BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Roman burial ground a surprise for Lincolnshire archaeologists

Water company workers in Lincolnshire, England were surprised recently to uncover a very large Roman cemetery dating to the 1st century CE. So far the graves have yielded artifacts as well as 30 skeletons.

The truth about Cleopatra's good looks.

A silver denarius minted in 32 B.C. shows that the fabled image of Cleopatra is not what she really looked like.

14th century astrolabe to be auctioned

A 14th century astrolabe quadrant, discovered beneath the clay floors of a 17th century building in Kent, England, has been listed for auction March 21, 2007 with hopes to bring between UK£60,000 and UK£100,000.

York grave holds Roman murder victim

Archaeologists working on a large Roman cemetery in York, England have discovered, among the remains of wealthy and poor alike, the bones of a murder victim. "She was stabbed seven times in the throat from the front," said Osteo-archaeologist Malin Holst.

Anglo-Saxon Finds in East Sussex Church

Renovations on St Andrew's Church, at Bishopstone, near Seaford, have revealed Anglo-Saxon features dated back as far as the late 7th Century. This puts the age of the church back 100 years compared to previous datings.

Devil's Music in the Vatican

Rock and roll music will represent Hell in a new opera based upon Dante's medieval epic, The Divine Comedy. The composition by Monsignor Marco Frisina will premiere in Vatican City.

Turkish Archaeologist Not Anti-Islam, Court Finds

Muazzez Ilmiye Cig's research into ancient Sumer led her to the conclusion that headscarves were worn in that culture's sexual rites. But when she made this claim in her book, the 92-year-old archaeologist found herself in court accused of insulting Muslim women.

Mosaics Highlight Roman Villa Discovery

Archaeologists have discovered "evidence of a substantial Roman villa with a mosaic floor in the main room" in the Quantock Hills of Somerset, England. The site is one of the most westerly Roman villas yet found in England.

Kent Gets Bronze Age Cup Back

A Bronze Age cup found in Kent by a metal detector enthusiast will return to the county on loan from the British Museum. The Ringlemere Gold Cup is one of only seven from the period found in Britain.

UNESCO Gives Warning on Tower of London Status

The United Nations cultural body UNESCO has warned that the Tower of London may be in danger of losing its World Heritage status, and has asked the United Kingdom to submit by 2007 a report on measures being taken to protect the Tower.

Welsh Barn Holds Secret: Medieval Dining Hall

Homeowners in Hengoed in Denbighshire, Wales were surprised to learn that a barn on their 21-acre farm contained a secret: the building was originally a rare, 15th medieval hall.

English Monastery Nominated for World Heritage Status

The Venerable Bede's monastic home has been put forward as a possible UNESCO World Heritage Site. If selected, it will gain that status in 2009.

"Hound of Hartlepool" Baffles Experts

The 600-year-old bronze silhouette of a snarling dog has stumped experts who are trying to puzzle out its use. Weathervane? "Beware of Dog" sign? They aren't sure what to make of the crudely cut image, unearthed by Tees Archaeology.

"Totally Unique" Roman Bathhouse Discovered in Kent, England

Archaeologists working on a Roman dig in Kent, England are enthusiastic about the remains of a 5th century Roman bath, calling it "totally unique" for the county.

Report of Pyramid Find in Ukraine

An archaeological team working in eastern Ukraine claims to have found pyramids.

Animal Sacrifices or Something the Cat Dragged in?

A new study of burial cairns and brochs has led researchers to question whether animal remains found at the sites were offerings to the dead or merely "something the cat dragged in."

CSI Needed for Roman Crime?

An archaeological team working near Sedgeford,England may need the help of criminal investigators to solve a 1500-year-old mystery: was the skeleton found pushed into the oven of a Roman farm murdered?

13th Century Letters Returned to Poland

A collection of Papal letters, written as far back as the 13th century and discovered among the belongings of a Wisconsin WWII vet, have been returned to their proper owner: the Polish State Archives.

Scotland Hopes to Crack Down on Crime and Violence by Banning Swords

Scottish Justice Minister Cathy Jamieson has announced that the new ban on the sale of knives and swords in the United Kingdom will help stem knife violence in the country. So far, over 12,000 blades have been turned in to authorities.

Possible Benedictine Guesthouse Found Under Pub

Archaeologists believe they have unearthed a medieval Benedictine hostelry beneath a pub near Byland Abbey near Coxwold.

300 Skeletons Unearthed in 6th Century Burial

The excavation of a burial site in Aberdeen, Scotland has disclosed over 300 skeletons. The dig was part of the renovation of St. Nicholas Church, one of the oldest in Scotland.

Saxon and Norman Artifacts Found in Southampton Dig

Excavation of a future construction site in Southampton, UK produced artifacts from the eleventh, fourteenth and twentieth centuries.

Recreating Roman Cosmetics

A Roman reenactor and museum manager gave a demonstration of Roman cosmetics at a Roman "military spectacular" in Wales earlier this month.

Record Price for 14th-century English Coin

One of only three known Edward III double florins went for UK£460,000 at Spink auction house. The coin has a face value of six shillings.

Public Allowed to Join in Welsh Dig

Members of the public will have an opportunity to help excavate the site of an early Christian cemetery in Pembrokeshire.

Mont Saint-Michel to "Float" Again

Once an island, the Benedictine abbey of Mont Saint-Michel in Normandy has become connected to the mainland by a buildup of silt. New plans by French engineers will return the landmark to its island status.

Medieval Monks, Workers to be Reburied

The bodies of 44 medieval monks and workers discovered during the contruction of an overpass in Partney, England, were reburied in mid-June.

14th Century Manor to Reopen

A 14th Century hall in on the banks of the River Welland in Lincolnshire that was restored with a UK£600,000 lottery grant is reopening as an art gallery and museum. It will contain 10 galleries, including the history of the local fens and how the landscape was created by drainage and reclamation.

17th Fairway Yields Medieval Ruins

The 17th fairway of a golf course under development in East Lothian has revealed the ruins of houses dating back from the 12th-15th centuries.

Bamburg Sword Unlike Any Other in the World

Experts at the Royal Armouries in Leeds have declared a 7th century sword, discovered at Bamburgh Castle in 1960, unique in the world.