BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Dunster cobblestones "extremely dangerous”

Once part of the Luttrell family estate, the village of Dunster, England could lose its medieval cobbled streets due to injuries caused by the cobbles' poor condition.

Sumptuary laws plagued Renaissance bankers

"Our state is less strong because money which should navigate and multiply lies dead, converted into vanities,"  said the rulers of Venice, who enforced laws designed to curb the spending habits of the rich. These sumptuary laws are the subject of an article by Sarah Dunant on the BBC News Magazine blog.

Trees threaten Roman wall in St. Albans

Sycamore trees are the culprits in damage done to the historic Roman wall in St. Albans, England. Built in the 3rd century, the wall is what remains of a five metres high and three metres wide wall, circling the city, with a walkway on top. (photo)

Horse archery making comback in Europe

Horse archery is a sport appreciated by only a few, but its popularity is gaining strength in England which now holds a national championship.

Welsh students hope to find medieval Whitelands

Teacher Karl James Langford and his students are on a quest: to find the lost medieval village of Whitelands near Porthkerry in Wales.

Berryfield Mosaic removal and conservation underway

"The main trouble is getting it through the door," said Nick Barnfield, project conservator with Cliveden Conservation, about the removal of the Berryfield mosaic at Colchester Castle, once the dining room floor of a 2nd century Roman townhouse.

Brits recognize Druidry as a religion

The British Charity Commission has accepted that druids' worship of natural spirits is a religious activity, making it the first pagan practice to be given official recognition as a religion.

16th century Scottish archway destroyed in vehicle crash

An historic, 16th century stone archway on the grounds of Scone Palace in Perthshire was destroyed recently when a van driven by a contractor crashed into it.

BBC articles on Scottish history listed

Scottish history buffs with time on their hands will want to check out the BBC Scotland's website which features a links list of stories and videos relating to Scottish history.

From a falcon's eye view

Ever wish you could fly like a falcon? Now you can, with a little help from technology and the internet. Experts for the BBC have attached tiny cameras to the backs of a Peregrine Falcon and the Goshawk. The resultant video is amazing. (video)

Anglo-Saxon ring centerpiece of BBC archaeology program

An exceptional gold ring, sporting "four beasts' heads with inlaid blue and yellow glass eyes" will be featured on a new BBC program Digging for Britain, focussing on Bristol, England and Berkeley Castle. (photo)

Pre-Viking settlement found on Isle of Man may have "international importance"

Archaeologist Harold Mytum believes that a pre-Viking settlement at Port y Candas on the Isle of Man was probably the home of an important leader who could "support the craftsmen who would have worked making tools, weapons and bronze jewellery."

Saxon boat uncovered in England

A Saxon-era boat has been discovered during flood defense construction along the River Ant in Norfolk, England.

Roman armor found in Wales

A complete suit of armor has been found at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in southern Wales. The armor was found on what is believed to be the top floor of a warehouse.

Experts debate meaning of symbols on Pictish stones

The debate continues among archeologists and linguists over the symbols on over 200 carved stones dating to the time of the Picts in Scotland. Archeologists feel that the carvings are "symbolic markings that communicated information."

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

How Normans changed the English language forever

In 1066, William the Conqueror invaded England. Since then, Norman names, such as William, Henry and Alice, have dominated Brittish naming preferences, and it is in the language where they may have left their greatest mark.

Major Roman road found in south-eastern Serbia

An eight meter wide, stone block road, dating to the first century, has been discovered near the town of Dimitrovgrad, Serbia. Archaeologists believe the road was part of the Via Militaris, a major Roman military road.

Rare roof finial found in the Thames

A roof finial shaped like an animal has been found along the river Thames during a Museum of London archaeological survey. [photo]

Tewkesbury Medieval Fair features 11th century Saxon poop

Discovered in 1991 in Gloucestershire, England, a small pile of 11th century human feces has become something of a phenonmenon with the British public, drawing 11,000 visitors to the Discovery Zone of the Cheltenham Science Festival. Recently the exhibit was displayed at the Tewkesbury Medieval Fair.

"Seventh signal" leads to medieval seal

British metal detectorist David Booth, who in 2009 discovered four Iron Age torcs, has made another important discovery: a 13th century silver seal bearing a carving of a Roman figure in red jasper. (photo)

Infant remains may indicate Roman brothel

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman villa in the Thames Valley of England are looking for an explanation for a mass burial of 97 infants, all having died soon after birth. Experts believe the site may have been a brothel.

Stonemasons' university at Edinburgh cathedral

Medieval skills and traditions are passed on to a new generation of stonemasons each year at the stonemasonry workshop at St Mary's Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland. The workshop is a joint effort by the cathedral and Telford College.

Drawbridge collapse traps visitors in "fairy tale castle"

Fifty-one visitors to Castell Coch in Tongwynlais near Cardiff, Wales got more than they bargained for when a maintenance crane collapsed the castle's drawbridge, trapping the visitors inside. No one was injured.

Cornish find redraws map of Roman Britain

Roman artifacts have been discovered at a fortress in Cornwall formerly believed to be an exclusively Iron Age site. This find revises the historical view of the Roman occupation of Britain, which had been thought not to extend so far southwest.

Medieval synagogue discovered under English fast food shop

Archaeologists have found the remains of a medieval synagogue beneath Kebabish, a fast food restaurant, in Northamptonshire, England.

Shell analysis confirms early Virginia accounts

An analysis of oyster shells thrown away by colonists in Jamestown, Virginia, indicates that historical accounts of a severe drought in 1611-1612 are correct. The shells show that the James River was much saltier during those years than in the present day, indicating lower rainfall.

Living with volcanoes

Inspired by his plane's detour to avoid the Icelandic ash cloud, historian David Cannadine looks at ways that volcanoes have affected human life throughout history.

13th century heraldic badge found in Coventry

A copper badge bearing three heraldic lions has been found in a stone wall in Coventry, England. The badge probably came from a horse harness.

CSI: Middle Ages

The corpse was identified as royalty. Bones found in the Magdeburg Cathedral in 2008 proved to be those of a granddaughter of Alfred the Great: the Saxon Queen Eadgyth, the who died in the 10th century at the age of 36.