BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Kent church: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet"

A derelict church in Eastwell, Kent, England, may hold the final resting place of Richard Plantagenet, illegitimate son of King Richard III. A grave in St Mary's churchyard is marked with the inscription: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet". Now scientists want to know the truth.

A tour of the Border Abbeys

Planning a trip to Scotland? You may want to visit the four Border Abbeys, Melrose, Jedburgh, Dryburgh and Kelso, founded by King David I of Scotland in the 12th Century. A recent BBC article looks at the history of the religious sites in a troubled area. (photos)

Unidentified Winchester bones could be exhumed for testing

The recent discovery of the remains of Richard III have led experts to wonder if an unmarked grave in Winchester, England might hold the bones of King Alfred the Great.

Hadrian's Wall: Exciting New Aerial Photographs

Aerial photographs are rewriting the history of Hadrian's Wall. Images indicate there were hundreds - even thousands - of Iron Age settlements there long before the Romans. (photos, video)

Adrian IV last English Pope

The Conclave is over and a new Pope chosen, but the English never stood a chance. There has not, in fact, been an English Pope since Adrian IV in 1155.

Remarkable Roman Finds in London

Eight photos from London's "deepest" Roman dig include leather goods, tableware, a horse pendant and amber.

Roman "industrial complex" found in Wales

"We have a remarkably well-preserved Roman road in good condition and the site is throwing up all manner of interesting things including a lot of lead, which suggests it was connected with the lead workings on Halkyn Mountain," said Will Walker, of Earthworks Archaeology about the discovery of a Roman site near Flint, Wales.

History of Reading Abbey on display for first time

A manuscript chronicling the history of Reading Abbey is on display for the first time at the Berkshire Records Office in Reading, England. The manuscript, consisting of parchment folios bound into a book, was created in the 1340s, and was purchased from a private owner for UK£36,000.

Red Comyn's pendant found in Scottish field

“It’s the find of a lifetime. I’ve been searching for historic gems for more than 30 years and found nothing like this.," said John Eldridge from North Berwick, who used a metal detector to find a 14th century harness pendant belonging to Sir John Comyn in a field near Loch Leven Castle in Scotland. (photo)

St Oran's Cross to return to Iona

St Oran's Cross, one of the world's oldest celtic crosses, will be restored and returned to Scotland's island of Iona in time to see the celebration of the 1450th anniversary of the arrival of St Columba. The 8th century cross weighs over a ton and will stand nearly 15 feet tall. (photo)

Cardinal Wolsey next in line for body search?

The body seach continues. This time the target is Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who died in 1530, and was Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII. Wolsey died and was buried at Leicester Abbey. Now city councillor Ross Willmott wants to search for Wolsey's remains.

Finest Roman Cockerel

An enameled bronze Roman cockeral has been restored after being found in a child's grave.

Economic crisis may have caused "hacked up" Roman silver

In 1919, archaeologists discovered a hoard of Roman silver at Traprain Law in East Lothian, Scotland composed of piles of "hacked up" Roman silver. They believed the late Roman period treasure was brought to Scotland as loot, but a new study by Dr Fraser Hunter shows that economics may have been the cause of the destruction of the dinnerware. (photo)

Car crash damages Curson Lodge in Ipswich, England

A minor automobile accident has damaged the entrance and corner post of Curson Lodge, Ipswich's "finest" Tudor house. The building dates to 1480 and was a guesthouse of the Curson House estate owned by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.

Stafford Castle to be restored

The Stafford Borough Council reports that over UK£75,000 will be spent to restore Stafford Castle, a late 11th century Norman castle in Stafford, England.

Catherine Zeta Jones hopes to help find "lost palace" of Welsh princes

Welsh actress Catherine Zeta Jones and her husband Michael Douglas have donated a "substantial" sum of money to help purchase Abergwyngregyn in Gwynedd, the purported site of the "lost palace" of medieval Welsh princes.

Tolkien's tower bought for UK£1

Decades after J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, one of the "two towers" which may have inspired the writer in the second book, has been purchased with plans for restoration. (video)

Historic High Heels for Men

Manly high heels date back centuries, worn by horsemen as well as powerful rulers.

Residents hope to raise UK£3m to save Cornish church

Residents of south east Cornwall are hoping to raise the UK£3m needed to save the priory at St Germans, a 9th century church in dire need of modernization. The fundraising efforts hope to attract such organizations as the Heritage Lottery Fund to their cause.

Additional Staffordshire finds declared treasure

Over 80 additional artifacts found in the area of the Staffordshire Hoard have been declared treasure. The gold and silver items were discovered near the original site when a field was ploughed. (photo)

Power lines to come down at Sutton Hoo

A UK£200,000 grant is set to finance the removal of power lines and poles from the site of the world-famous Anglo-Saxon burial mounds at Sutton Hoo near Woodbridge, England. Over a mile of lines will be replaced with underground cables.

Our Lady of Paris to receive new bells

Notre Dame de Paris, on the River Seine, has seen over 8 centuries of history, from the Crusades to World War II. Now the city will fête the world's best-known church in a year-long celebration that will include recasting of its bells.

Torre Abbey restored ahead of schedule and under budget

A restoration project completed on time is a rare happening. Even rarer is one completed 6 months early and under budget, but that is the case with work on the 12th century Torre Abbey in Torquay, Devon.

Medieval graffiti in Norfolk churches

In the Middle Ages, some church members had what, in modern life, would be considered an odd way to express an idea or offer a prayer: they wrote on the church wall. Now the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey hopes to record pre-Reformation graffiti in area churches.

Hereford Mappa Mundi removed for conservation evaluation

A 700-year-old map of the world, the Hereford Mappa Mundi, has been removed from display in Hereford Cathedral for evaluation of its condition. The 52 in. (132cm) circular map shows a medieval view of the world with Jerusalem at the center and Paradise "surrounded by a wall and a ring of fire, roughly where Japan would be." (photos)

The last Viking battle: "A war just waiting to happen"

In the 13th century, Scotland was divided between the Scots on the mainland and the Vikings of the western islands. The struggle that followed brought an end to Viking rule in the country. A  new BBC Two program looks at The Last Battle of the Vikings.

Eastgate House to become museum

Admirers of Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers (Westgate) and The Mystery of Edwin Drood (The Nun's House) will be gratified to know that Eastgate House in High Street in Rochester, Kent, England, is scheduled to be restored. (photo)

Tamerlane the Disabled

Tartar warlord Tamerlane may have been the greatest conqueror of all, outshining Genghis Khan and Alexander the Great, but few recognize the fact that the great warrior was severely disabled in his youth. The BBC features Tamerlane in an article for Disability History Month.

Experts stumped by Roman earring

The design on a gold earring disc, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast in Keswick, England, has experts stumped. The disc dates to the Roman era and "features a scorpion, phallus, snake and crab." (photo)

Roman-era tartan?

A tiny piece of cloak depicted in a Roman statue may be the "the first-ever depiction of tartan". The plaid appears on a bronze statue of the Emperor Caracalla with a bound Caledonian warrior wearing what appears to be tartan trews. The statue was found in the Moroccan city of Volubilis. (video)