BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Govan stone: Viking treasures in Scotland

The Scottish town of Govan, near Glascow, has long been known for its shipbuilding, but lying in a churchyard are some of its lesser-known masterpieces: a collection of 31 recumbant stones carved with classic Viking patterns. The stones, including five massive "hogbacks," dating from the 9th century. (photos)

Little hook protector of 16th century fashion

What could be worse than dragging your elegant skirts through the muck on the streets? Nothing, apparently, as revealed by the discovery of a 20mm (0.8 inch) long gold hook designed to hold up ladies' skirts when crossing a muddy yard. (photo)

Investigation of Shakespeare's last home to enter phase 2

Archaeologists have been working on the site of New Place, William Shakespeare's last home in Stratford-upon-Avon, since 2009 and have now discovered "as much as they can" about the site, which was demolished in the 18th century. (photos)

Hobbyists score "biggest collection of medieval silver coins ever found using metal detectors in Scotland"

Gus Paterson and Derek McLennan of Ayrshire, Scotland have made their hobby of treasure hunting pay off. They recently discovered over 300 medieval silver coins, the biggest collection of medieval silver coins ever found using metal detectors in Scotland, in a field at Twynholm, near Kirkcudbright. (photos)

Book of Aneirin goes online

The National Library of Wales has announced that it has made the 13th century Book of Aneirin available online. The manuscript, scribed by monks onto animal skin, is regarded as one of the most important books in the Welsh language.

Structural survey of Barnard's Castle "challenging"

Four years ago, the walls of 12th century Barnard Castle's came tumbling down, but no one has accepted the responsibility for their collapse. Now, with the help of a UK£50,000 grant, a structural survey of the Durham, England site has been scheduled.

Lewis-Gibson Genizah Collection: "a unique and vibrant window into a lost age"

In 1896, twin sisters Agnes Smith Lewis and Margaret Dunlop Gibson brought a collection of Hebrew and Arabic manuscripts from Egypt and deposited them at the United Reform Church's Westminster College in England. Recently Oxford and Cambridge Universities teamed to buy the collection at auction for UK£1.2m.

Geneva Breeches Bible stolen from Welsh church

Thieves of a rare 16th century bible must have had a guilty conscience when they left a modern replacement bible in a locked case in St Mary's church in Trefriw, Wales. The Geneva Breeches Bible was produced by Protestants in Switzerland in 1589.

"Stunning" St George and the Dragon painting found in Welsh church

Beneath 20 layers of paint and lime, conservators have recently uncovered "stunning" 15th century wall paintings in the small, 13th century church of St Cadoc's in Llancarfan, Vale of Glamorgan, Wales. (video)

King Harold and the roundabout

Traditionally it is believed that King Harald was killed on the spot where Battle Abbey now stands, but new evidence, promoted by Channel 4's Time Team, place his death in the Battle of Hastings at a mini roundabout on the A2100.

Celtic coins to remain in Jersey thanks to UK£738,000 government grant

In 2012, Reg Mead and Richard Miles discovered a hoard of 70,000 Celtic coins in a field on the island of Jersey. Now a grant of UK£738,000 will allow the UK£10m treasure to remain on the island.

Mass medieval burial found near Durham Cathedral

Archaeologists are endeavoring to puzzle out the significance of a mass grave discovered during renovation of Durham University's Palace Green library. Instead of defined burials, the remains of 18 individuals seem to have been "tipped" into the grave.

Tudor Monastery Farm on BBC 2

Watchers of BBC 2 may want to catch up on the latest episodes of The Tudor Monastery Farm, where modern experts "work as ordinary farmers under the eye of a monastic landlord, learning to master the landscape away from the farm in order to supplement their income."

3D X-ray to reveal secrets of "unreadable" scroll

"Having the chance to unlock a part of Norfolk history which has been closed to us for maybe hundreds of years feels very special," said Gary Tuson, from the Norfolk Records Office about plans to x-ray a 15th century scroll that is too delicate to unroll.

Clan Macneil aids in restoration of Kisimul Castle

Members of Clan Macneil have joined forces with Historic Scotland to raise UK£200,000 for the restoration of Kisimul Castle in Barra. The 15th century fortress was the stronghold of the clan in the Western Isles.

University of Southampton receives grant to study Roman ports

The European Research Council has awarded the University of Southampton a EU€2.49m (UK£2.1m) grant to study 31 roman ports in nine countries. The study will focus on ports in the Mediterranean region during the first two centuries CE.

Cardiff Castle re-moated

After ceremonies to mark the conclusion of Bute Park's restoration, the waterworks were opened and Cardiff Castle's moat was filled for the first time in 30 years. During the restoration, the moat was excavated by archaeologists, revealing more than 3,000 items dating back to the 16th century.

Mead making a comeback

Over the centuries, mead, the "drink of kings and Vikings," has lost its place of honor to other alcoholic beverages, but now, the honey-based drink is making a comeback. Kim Gittleson, of the BBC, has the story.

Roman skulls unearthed by "lost" London river

The Walborn River used to run through London until it was paved over in the 15th century. Recently the river made it's presence known when 20 skulls, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, were discovered washed from a Roman burial site.

Horse and rider return to Mildenhall

In 1997, the remains of an Anglo Saxon warrior and his horse were discovered, along with over 400 other graves, at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England. Now the horse and rider have come home for display at the Mildenhall Museum.

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

"Rare, multifunctional oven" found in England

"It's almost certainly a rare, multifunctional oven, with a shelf like a pizza oven for bread, and you could have finished off the malting process for barley and dried grain," said Dr John Jolleys about the discovery of a 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon oven in Sedgeford, England. (photo)

Scotland's Tapestry Project

Needleworkers in Scotland have created a very cool tapestry project, the world's largest, according to the BBC.

Yorkshire chapel may be Richard III's

A team of archaeologists from the University of York believe they have discovered the remains of a 15th century chapel ordered to be built by Richard III to commemorate the Battle of Towton (1461).

13th century volcano changed climate

Medieval texts record an abrupt cooling in the weather in the middle of the 13th century, including a terrible summer in 1258. Now a group of scientists believe they have found the source of the cooling: the eruption of the Samalas Volcano on Lombok Island, Indonesia.

Lincoln Castle excavations yield interesting finds

Construction of a new museum to house a copy of the Magna Carta at Lincoln Castle in England has halted after the discovery of the remains of a church, human skeletons and other artifacts. Among the finds was a sarcophagus, believed to contains the bones of "somebody terribly important." (photos)

"Traditional methods" used to preserve Hadrian's Wall

"Hadrian's Wall is under constant pressure from the weather, from visitors, from livestock and other factors, and we need to work hard to protect and to conserve this icon of world heritage," said Bryan Scott, from the Hadrian's Wall Trust about the recent grant to rebuild parts of the wall.

Mystery of the disappearing manor solved

Once upon a time, a medieval manor house graced the countryside of Leicestershire, then it disappeared. Today the land is a sheep pasture, at least until archaeologists reveal what lies beneath the field.

Lindisfarne Gospels turn over a new leaf

It's a time for celebration in Durham, England, as a page is turned in the 1,300-year-old Lindisfarne Gospels. Carefully-regulated, early visitors viewed two pages of the open book: the Canon Tables, but for the remainder of the exhibition, the book will be opened to a portrait of St John the Evangelist. (photo)

Illumination meets graffiti to celebrate the Lindisfarne Gospels

Dutch graffiti artist Niels Meulman, AKA Shoe, is no stranger to medieval manuscripts, having been inspired by such works as the Irish Gaelic poem Pangur Bán, so it isn't surprising that he has been chosen to help celebrate the return of the Lindisfarne Gospels to the north of England as part of an exhibition.