Scotsman

12th Century Farm Discovered Beneath Scottish Hotel

The remnants of a building dating to 1150 and a garden wall have been discovered on the grounds of the Norton House Hotel, near Ingliston, Scotland. Archaeologists feel that the find has "national significance."

Life in Roman Scotland

Judy Vickers of the Scotsman looks at the Roman legacy in Scotland and how they influenced life north of Hadrian's Wall.

Skara Brae: an Ancient Village Revealed

Archeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones, who lives in Orkney, looks at the ancient village of Skara Brae, the neolithic settlement on Scotland's windy northern isles.

Origin of White British Cattle Still a Mystery

A rare and mysterious breed of white British cattle has been traced to the Bronze Age where there were an important part of pre-Roman pagan rituals, but how the cattle came to Britain is still a mystery.

Cowgate Proves to be Extremely Rich Medieval Site

The 2002 fire which devasted part of Edinburgh's Cowgate district opened up a treasure trove for archaeologists with the discovery of hundreds of 15th century artefacts, making the site on a par with medieval sites in London and York.

Who Was the Real William Wallace?

In an article for The Scotsman, Jim Gilchrist looks at the real man behind the Victorian - and Mel Gibson's - version of William Wallace.

Clan Morrison Fortification Revealed

A new archaeological dig on the Isle of Lewis in Scotland's western Hebrides has revealed a fortified settlement located on a sea stack. The fort includes a lookout tower with a defensive wall.

Colloden Nearly a Tossup?

A new study of the Battle of Culloden shows that the Highlanders were closer to winning than previously thought. New excavations of the 1745 battlefield show that Jacobite fighters nearly broke the English lines.

Drumin Castle to Re-Open to the Public

Drumin Castle, the 14th century home of the notorious "Wolf of Badenoch," is set to re-open to the public after extensive restoration. The fortress is located on the Glenlivet Estate in Moray, Scotland.

Archaeologists Set to Dig at Campsite of Edward I

Kirkliston, site of the famous Kirkliston Distillery, was also the location of the camp of Edward I on the eve of the Battle of Falkirk. A new archaeological excavation there may stall plans to build a housing development.

Medieval Scots' Diet Healthier than Modern

New research on medieval cesspits shows that the diet of 15th century Scots was healthier than that of their modern counterparts.

Scottish Botticelli a Fake?

"The Portrait of a Youth," a painting attributed to Botticelli and owned by Scotland's National Galleries, may be a fake.

Loch Lomond Dig is "Archaeologist's Dream"

A recent archaeological dig near Loch Lomond, Scotland, has produced rare artifacts from periods spanning 4,000 years.

Socks With Sandals?

Not just for dorks anymore! New evidence shows that Romans made the wearing of socks with sandals ultra chic!

Medieval Skeletons Discovered on Scottish Farm

Archaeologists are exicted about the recent find of 200 medieval skeletons on a farm near North Berwick, Scotland, and wonder if the graves might be linked to St Baldred, who founded a monastery nearby.

Desperate Viking Housewives?

New evidence reveals that Viking housewives may not have been desperate at all, but may have traveled to new settlements with their husbands.

Scots Fight to Save Culloden from "Space Invaders"

Developers are eyeing the land adjacent to Scotland's Culloden battlefield with dreams of housing projects which would, according to some, "destroy the sense of place."

Mons Graupius Not in Scotland's Grampian

Residents of Scotland's Northeast, known as the Grampian, are up in arms over claims that the famous Roman battle of Mons Graupius did not actually take place in the region.

1,000,000 Scottish Treasures to be Cataloged

In a project sure to make any librarian twitch, the city fathers of Glasgow, Scotland have authorized the cataloging of 1,000,000 of the city's art and archaeological treasures.

15th-century murder solved

Scientists carrying out tests on the exhumed remains of Agnes Sorel, the mistress of King Charles VII of France, have determined that she was poisoned with a lethal dose of mercury.

Farmer's Field Reveals 14th Century Secret

Ten feet beneath a farmer's field near Linlithgow, Scotland lies a secret: a network of 14th century sandstone tunnels.

Headless Romans Stump Experts

Archaeologists working on a Roman cemetery in the Mount area of York are baffled at the discovery of 36 decapitated bodies.

Storms Expose Orkney Burial Site

A team of archaeologists are working to preserve a medieval burial site uncovered recently by winter storms in the Orkneys.

New Book Moves Important Battlefield

In his new book, author James Fraser claims that the battle of Mons Graupius, which allowed Rome dominance over all of Britain, occured not in the north of Scotland, but in the south.

2,000 Year Old Celtic Carving Identified

A stone carving, found 20 years ago in a back garden, has been identified as a 2000 year old Celtic carving from the Iron Age.

Abbey Ruins of Strata Florida in Wales

Experts say the abbey at Strata Florida was once a city of light to rival Westminster Cathedral, and Oxford and was once much bigger than the current ruins of today would suggest.

New Techniques Used to Recreate Roman Imperial Cloth

Researchers working on the Roman city of Pompeii are using ancient methods to re-create the Roman imperial cloth used for togas.

Rosslyn Chapel May be Re-Created Outside of Scotland

The producers of the Da Vinci Code movie may choose to build their own version of Rosslyn Chapel rather than deal with restrictions imposed by the building's trustees.

10th century Viking market found in Cumbria

Archaeologists believe they have discovered a 10th Century Viking market in Cumbria, orginally thought to have been a burial ground.

Home of 8th century Scottish monk found

Archaeologists believe they may have found the home of St Baldred of the Bass, one of the best known monks of 8th century Scotland.