BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Coventry's stained glass featured in BBC slideshow

The Parish Church Cathedral of St Michael in Coventry, England was constructed in the 12th century. In World War II, it was destroyed when the city of Coventry was bombed and burned. Before the destruction, five historic windows were removed and are now the subjest of a BBC slideshow.

British Male Progeniture and Act of Settlement overturned

A vote by the 16 members of the British Commonwealth has allowed a daughter of William and Catherine the possibility to ascend to the British throne. The rule of male primogeniture, giving males precedence over females in British royalty, dating to 1689, was recently overturned.

Pin-pointing Hastings

Battle Abbey and its surrounds, the traditional site of the Battle of Hastings between King Harold and William the Conqueror, may not be the actual site of the battle, according to a new book by Nick Austin, Secrets Of The Norman Invasion.

Restoration of Newcastle's Black Gate planned

In the 13th century, Henry III built the Black Gate at Newcastle, England's castle to help beef up the defenses of the City. Now the City Council has been awarded UK£1.4m by the Heritage Lottery Fund to make the site available to the public.

Bodleian Library digitizes Mishneh Torah

One of the most important manuscripts in the Bodleian Library's Hebrew collection is the 12th century Mishneh Torah, a guide to Jewish law handwritten and signed by Hebrew scholar Maimonides. The manuscript has now been digitized and is available online.

Remains of fifteen Anglo-Saxons given Christian burial

Last year, fifteen skeletons dating to Angelo Saxon times were discovered during a construction project at the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Bicester, England. Recently the remains were re-interred in a church memorial garden. (video)

Scottish archaeologists investigate vitrified fort

1,300 years ago, a tribe of warriors tried in vain to defend a fort below Abbey Craig in Stirling, Scotland. Their failure led to the total destruction, or vitrification, of the fort by fire. Recently archaeologists spent four days investigating the site.

Own an ancient English Monument

For a mere UK£30,000, interested parties can purchase a two acre site in Driffield, England containing Moot Hill, where archaeologists believe an 11th century motte and bailey castle may have stood.

"The seal of Tristan of Treago" found in Cornwall

Metal dectorist John Fereday was "so excited that his hands were shaking" when he discovered a 13th century silver seal on a farm near Newquay in Cornwall. "Medieval seals are very rare in Cornwall and silver ones are rarer still," said liaisons officer Anna Tyacke.

Cardigan Castle receives UK£4.5m lottery grant

For the past ten years, the Friends of Cardigan Castle in Wales have been hoping to raise money for restoration of the 12th Century building, the first stone castle built by the Welsh princes and the stronghold of Rhys ap Gruffydd. Now they have received an award of UK£4.5m European money.

Welsh Iron Age tomb links to Stonehenge

Archaeologists working at the Carn Menyn site in the Preseli Hills in Wales, where the Stonehenge bluestones were quarried, believe they have found the tomb of one of original builders monument.

Nonsuch Palace rebuilt

Nonsuch Palace, the Surrey home of Henry VIII, built to rival French King, Francis I, has been rebuilt - as a 2.2m by 1.2m (7ft 2in by 3ft 11in) model. (photo)

Golden torcs bring finder £462,000 reward

David Booth is a happy man. The hoard of gold Iron Age torcs he discovered with a metal detector in 2009, were last year's most valuable treasure reported to the Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer, bringing the finder a reward of £462,000. (photo)

Investor wanted for £2m Hadrian's Wall project

Hadrian's Wall Heritage is hoping to attract an investor with the funds to construct a new visitor center at the Bowness House Farm in Bowness-on-Solway, England, the eastern end of the 84-mile (135km) Hadrian's Wall trail.

Common soldier "willing to die" at Bosworth field

A 15th century will from the Norfolk Record Office, one of few records of common soldiers, was left by Thomas Longe who was "willing to die" for King Richard III at Bosworth Field.

The sounds of Stonehenge

Visitors to Stonehenge never have the opportunity to experience the monument the way their early ancestors would have, but now BBC accoustic engineers have re-created the sound of a ritual held 4,000 years ago.

Druid pleads for "founding fathers" of Stonehenge

In 2008, the remains of 40 bodies, thought to be at least 5,000 years old, were removed from Stonehenge for scientific study. Recently, in court, a Druid named King Arthur Pendragon pleaded to ''Let those we lay to rest, stay in rest."

Historical re-enactments mark anniversary of the sacking of Canterbury

A number of events in the modern world mark the anniversary of the invasion and sacking of Canterbury, England by Viking raiders in September 1011.

"Wonderful" medieval walls found near Llanrwst, Wales

Drainage work at a hotel near Llanrwst, Wales has unearthed three 13th century walls believed to have belonged to the cloister of a Cistercian abbey.

Poland's weekend warriors

A popular entertainment at Malbork Castle in Poland is medieval armored combat. BBC Warsaw correspondent Adam Easton attends an event and talks to spectators. Malbork is Europe's largest medieval castle. (video)

New Welsh Pilgrim's Way inaugurated by 127 mile walk

The new Pilgrim's Way walking path in Wales was christened recently when 80 walkers began the 127-mile (204km), 12-day trek from Basingwerk Abbey in Holywell, Flintshire to Bardsey Island in Gwynedd. (slideshow)

London plans international Shakespeare festival for 2012

Beginning on April 23, 2012, a multilingual Shakespeare festival will celebrate culture in parallel with the London Summer Olympics. Professional and amateur companies will present the Bard's plays in dozens of languages and hundreds of productions.

Saxon logboat on display in Portsmouth

Visitors to the Portsmouth City Museum will be able to view the remains of a 6th century Saxon logboat found in Langstone Harbour in 2003. (photo)

Medieval Mayhem at Scotland's Caerlaverock Castle

The walls of Caerlaverock Castle near Dumfries, Scotland rang with the sound of sword on shield recently when Historic Scotland presented Medieval Mayhem. A slideshow of photos by Gareth Easton is available from the BBC.

Reivers ride for charity

During the Middle Ages, the Border Reivers rode the lands between England and Scotland, stealing livestock and wreaking havoc with ruthless abandon. Now, their modern versions are riding to raise money for wounded British soldiers.

Hikers bewitched by Bath

The folks at Lonely Planet feel that the best way to appreciate the old Roman and Regency city of Bath, England is from above, as in the 10km Skyline Walk which traverses the hills that surround the city.

Oxford crucifixion painting may be a true masterpiece

When a painting of the Crucifixion was purchased for Campion Hall at the University of Oxford in the 1930s, the buyers never dreamed they had a true Renaissance masterpiece painted by Michelangelo himself. (photo)

Revamped Oystermouth Castle welcomes visitors

For the first time in over a hundred years, visitors are welcome to visit Oystermouth Castle in Swansea, Wales. The castle received a UK£1M facelift including a 30ft (10m) high glass bridge. (photo)

Graham Ryder discusses the firearms of Henry VIII

In a short BBC video, Graham Ryder from the Royal Armouries in Leeds discusses Henry VIII's fascination with and promotion of firearms.

Portrait of Elizabeth of York revealed

Duncan Leslie of Hever Castle explains about the importance of Elizabeth of York, the mother of Henry VIII, in a short BBC video. A 16th century portrait of the queen has been recently revealed.