BBC News

British Broadcasting Corporation

Volunteers excavate Sherwood Forest

According to legend, Robin Hood married Maid Marian in Edwinstowe, a village near the Major Oak, the legendary shelter for the outlaw and his band of Merry Men. Now volunteers are helping to excavate the area looking for Sherwood Forest's medieval past.

Was the Black Prince really so evil?

British school children all know about the evil Black Prince Edward of Woodstock, who put to death 3,000 innocents after the siege of the French town of Limoges in September 1370. But the discovery of a letter written by Edward may change his image forever.

Medieval linen found in Northampton tanning tanks

Several scraps of linen dating to the Middle Ages have been found at the base of a timber and stone-lined tanks, believed to have been used for tanning, in the St John's Street excavation in Northampton, England. (photos)

Jousting at Linlithgow Palace

Linlithgow Palace, the birthplace of Mary, Queen of Scots, was the site of the recent jousting tournament staged in front of the castle. A BBC News In Pictures articles offers "stunning" photos of the action. (photos)

A new England - "all very much Game of Thrones"

In a recent article for BBC Magazine, sociologist, writer and performer Tom Shakespeare ponders what would happen if Scotland were to achieve its independence and the England left behind broke up into its original seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms.

English extend funds for 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta

2015 will be a big year for Magna Carta enthusiasts, marking the 800th anniversary of the document. Recently ten organizations were awarded funds to help with commemorations of the event.

Protecting Ashby St Ledgers

Tiny, deserted, medieval villages across the English landscape have been disappearing, moving English Heritage to recommend historical designation to preserve what is left. Now the government of Northamptonshire is taking action by proclaiming such villages "scheduled monuments."

Conservation plan for Battle of Northampton site approved

"This year we are celebrating the rich and interesting story of Northampton and our nation. So it seems only fitting that we are looking carefully at how we can protect the site of one of the most significant battles fought on English soil," said Tim Hadland of the Northampton Borough Council about plans to preserve the Battle of Northampton site.

Medieval fighting breaks out in Spain

BBC Magazine reporter Tom Holland was prepared to be disappointed when he attended the recent First International Medieval Combat Federation World Championships at Belmonte Castle in Spain. After all he'd been to re-enactments before, but he quickly changed his mind.

Treasures of Scotland revealed

2013 was a "magnificent" year for archaeologists in Scotland. The recent annual Scottish Treasure Trove report, covering 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014, by Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer (QLTR) Catherine Dyer shows a variety of items including gold jewelry, coins and a Roman wine dipper. (photos)

Rare Ethelbert penny found in Sussex field

King Ethelbert II was murdered, possibly for minting his own coins. Now an extremely-rare, 8th century silver penny, found by metal detectorist Darrin Simpson, has been discovered in a Sussex, England field. (photo)

Vindolanda Nero coin "a special find"

Archaeologists working at Vindolanda, the Roman fort in northeastern England, made a "special" find recently: a rare gold coin bearing the image of Roman emperor Nero, the first gold coin found during the excavation's 40-year history. (photo)

"Holy Grail" stolen in Wales

The Nanteos Cup is missing. Rumored to be the Holy Grail, brought to Britain by Joseph of Arimathea, the olive wood cup is normally kept in a bank vault in Wales, but was loaned to an ailing women in Weston-Under-Penyard. It was stolen from her home July 14, 2014. (photo)

Newstead Abbey to receive grant from World Monuments Fund

In 1540, the Byron family, ancestors of the famous Lord Byron, was given Newstead Abbey near Nottingham, England. Built in the 12th century, the abbey has since fallen into disrepair, and it has become the recipient of UK£40,000 from the World Monuments Fund to save the crumbling structure.

Oldest copy of "The Brus" restored

The oldest known copy of "The Brus," an epic poem describing the Battle of Bannockburn, has been restored in time for the 700th celebration of the event. The poem was written in 1375 by the Archdeacon of Aberdeen. (photos)

Viking sword has colorful history

Auctioneers at Christie's have announced that they will offer for auction a double-edged Viking sword associated with the battles of Hastings, Stamford Bridge and Bannockburn. The sword is expected to bring between UK£80,000 to £120,000. (photo)

Securing the precious Magna Carta

Chris Woods, director of the  British National Conservation Service, has a daunting task: to assure the safety of the precious Lincoln Magna Carta during its tour through the United States in 2014.

Scottish burial may be 10th century King of Dublin

In 2005, archaeologists unearthed the remains of a person of importance near Auldhame in East Lothian, Scotland. Now experts believe that the burial might be that of the 10th Century Irish Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson, who led raids in the area and reigned as King of Dublin and Northumbria.

Richard III: An Overview

The verdict is finally in: the remains of Richard III, England's last medieval king, will be laid to rest, with great pomp and circumstance, in Leicester Cathedral after judges put an end to requests that he be buried in York. The BBC's Greig Watson has an overview of the Richard saga. (photos)

Norfolk "Q-tip" declared treasure

Everyday toilet implements, such as an ear scoop found by a metal detectorist, were among the recently-declared treasures in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England. Also discussed was an early Anglo-Saxon "gold and garnet cloisonné circular domed object." (photos)

Cabbage Hurling goes global

Prepare yourslef for the newest global sensation: Cabbage Hurling. Nothing like America's Punkin' Chunkin', Cabbage Hurling consists of a smallish trebuchet and lots of rotten cabbage. Simon Spark reports for the BBC. (video)

Hengwrt Chaucer online

The earliest known manuscript of Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, housed at the National Library of Wales in Aberystwyth, has been digitized and is now available online. (photo)

The potency of Shakespeare's potions

It's Shakespeare's 450th birthday. In a feature article for the BBC's Future, Claudia Hammond looks at whether the poisons mentioned in William Shakespeare's plays, such as Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet and A Midsummer Night's Dream, could actually work.

"Only individual ever recorded related to the Norman invasion" found in East Sussex

Skeleton 180 might be a very remarkable individual: the only person recorded related to the Norman invasion of England. Buried in a medieval cemetery, 180 was believed to have died at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, but scientists have now placed his death around 1066.

Storks return to Thrigby Hall

In the Middle Ages, it was common to see white storks, which breed in continental Europe and migrate to Africa in the winter, nesting in the chimneys of England, but no stork has done so for 600 years - until now. (photo, video)

Hunting with the eagles of Mongolia

In a wonderful article by William Kremer, of BBC World Service, photographer Asher Svidensky looks at some of the young people of Mongolia as they hunt using golden eagles, including 13-year-old Ashol-Pan, considered to be the country's only apprentice huntress. (photos)

"Incredibly significant" bishop's seal declared treasure

Metal detector enthusiast Andy Falconer has found a few artifacts over the years but nothing like the 14th century, silver bishop's seal, called "incredibly significant" by Manx National Heritage, he found recently in a field on the Isle of Man. (photo)

But really, Puddledub?

Chief researcher for a new study of Scottish place names, Dr Simon Taylor, says: "Scotland is a country where many different languages have been spoken over the last 1,500 years, and its place names reflect this rich and varied history. What we are doing is giving teachers the tools to explore Scotland's rich heritage."

Offa's Dyke may be misnamed

Offa's Dyke, a linear earthwork stretching 177 miles (285 km) in Chirk near the Shropshire border, may be misnamed. Legendarily built by King Offa of Mercia during his reign between 757 and 796, the earthwork may actually be 200 years older.

Bannockburn comes to the BBC

The BBC celebrates the anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn with a two-program event, which premiered early in June 2014, entitled The Quest For Bannockburn. The program features Neil Oliver and Tony Pollard.