BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Artifacts found at site of Roman fort in Scotland

A team of archaeologists, supervising the installation of a water main through the site of a Roman fort near Kirkton, Scotland, has discovered a cobbled roads and artifacts dating to Roman times.

Solving the mystery of Roman Wales

Visitors to Caerleon, near Newport in south Wales have long admired the huge 1st century Roman amphitheater, the site of gladiatorial combat, but new discoveries point to the area as an important Roman outpost in Britain. (video)

Heart of St Laurence O'Toole stolen from Dublin cathedral

Police in Dublin, Ireland are puzzled by the theft of the heart of St Laurence O'Toole, a 12th century relic housed at Christ Church Cathedral. The heart, in a wooden box, was stolen March 2, 2012 when the protective metal bars were cut.

Behind-the-scenes look at the treasures of the Mary Rose

Take in inside look at the artifacts recovered from the Tudor ship the Mary Rose with BBC South Today's Sally Taylor and historic weapon expert and actor Robert Hardy in a BBC video clip.

British universities come together to study Vikings

"Experts coming together to pass on their knowledge to students in the beautiful environments of Oxford and Kirkwall - what could be better?" said Dr Donna Heddle, director of the Orkney-based Centre for Nordic Studies about the collaboration of scottish and English universities on Viking studies.

Summer Was Deadly for Tudors

Recent research indicates that summertime produced the most fatal accidents during the 16th century.

Volcanoes key to "Little Ice Age"

A new study, led by Gifford Miller at the University of Colorado at Boulder, US, may show that a series of volcanic eruptions around 1300 may have led to the Little Ice Age, which dropped temperatures in Europe in the 1500s.

"Best preserved medieval timber barn in England" bought by English Heritage

English Heritage has purchased Harmondsworth Barn, the "Cathedral of Middlesex," for UK£20,000. The barn, originally used for storing grain, "resembles the nave of a large church." It was built in 1426. (photo)

Cow shed appears to be oldest Welsh house

Experts working on a project to date Wales' oldest buildings by studying tree rings believe they may have found the country's oldest house. A cow shed in Llanrwst, Conwy has timbers dating to before 1402, the date of the previous oldest house. (photo)

Beheaded skeletons might be victims of royal decree

Dr Britt Baillie, from the University of Cambridge, believes that 54 skeletons discovered in 2009 at Ridgeway Hill in England were Viking mercenaries from the time of Aethelred the Unready. All remains were found beheaded "in an unusual fashion from the front."

Hoard of Roman Coins Found in Bath

Believed to date from 270 CE, more than 30,000 Roman coins were found in 2007 in Bath, England.

11th century penny found in Gloucester, England

Maureen Jones has found a treasure. The metal detector enthusiast discovered a hammered silver coin dating to the time of William the Conqueror while searching a Gloucester field in November 2011. (photo)

William Wallace letter to be display at Scottish Parliament

Historians in Scotland have long hoped to reclaim a letter written by the French king giving safe conduct to William Wallace to speak with Pope Boniface VIII. Now the 700-year-old letter will be loaned to the National Records of Scotland for display at the Scottish Parliament.

Wakehurst yew saw reign of Richard II

An ancient yew tree, dating to the 14th century, has been identified at Wakehurst Place in West Sussex. The tree is believed to have been part of a large landscaped garden, and was planted just after the Black Death.

Wikipedia to cover life in Monmouth

Roger Bamkin, of Wikimedia UK, has invited the public to take part in an experiment: chronicle life in Monmouth. The online encyclopaedia will create Monmouthpedia, a site where citizens and visitors can "contribute articles and photographs on interesting and notable places, people, artefacts and other aspects of Monmouth life."

Grant awarded to search for Viking "court circle" in Sherwood Forest

Several years ago, the Friends of Thynghowe, an amateur history group, was instrumental in discovering a Viking Thing in England's Sherwood Forest. Now the group has received a grant to search a wider area.

Grant awarded to preserve 15th century "deadly sins" paintings

The devil is in St Cadoc's church in Llancarfan, Wales, and officials from the Heritage Lottery Fund have decided to award the church UK£500,000 to keep him there. (photos)

Ogle Castle up for sale for nearly UK£2m

Those with an extra UK£1.79m may wish to purchase Ogle Castle, near Ponteland in Northumberland, England, one of the oldest inhabited buildings in the country. Bo Boanas, owner of the castle, says he doesn't believe the building is haunted, despite its violent past. (photo)

Wall collapse leads to archaeological opportunity at Stirling Castle

It was good news and bad news for officials at Stirling Castle in Scotland. A wall retaining late 15th century garden terraces collapsed, but the collapse now affords the opportunity to investigate remnants of gardens made for James IV.

Roman ring awarded to Welsh museum

The British Museum has given a Roman ring, found on Cefn Brithdir in Wales, to the Winding House Museum at New Tredegar for permanent display. The ring was discovered by a metal detectorist. (photo)

17th Century "fairytale cottage" may have link to dark history

Workers from United Utilities in the village of Barley, England, were "stunned" to discover a well-preserved 17th century cottage during a construction project. The cottage included the bones of a cat found inside a wall, possibly put there to ward off evil spirits.

Chatham's Tudor shipyard confirmed

Archaeologists working on a dig in Chatham, England have confirmed that a dockyard dating to the time oif Henry VIII existed on the site of the Command House pub on the banks of River Medway. Officials hope to make a bid to declare the dockyard a World Heritage site.

Coventry's stained glass featured in BBC slideshow

The Parish Church Cathedral of St Michael in Coventry, England was constructed in the 12th century. In World War II, it was destroyed when the city of Coventry was bombed and burned. Before the destruction, five historic windows were removed and are now the subjest of a BBC slideshow.

British Male Progeniture and Act of Settlement overturned

A vote by the 16 members of the British Commonwealth has allowed a daughter of William and Catherine the possibility to ascend to the British throne. The rule of male primogeniture, giving males precedence over females in British royalty, dating to 1689, was recently overturned.

Pin-pointing Hastings

Battle Abbey and its surrounds, the traditional site of the Battle of Hastings between King Harold and William the Conqueror, may not be the actual site of the battle, according to a new book by Nick Austin, Secrets Of The Norman Invasion.

Restoration of Newcastle's Black Gate planned

In the 13th century, Henry III built the Black Gate at Newcastle, England's castle to help beef up the defenses of the City. Now the City Council has been awarded UK£1.4m by the Heritage Lottery Fund to make the site available to the public.

Bodleian Library digitizes Mishneh Torah

One of the most important manuscripts in the Bodleian Library's Hebrew collection is the 12th century Mishneh Torah, a guide to Jewish law handwritten and signed by Hebrew scholar Maimonides. The manuscript has now been digitized and is available online.

Remains of fifteen Anglo-Saxons given Christian burial

Last year, fifteen skeletons dating to Angelo Saxon times were discovered during a construction project at the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Bicester, England. Recently the remains were re-interred in a church memorial garden. (video)

Scottish archaeologists investigate vitrified fort

1,300 years ago, a tribe of warriors tried in vain to defend a fort below Abbey Craig in Stirling, Scotland. Their failure led to the total destruction, or vitrification, of the fort by fire. Recently archaeologists spent four days investigating the site.

Own an ancient English Monument

For a mere UK£30,000, interested parties can purchase a two acre site in Driffield, England containing Moot Hill, where archaeologists believe an 11th century motte and bailey castle may have stood.