BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

White Horse painted purple by vandals

Members of two groups that urge UK courts to take greater notice of divorced fathers' rights denied vandalizing the White Horse of Uffington with purple paint.

Former tour guide campaigns for statue of Henry VII

Melanie Phillips, a former tour guide at Pembroke Castle in Wales, has begun a campaign to construct a memorial to King Henry VII, who was born in the castle.

Vicar invokes medieval archery practice law

The vicar of Collingbourne Ducis in Wiltshire has enforced the ancient law, never taken off the books, that allows her to summon the village to archery practice. Those complying with the call to service were rewarded with food and drink.

Blackadder's codpiece brings UK£850 at auction

Rowan Atkinson's codpiece from the Blackadder television series was just one of the media-related items sold at auction by Cameo Auctioneers in Midgham in Berkshire, England.

Anglo-Saxon settlement discovered in the Cotswolds

Steve Sheldon, of Cotswold Archaeology, has called the recent discovery of an Anglo-Saxon timber hall in Cheltenham, England "one of the best finds of his career." The settlement is believed to date between the 6th and 8th centuries.

"Treasure" badge likely belonged to Richard III's retainer

A silver-gilt boar badge representing Richard III and found last year at Bosworth Field has been declared treasure. The badge probably belonged to a member of the king's inner circle and may indicate the spot where he fell.

Maps: "Snapshots" of history

Most of us think of a map as a tool for getting from one place to another. But throughout history, mapmakers have had other priorities than providing a factual picture of the world.

Precious Cambridge manuscript collection now online

The entire Parker library, a collection of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts at Corpus Christi College of Cambridge University, has been made accessible online. Librarian Suzanne Paul narrates a video tour of the collection's highlights.

Cave scanning project includes Robin Hood dungeon

The dungeon where, according to tradition, the Sheriff of Nottingham held Robin Hood captive is to be laser scanned as part of a new project. Archaeologists at the University of Nottingham will scan all the caves in the area during the two-year Nottingham Caves Survey. 

Rare 12th century coins found in England

What is being called "one of the biggest hoards" of 12th century silver coins has been found by metal dectorists near Knaresborough, England. The 178 coins date to the reign of Henry I. Meanwhile, in Gloucester, four pennies, of an unknown variety, have been found. (photo)

British craftsmen strive to preserve "lost" skills

When its last practioner died in 1958, the art of pole lathe bowl turning died with him, but now former forester Robin Wood has taken up the foot-powered lathe to revive the craft. (photos)

Connected History project offers help to historians

BBC Technology correspondent Mark Ward reports that a new search engine has been created to help historians find useful sources.

"Exceptional example of the Medieval jewellers' art" declared treasure in England

A 16th century silver crucifix depicting Christ flanked by the Virgin Mary and John the Evangelist, discovered in 2009 in Yanworth, England, has been declared treasure. (photo)

Saxon artifact puzzles experts

Microscopes, X-rays and CAT scans have, so far, been used to identify a recent discovery of a Saxon object from an archaeological dig at The Meads in Kent, with no results. The circular silver, bronze and wooden disk is believed to be a mount, but no one is sure. (photos)

Keep Off the Wall

Walkers along Hadrian's Wall are being urged to respect the ancient structure and help to protect it.

Mary Rose carpenter's dog honored with museum display

In 1545, the Mary Rose sank during the Battle of the Solent. Trapped inside the carpenter's cabin was a dog, probably kept to catch rats. Now the skeleton of the animal, nicknamed "Hatch," is on display at the Mary Rose Museum at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

Google to digitize Italian libraries

Google has signed an agreement to digitize one million books, written before 1868, from libraries in Rome and Florence. The books will be free on Google Books.

Keeping Alive the Language Jesus Spoke

In the village of Maaloula, Syria, the ancient language Aramaic is still spoken but endangered.

Lasers to be used to clean historic paintings

Long used to clean metal and stone, lasers may be the new tool of choice for cleaning famous works of art. The technique is the same used to remove tattoos.

Hidden bee hive found at Rosslyn Chapel

As workers carefully dismantled several roof pinnacles at Rosslyn Chapel during a UK£13M renovation project, they found that one of the pinnacles was deliberately hollowed out during its fabrication to make a beehive.

York's "Ivory Bangle Lady" of African origin

Recent analysis of a Roman burial in the city of York show that the remains belonged to a "high status" woman of African origin. Dubbed the "Ivory Bangle Lady," the woman was buried in the late 4th century along with "items including jet and elephant ivory bracelets, earrings, beads and a blue glass jug." (photos)

Experts believe they have found true site of Battle of Bosworth Field

A new study of documents, artifacts, and archaeological surveys seem to prove the true location of the Battle of Bosworth, the site of the death of King Richard of England. (map & photo)

12th century leper hospital explored in England

A team of young archeologists is excavating the site of the St Mary Magdalen leper hospital in Winchester. A BBC video chronicles the recent finds at the site. (video)

Burial a "glimpse into Sleaford's Roman past"

Recent archaeological finds in the town of Sleaford, England prove that the town "was a very large and important settlement in the Roman period." Among the discoveries were the skeleton of a 4th century woman.

Roman bones show life of "disease and hard labour"

The discovery of a Roman grave in Weston-super-Mare, England last year has given experts insight into the life of 2nd-4th century Roman inhabitants of Britain. This particular man, aged between 36 and 45,  lived a life "defined by disease and hard labour."

Late medieval walls found below Edinburgh esplanade

Construction on new viewing stands for the Edinburgh Military Tattoo has revealed two structures dating to the late medieval period. The walls were believed to have formed part of the defense of the castle.

Brits balk at paying Henry's "Deer Tax"

500 years ago, merchants abutting Bushy Park in London were required to pay a "deer tax," a compensation for any deer which left the park. Today, the tax is still in effect and taxpayers are getting restless.

Medieval and Renaissance Galleries open at the V&A

"We're wanting to shed light on the dark Middle Ages," said chief curator Peta Motture about lighting conditions at the new Medieval and Renaissance exhibits at London's Victoria and Albert Museum. Tim Masters, entertainment and arts correspondent for BBC News has the story.

Cross slabs discovered after church fire

The recent devastating fire at St. Brandon's Church in Brancepeth, near Durham City, England was a tragedy, but one with "a silver lining." what the fire revealed were 20 medieval tombstones dating to the 12th and 13th centuries. (video)

Shakespeare's New Place to be excavated

Archaeologists in Stratford-upon-Avon are preparing to excavate the New Place, the remains of Shakespeare's last home.