BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

Scots celebrate rediscovery of David's Tower

For centuries, the 100 ft. (30.5 metre) tall David's Tower dominated the skyline of Edinburgh, Scotland until it was destroyed during the Lang Siege of 1573. Long forgotten, the demolished tower was rediscovered in 1912 and feted today, 100 years later. (video)

Scone Palace archway restored

In September 2010, the historic, 16th-century arch leading to the grounds of Scone Palace in Scotland was destroyed when a delivery truck misjudged the size of the arch's opening. Now, after two years, the arch has been restored. (video)

Adopt a spire in Milan

Philantropists around the world have been invited to "adopt" a spire of the 14th century cathedral in Milan, Italy. For the gift of 100,000 euros (UK£80,000), donors will receive the right to have their names inscribed on one of the church's 135 spires.

St. Ursula pilgrim badge donated to Museum of Lancashire

Metal detector enthusiast Paul King was thrilled while trying out new equipment to discover a silver pilgrim badge depicting one of the companions of St. Ursula. Now he will see his find on display at the Museum of Lancashire in Preston. (photo)

Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum to receive grant

The Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum project has received a grant of UK£900,000 to promote community archaeology and to "encourage dialogue about this historic battle and how it has impacted communities from both sides of the Borders."

Remains of Northampton Castle discovered

Three feet (one metre) beneath the surface of the site for the new railway station building in Northampton, England, lay a secret, recently discovered: the remains of the 11th Century, Northampton Castle.

Battle of Hastings cancelled due to rain

Sunday October 14, 2012 marked the 346th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings which brought Norman rule to Anglo-Saxon England. Unfortunately, rain and mud put a damper on the celebration, cancelling the battle re-enactment.

Saxon skeleton reburied

In 2009, the Chequers Inn in Bressingham, England caught fire and burned. During the demolition, the remains of a 7th century Saxon man were discovered buried beneath the pub. Now the man has received a burial in the churchyard of St John the Baptist.

Raising of Mary Rose marked

Tudor archers with longbows marked the 30th anniversary of the raising of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose, from the floor of the Solent. The BBC celebrated the occasion with a short video.

Robin Hood Land?

The city council of Nottingham, England and a private concern are at odds over plans to construct two major attractions honoring Robin Hood in Nottinghamshire. The city hopes to revamp the Nottingham Castle, while Discovery Attractions wants to build a UK£13m theme park near Edwinstowe. (graphic)

Leicester burials continue to mystify

The mysteries surrounding remains found under a Leicester, England car park continue with efforts to identify the bones of a woman found in the vicinity of those suspected to belong to King Richard III. Experts are puzzled at the burial of a woman in Greyfriars church, a male institution.

British MP calls for state funeral for Richard III

Leicester South MP Jon Ashworth believes that a state funeral would be appropriate for the recently-discovered remains, believed to be those of King Richard III. "I think he should have a state funeral because he is the last English monarch to have died on a battlefield," said Ashworth.

Anglo-Saxon Portraits on the BBC

BBC Radio 3 The Essay offers a series of 15-minute portraits of great Anglo-Saxons in an audio podcast. The series features acclaimed historians.

Bayeux Tapestry captured in crystal

The 11th century Bayeux Tapestry, depicting the Battle of Hastings, measures an impressive 70m (230ft). Now an artist from Somerset, England has engraved the entire piece onto a crystal bowl. (photo)

British MP calls for hunt for the remains of Henry I

England's Reading East MP Rob Wilson has been paying attention to the possible discovery of te remains of Richard III, and would like to have the same experience in his district. King Henry I, son of William the Conqueror, founded Reading Abbey in 1121 and is thought to have been buried there in 1135.

Medieval well found beneath 17th century house

In June 2012, the 17th century Cupola House, home of the Strada restaurant, burned, but treasure has come from tragedy. During the restoration of the house, experts discovered a medieval well predating the later house.

London burials surprise archaeologists

The discovery of over 500 skeletons, some dating to the Middle Ages, has halted plans for the construction of a UK£20m leisure centre in south-east London. BBC London's Nick Beake has a video report.

Archaeologists find evidence from "one of the saddest hours in Scottish history"

An archaeology team in Stracathro, Scotland were working on a Roman fort when they discovered something very interesting: The possible ruins of the church where John Balliol abdicated his throne to Edward I in 1296.

Wind farm could save Lochindorb Castle

A 17-turbine wind farm could be the benefactor of a 14th century Scottish castle if a project proposal from Infinergy is successful. Lochindorb Castle, the home of Alexander Stewart, the Wolf of Badenoch, is owned by Cawdor Estates, a partner in the venture. (photo)

No RIP for royal heads

With the discovery of the possible remains of England's King Richard III, thoughts turn to the fates of other kings who found no peace in their rest. Greig Watson of BBC News has the story.

Dwynwen's church to be restored

Santes Dwynwen, daughter of Welsh King Brychan Brycheiniog, who died in the 5th century, is considered the patron saint of Welsh lovers. Now a ruined church at Llanddwyn on Anglesey has been scheduled for restoration.

Oxfordshire Museum displays Anglo Saxon brooch

Until the end of December, 2012, the Oxfordshire Museum is proudly exhibiting a 7th century garnet and gold brooch discovered in a woman's grave in Oxfordshire in 2009. (photo)

York Mystery Plays community project

"At times you feel like you're looking at a huge film set with masses of people on stage, all pulling in the same direction, creating big pictures," says director Paul Burbridge about a new production of the 14th century York Mystery Plays.

Saxon "paupers' cemetery" found under British construction site

The remains of a 9th-10th century church and its graveyard have been discovered during construction along the Ipswich, England waterfront. 300 graves, consisting largely of very old and very young bodies, were found, exceeding the expectations of researchers who knew that a church might exist on the site.

Richard III Society hopes to rewrite English history

Winston Churcill wrote, "History is written by the victors." So believe the members of the Richard III Society who feel that the Tudors - including Shakespeare, who worked for them - maligned the memory of King Richard for their own purposes.

Discovered village offers "a glimpse of rural 13th Century life"

Archaeologists have begun work on a site near Bromyard, England where they believe they will find the remains of a medieval village. "It may be part of a village called Studmarsh, on land known as the Grove."

Development threatens War of the Roses battlefield

The Northampton Borough Council in Northampton, England is eager to turn over the 85-acre Delapre Park to sports club for their use, but there's a glitch. The park may be the site of a decisve battle between the Houses of York and Lancaster in 1460.

Archaeologists explore Vindolanda's water system

In 1930, Prof Eric Birley first recorded the pipework for the water supply at the Roman fort Vindolanda in Northumberland, England. Recently his grandson, Dr Andrew Birley, continued the legacy by identifying the spring-head and piping system for the fort.

Nigg cross-slab removed for restoration

The Nigg cross-slab, an 8th century, intricately-carved Pictish stone from Easter Ross in Scotland, has been taken to Edinburgh for restoration work at a cost of UK£180,000. Upon completion of the restoration, the stone will be returned to display at Nigg Old Church. (photos)