the city. Now a team of students offers the next best thing with a virtual "fly-through" of Tudor London.

Roman eagle: one of the "finest artefacts ever unearthed in Britain"

An “exceptional” sculpture of a Roman eagle has been discovered in London. The statue, dating to the 1st or 2nd century, is made of Cotswold limestone and depicts an eagle with a snake in its mouth. (photo, video)

Battlefield discovery inhibits rail construction

Riders of a English railways will have to wait a little longer for the HS2 line thanks to the discovery of a previously "lost" site of a Wars of the Roses battlefield. The site of the Battle of Edgecote between the Earl of Warwick and King Edward IV, fought July 26 1469 in Northamptonshire, lies along the route of the high-speed rail link.

Cheapside Hoard scores dedicated exhibition at the Museum of London

In 1912, a tenement building in Cheapside, in the heart of London, was demolished, unearthing one of the rariest treasures in the city's history. Vivienne Becker, of the Telegraph, offers a feature on the Cheapside Hoard, currently on display at the Museum of London. (photos and video)

Scottish battle anniversaries focus of tourism industry

September 9, 2013 marked the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden (the English won), while 2014 will be the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn (the Scots took that one), two events destined to bring tourists flocking to Scotland and northern England. Sophie Campbell of The Telegraph has a feature story.

William and Kate's housing plans delayed by proposed archaeological dig

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge may have to delay their move into Anmer Hall, the Georgian mansion given to them by the Queen as their new country home, due to two archaeological digs scheduled to take place on the property.

Mary Rose cannonballs early examples of armour-piercing rounds

The Mary Rose, the flagship of Henry VIII found on the ocean floor off the south coast of England, may once again change English history. Scientists studying cannonballs discovered on the ship have found them to be armor-piercing, a technology believed to have been created in the 18th century. (photos)

William Shakespeare, tax-evader

William Shakespeare may have been the world's greatest writer, but he routinely failed to pay his taxes. This is the conclusion of a new study by scholars from Aberystwyth University which shows that Shakespeare was "repeatedly prosecuted and fined for illegally hoarding food, and threatened with jail for failing to pay his taxes."

Secrets revealed at Warwick Castle

Centuries-old Warwick Castle has revealed some new secrets. Time Team presenter Tony Robinson was among the first to see four new rooms  opened to visitors as part of Warwick Castle Unlocked. (video)

Face of "headless king" revealed

Four hundred years after his death, facial reconstructionists have revealed the face of France's 'Good King Henri IV' whose mummifed head is believed to have been discovered in an attic in 2008.

Tudor Armor-Piercing Cannonballs?

Cannonballs recovered from the Mary Rose wreck in England have been shown to contain iron cores, allowing the cannons to punch the shot through enemy vessels.

DNA study shows lasting Roman gift to Britain

Early in the 5th century, the Romans departed from Britain, leaving behind roads, artifacts, walls, and something else. A new DNA study shows that up to 4 million British men carry Italian genetics, and of that, one million probably originate with the Romans.

Arrest Warrant for Niccolo Machiavelli is Unearthed

The 1513 document calls for Machiavelli's arrest, to be proclaimed by the town crier.

Which Catherine? Tudor Portrait Re-identified

Wearing the "wrong clothes" helped experts decide that the portrait wasn't of Henry VIII's last wife but was of his first.

Boar mount possibly linked to Richard III

Experts are investigating the possibility that a copper-alloy boar mount, discovered near the Thames River in London, might have belonged to King Richard III. (photo)

The elite archers of the Mary Rose

Scientists from the University of Swansea have concluded that among those lost with the sinking of the Mary Rose, King Henry VIII's flagship, in 1545, were elite longbowmen. The conclusion was made after the study of over 100 skeletons found on the remains of the ship.

Southwell skeleton identified as "deviant dead"

A 6th-7th century skeleton, discovered in 1959 in the town of Southwell, Notts, England, has been classified as a "deviant burial" by Matthew Beresford, of Southwell Archaeology.

Bye bye, Bythewood

The medieval surnames of England are disappearing. That means no more Bythewoods, Pauncefoots or Foothead, according to Debbie Kennett of the Guild of One-Name Studies, a group dedicated to investigating the origins and heritage of surnames.

Archaeologists ask for police help to uncover Bannockburn story

Stirling Council archaeologist Murray Cook has made an unusual request of the Central Scotland Police headquarters at Randolphfield, Stirling to allow experts to search the police grounds for evidence of the location of the Battle of Bannockburn.