BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Accidental death in Tudor England

Oxford University historian, Dr. Steven Gunn, has undertaken the task of scouring 16th Century coroners' reports to compile a list of accidental deaths in Tudor, England. The list includes death by bears and archery accidents.

Cotswold dig reveals life in the 13th and 14th centuries

An archaeological team from Cotswold Archaeology is leading a dig at Cowl Lane in Winchcombe, England, revealing "more than 40 rubbish pits containing medieval pottery, animal bone and metalworking evidence."

Long live King Arthur

In an article for BBC Magazine, Jon Kelly discusses the endurance of King Arthur as a cultural phenomenon and his latest incarnation on British television.

Russell Crowe views living history in Scotland

Actor Russell Crowe brought his star power with him on a recent visit to Duncarron Fort, a replica medieval village in the Carron Valley, Scotland where he found the project "very impressive" and said it would be a version of "living history".

Traditional restoration for 15th century bridge

The 15th century bridge in Bridgend, England gave the town its name. Now the town will give something back by using traditional methods to give the bridge a facelift.

Stirling restored

Those gentles making the journey to Scotland will want to include Stirling Castle on their itinerary. The castle is in the midst of being completely restored. BBC News has a slideshow of the results.

Roman "savings bank" discovered in Colchester

"What you're looking at is how somebody managed their savings, taking some out and putting some back in probably over a number of years," said Philip Crummy from the Colchester Archaeological Trust about the recent discovery of over 1200 Roman coins in two clay pots.

Prayer book and crucifix of Mary Queen of Scots reunited in Scotland

As she walked to the scaffold to be executed, Mary Queen of Scots carried an ornate crucifix and a Book of Hours. Now both artifacts, thought to have been carried by Mary, were reunited for a day at Loretto School in Musselburgh, East Lothian. (photo)

The many centuries of Glastonbury Abbey

A new study of pottery fragments excavated during the 1950s and 1960s at Glastonbury Abbey shows that many historical periods were represented and that the abbey dates to a later period than previously believed.

Archaeologists hope to find Shakespeare's final home

Excavations are under way at New Place, in Stratford-upon-Avon, the site of William Shakespeare's last home. The site, which has not been excavated to the level of Tudor times, has already yielded some artifacts of the period.

360 degrees of Westminster Abbey

Delighted by the royal wedding and dazzled by the venue? If so, you may want to visit the BBC's 360 degree virtual tour of Westminster Abbey.

Time Team finds Anglo-Saxon hall

Channel 4's Time Team recently carried out an archaeological project at Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland, England where it discovered the floor of what they believe is a medieval hall.

New pilgrim trail to cross Wales

"North Wales is a landscape charged with a history of faith, and this particular pilgrim route will be, for all who follow it, a true path towards the light, supported by all those living memories of prayer and holy lives," said Dr. Rowan Williams about the new pilgrim trail across Wales.

Tomb of St Francis of Assisi re-opens

A special Franciscan mass will celebrate the re-opening of the restored tomb of St Francis of Assisi in Umbria, Italy. The saint died in 1226. (photo)

Exhumation of Mona Lisa planned

"We can put an end to a centuries-old dispute and also understand Leonardo's relations to his models," said art historian Silvano Vinceti, who plans to exhume the body of Lisa Gherardini, believed to have been the model for da Vinci's famous painting.

Mass grave at Bedlam discovered

Archaeologists working at the site of London's latest Crossrail project have discovered a mass grave of hundreds of skeletons. The grave is at the location of St Bethlehem hospital, the first facility for mental patients. (video & photos)

Battle of Towton commemorated in podcast

550 years ago, 28,000 men were killed in what is considered Britain's bloodiest battle. To commemorate the anniversary, BBC 4 Today discusses the final brawl of the war of the Roses.

Cardigan Castle to receive UK£4.7m grant

The Heritage Lottery Fund has agreed to provide UK£4.7m for conservation work to the building and grounds at Cardigan Castle. The 12th century castle was once home to Welsh princes.

Roman quarry "too obvious" for notice

Archaeologist Karl-James Langford believes historians may have overlooked a Roman quarry in Barry, Wales because it was just "too obvious."

"Senchus fer nAlban"

In the 7th century, seventy lines of text were created to record the number of men in western Scotland for the purpose of military service and tax collection. The Senchus fer nAlban (History of the men of Scotland) includes resources for the population of Dál Riata, the Kingdom of the Gaels on the west coast of Scotland. (photos)

Historic Cornwall pub destroyed by fire

"People come from all over the world to see the Pandora," said Mylor, England resident Cordelia Folland after a fire ripped through the 13th Century thatched Pandora Inn March 24, 2011.

The sturdy skull of Simon of Sudbury

During the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, Simon Theobald, once Lord Chancellor of England and Archbishop of Canterbury, was beheaded outside the Tower of London. Now his mummified skull is being given the scientific treatment.

Brush up on Magna Carta history

In preparation for celebration of the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta, the BBC offers information about the historic document.

Neighbours from hell, in the 14th century

BBC news magazine recently carried a 14th century 'Asbo' (English acronym for Anti-Social Behaviour Order) -- a complaint from one London neighbour against another about her 'creative' waste disposal,  that piped her privy straight into a nearby gutter.

Medieval beaver to be reintroduced in Wales

The beaver, extinct in Wales since the 12th century, is being reintroduced to Machynlleth, Wales. The European beaver was prized for its fur and the medicinal qualities of its glands.

16th century defenses discovered at Stirling Castle

Renovation work for the gift shop at Scotland's historic Stirling Castle has unearthed the castle's 16th century defenses, which were built using the latest techniques around 1540. The defences were demolished during modernization in the 18th century.

Welsh school site hides rare Roman fort

The playing fields of Dwr-y-Felin Comprehensive Upper School in Neath, Wales must occupy a strategic location since they were the site of not one, but two Roman forts, a 1st century timber structure and a later stone fort.

Ryght welebeloued Voluntyne...

In 1477 Margery Brews sent the first valentine in the English language to her sweetheart John Paston begining "ryght welebeloued Voluntyne" (right well-beloved Valentine), she promised to be a good wife, adding: "Yf that ye loffe me as Itryste verely that ye do ye will not leffe me" (If you love me, I trust.. you will not leave me).

Did wicker help build Stonehenge?

For thousands of years, experts have debated how the huge stones that constitute Stonehenge were transported from Wales to their current site in southern England. Now engineer Garry Lavin has a new theory: wicker. (photo)

Children's author Brian Jacques dies in England

The animal residents of Redwall Abbey are in mourning over the death of their creator, Brian Jacques, who died of a heart attack in Liverpool, England at the age of 71. Jacques wrote 21 novels in the Redwall series.