Reuters

Middle Eastern dancing gains popularity among Europeans

Once upon a time, almost all belly dancers were Middle Eastern, but now the art form is catching on in Europe, and some European-born dancers are bringing the dance full-circle by performing in the Middle East.

Gun Control Leads South Africans to Medieval Methods of Protection

Tighter gun control laws in South Africa are causing more and more South Africans to purchase medieval weapons for their own protection.

Gutenberg May Not have Invented the Printing Press

Has Johannes Gutenberg been wrongly credited with the invention of the printing press? An Italian researcher thinks so.

Mapungubwe Ruins to Attract Visitors

South Africa plans to attract visitors to a new national park, the centerpiece of which will be excavations from the Mapungubwe Kingdom.

9th Century Mercian Penny Names King Coenwulf

A man walking his dog on a footpath near Bedfordshire, England idly picked up a coin believed to be worth 120,000-150,000 pounds.

TV viewers select 15th century sites for 'Restoration'

British viewers of the program 'Restoration' have selected the Old Grammar House, built between 1434 and 1460 in Birmingham, and the Saracen's Head, built in 1492 in the nearby village of Kings Norton, to be restored with a grant of over 3 million pounds (over US$5.5 million).

1,000-Year-Old Brewery Unearthed

U.S. researchers have unearthed what they say may be the oldest known brewery in the Andes, a pre-Incan plant at least 1,000 years old that could produce drinks for hundreds of people at one sitting.

Chaucer's scrivener unmasked

A researcher at Cambridge University, while researching the history of medieval scribes in London, has found that the copyist who worked for Geoffrey Chaucer was a man named Adam Pinkhurst, who joined the Scriveners' Company of London in 1392.

Vandal Damages Venetian Statues

A recent wave of vandalism, which Venetian mayor Paolo Costa has blamed on "an isolated lunatic," has resulted in damage to a column of the Doge's Palace at St. Mark's Square

Exhibit on 15th Century Manuscripts at the Getty

''Fit for a King: Courtly Manuscripts, 1380-1450'' will be on display at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California, through August 29.

World's Most Expensive Glass to be Auctioned

A 1700-year-old Middle Eastern bowl known as the Constable-Maxwell Cage-Cup will be auctioned in London next month, and is expected to sell for about 2 million English pounds.

It's Rosewater Season in Iran

The small town of Qamsar in Iran is the center for the rosewater industry in the Middle East, a center that finds itself in a flurry of activity in early summer.

New Book on the Inquisition Published

Germany was where more male and female "witches" were killed by civilian tribunals around the start of the 15th century, according to a new book on the Inquisition -- about 25,000 out of a population of 16 million -- but the book's editor says that fewer people were killed in the Inquisition than is commonly believed.

Scuola Gladiatori Roma Offers Complete Roman Experience

Those who can't get enough of ancient times may want to sign up for the Scuola Gladiatori Roma, where they will learn Latin as well as gladiator skills.

Deforestration Threatens Pandas... and Fighters

Deforestration is threatening not only rare animals, but also bamboo plants, the source of the world's rattan, according to a report by the United Nations Environment Program.

Sketches Found in Museum Stockroom Identified as Michelangelo Originals

A pair of sketches discovered in the stockroom of the Prado gallery in Spain have been officially identified as originals created by Renaissance artist Michelangelo.

Louis XVII to Have Royal Burial, 209 Years Late

DNA analysis positively proves that a heart long believed to be that of Louis XVII is genetically compatible with DNA taken from the tombs of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette.

Oxford Museum Acquires Renaissance Phallic Plate [PG-13]

Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, England has purchased a ceramic plate devised entirely of penises and bearing a bawdy inscription.

Stone Age Settlement Discovered Off the Coast of England

Evidence of a Mesolithic settlement has been found underwater off the coast of Newcastle in northern England.

Scientists Study Medieval Gunpowder

A gunpowder made from mixture of charcoal, saltpeter and sulfur -- like the gunpowder used in the 14th century -- equals the explosive force of the 20th century version, according to a report presented at the British Association for the Advancement of Science.

Romania Rushing to Restore Byzantine Frescoes

Restoration work is underway on damaged 15th and 16th century Byzantine frescoes at the monasteries of Bucovina.

Salford Manor House Named Britain's Oldest Continuously Occupied Home

A manor house in Somerset, thought to date to before 1150, has been named the longest continuously occupied home in Britain.

Italian Archaeologists Work to Uncover Ancient Pozzuoli

For the past decade, a team of archaeologists has been working to reveal the wonders of the city of Pozzuoli, once the port of ancient Rome, now encased by the foundations of a Spanish city built in the 16th century on Naples.

First Century "Roman Cosmetics" Found in London Archaeological Dig

Archaeologists working at the site of a Roman temple in London, dating back to AD 50, have found a sealed tin box containing a white cream, thought to be face cream or face paint.

Two Charged After Human Catapult Death

British police charged two men with manslaughter Tuesday following the death of an Oxford University student who was flung from a giant catapult.

Oldest Fragment of Nibelungen Myth Found in Austria

Fragments of parchment found in the Zwettl monastery in Austria are reported to be the oldest version yet discovered of the epic Nibelungen myth.

British Archaeological Find Refutes Theory on Tuberculosis Origins

A long-standing theory has held that the Romans brought tuberculosis to England, but scientists have found a 2200-year-old skeleton that invalidates that claim.