BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Lindisfarne Gospels turn over a new leaf

It's a time for celebration in Durham, England, as a page is turned in the 1,300-year-old Lindisfarne Gospels. Carefully-regulated, early visitors viewed two pages of the open book: the Canon Tables, but for the remainder of the exhibition, the book will be opened to a portrait of St John the Evangelist. (photo)

Illumination meets graffiti to celebrate the Lindisfarne Gospels

Dutch graffiti artist Niels Meulman, AKA Shoe, is no stranger to medieval manuscripts, having been inspired by such works as the Irish Gaelic poem Pangur Bán, so it isn't surprising that he has been chosen to help celebrate the return of the Lindisfarne Gospels to the north of England as part of an exhibition.

Shropshire ring declared treasure

The coroner in Shropshire, England has declared 6th century gold ring, found by a metal detectorist, treasure. The ring, which weighs 8.21g (0.3oz), probably belonged to an individual of high status. (photo)

"Hill of Deer" may have been medieval hunting park

Aerial photography has been used to discover what experts believe was a royal deer park in Gwynedd, Wales, where nobles would have gathered "for entertaining and forging alliances.” The park is located on the Brynkir estate at Dolbenmaen and dates to the reign of Prince Llywelyn the Great in the 13th Century.

Medieval handbell re-created

Archaeologists know what early medieval handbells looked like from the "rusty shadows in the museum case" that still exist, but not what these bells sounded like. Now a team of experts from the National Museum of Scotland has re-created such a bell, "used by Scottish monks more than 1,000 years ago." (photo)

Archaeologists consider meaning of Mingary Castle arrowhead

Mingary Castle, overlooking the Sound of Mull in Scotland, may have had a more violent past than once believed, according to experts pondering the discovery of an iron arrowhead. (photo)

"Lost" medieval village found beneath Southwell

Archaeologist Matt Beresford is hoping that his team will find conclusive evidence that a "lost" pre-Norman village may be found beneath the streets of the Nottinghamshire town of Southwell. The project was being funded by a UK£5,800 Heritage Lottery grant. (photos)

"We are the collateral descendants of Richard III, we speak on behalf of him"

The Plantagenet Alliance has not given up. They want the bones of their king. Who are these people? "We are the collateral [non-direct] descendants of Richard III, we speak on behalf of him, the only people who can speak on behalf of him," replied Vanessa Roe, the group's spokesperson.

Bid made to analyze bones of Alfred the Great

In 2010, the Hyde900 community group was set up to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the founding of Hyde Abbey, the presumed burial place of King Alfred the Great. Now the organization has appled to have the remains of the King analyzed in order to prove their legitimacy.

Archaeological survey hopes to locate War of the Roses battlefield

Historical documents show that in 1460 a decisive battle took place on the grounds of Northampton's Delapre Abbey, leading to Yorkist Edward lV taking the throne of England, but the actual site of the battle has never been identified. Now archaeologists hope to locate the site before the area becomes a sports field.

Mars discoveries tweeted in Latin

It's only fitting that Mars, the Roman god of war, would be the subject of NASA's first official venture into the world of Latin social media with photos of the surface of the planet taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Latin captions were sent August 28, 2013 on Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook.

Archaeologists wish for project to protect Roman mosaics

Nearly 50 years ago, archaeologists uncovered a pair of beautiful mosaic floors, dating to the Roman era, at Chedworth Villa in Gloucestershire, England. Now the floors have been uncovered for study, leading to a discussion of a permanent building to house them. (photo)

Viking sword from Isle of Man on display

Showcased at the ongoing Heroes exhibition at the Jorvik Viking Centre in York are the fragments of a highly-decorated Viking sword, discovered in 2008 by metal detector enthusiasts Rob Farrer and Daniel Crowe on the Isle of Man. The sword dates to the 10th century. (photo)

The "Formula 1" of jousting events

Stacey Evans is a world-class jouster. As Sir Edward Stacey, he took part recently in a medieval joust at Carisbrooke Castle, a motte-and-bailey structure, on the Isle of Wight. Stacy was interviewed in a short video from the BBC.

Archaeologists search for graves at Flodden

In September 1513, thousands of bodies were buried on or around the battlefield of Flodden in Northumberland, England. Now, 500 years later, excavation has taken place to locate and protect the remains and to declare the burials as war dead.

Will and Kate's conjugal arms

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has approved the conjugal arms of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, a combination of the coats of arms of the Royal Family and the Middleton arms.

Charles Brandon's falconry vervel shows royal connection

Charles Brandon, the first duke of Suffolk, was a great chum of Henry VIII. In fact, he married Henry's sister Mary. Evidence of this royal connection was discovered recently in the form of a silver vervel found in a Norfolk, England field.

Bath Abbey threatened by its dead

Bath Abbey, the late 15th century church that looms over the Roman ruins in Bath, England, is under siege -- by the dead. Not zombies, but over 6,000 bodies, threaten to lift the abbey's floor and collapse the building.

The stonemasons of Lincoln

Medieval cathedrals are awe-inspiring. Equally inspiring are the stonemasons and carvers who originally built the structures and who keep them maintained to this very day. The BBC has a short video on the stonemasons of Lincoln Cathedral, where construction began in the 11th century.

Modelling Mary

The team who created the 3D face of Richard III, have now been comissioned to produce a virtual face of Mary, Queen of Scots as she would have looked in her 20s. The image is part of the new exhibition at the Scottish National Museum in Edinburgh. (photo)

Richard III to be honored with Leicester museum

The Leicester City Council has approved plans to construct a UK£4m Richard III museum on and around the car park where the king's remains were discovered. The building is expected to be completed in 2014. (slideshow)

Marlowe novel sparks hostility

All Ros Barber did was write a novel that theorizes that Shakespeare's plays were written by Christopher Marlowe, but The Marlowe Papers, written entirely in verse, has brought back up the dispute over the authorship of the Bard's plays.

Are you a witch?

If you lived in the 16th or 17th centuries, would you have been accused of witchcraft? HistoryExtra.com, the official website of BBC History Magazine, offers a quiz. Check to see if you are in danger by clicking the link below.

The sad life of Elizabethan child actors

Elizabethan theater life may have been booming for playwrights such as Shakespeare, but it was not so rosy for children in theatrical troupes. University of Oxford professor, Dr Bart van Es, discovered evidence of systemic child abuse while researching his book, Shakespeare in Company.

Danelaw gravestone auctioned for UK£4,300

An unnamed London company recently purchased a 9th century, Anglo Saxon gravestone, engraved with a Celtic cross, for UK£4,300 at an auction by Duke's Auctioneers of Dorchester, England. The stone was original discovered "during road construction in the early 20th Century at Little Eaton, Derbyshire."

Is there a "real" message in the Voynich manuscript?

The 15th century Voynich manuscript may be considered "the world's most mysterious medieval manuscript," and quite possibly a hoax, but a new study by theoretical physicist Marcelo Montemurro, published in the journal Plus One, theorizes that the book has a "genuine message."

Coroner's inquest finds coin pendant treasure

A coroner's inquest has declared an "early-medieval gold pendant created from an imitation of a Byzantine coin," found in a field in Norfolk, England, to be treasure. The necklace was created as an imitation of a Byzantine-era coin, and is believed to have been made in France. (photo)

Panels "hacked" from Devon church

Sometime in the week of August 2-9, 2013, vandals "hacked out" two 15th century, decorative oak panels, bearing the images of saints from Holy Trinity Church in Torbryan, England. The panels were part of a screen and "one of the best examples of their kind left in Britain." (video)

Lottery money to help Chester Farm

2,000 years of English history will be open for study thanks to a UK£4m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore and investigate various sites at Chester Farm, in Irchester, England.

Branagh to bring Macbeth to New York stage

Sir Kenneth Branagh will bring his version of "the Scottish play" by William Shakespeare to the drill hall of the Park Avenue Armory in New York City in June 2014. Sir Kenneth said: "I am delighted that we have the chance to recreate Macbeth in this epic setting."