Associated Press

Associated Press International

Knights of Malta celebrate their 100th birthday at the Vatican

February 9, 2013, marked the 900th birthday of the founding of the Knights of Malta, a Roman Catholic religious order noted for its charitable works. The group celebrated its birthday with a parade around St. Peter's Square and a visit with Pope Benedict XVI, who is himself a member of the Knights.

First church in Peru found

Peruvian and Spanish archaeologists recently used historical documents from an archive in Spain to help locate the site of Peru's oldest Roman Catholic church near Piura on the country's northern coast. The church was built in 1534.

"Fairy tale find" in Austria

"Fairy tales still exist! Private individual finds sensational treasure in garden," read an annoucement from Austria's Federal Office for Memorials about the discovery of over 200 pieces of medieval jewelry. (photos)

Rarely-seen 9th century carpet mosaic displayed briefly in Jericho

In honor of the 10,000th birthday of the city of Jericho, officials gave visitors a rare glimpse of a 1,200-year-old carpet mosaic measuring nearly 900 square meters (9,700 square feet) which once graced the floor of the main bath house of an Islamic palace. (photo)

New theatre to stand on site of London's first

A new hall will host performances on the same ground where Shakespeare's plays were first acted. The predecessor to the Globe, known simply as "The Theatre," stood on London's South Bank. Its site was bought by an amateur theatrical group and has been under excavation since 2008. 

"Song of the Sea" pages reunited in Jerusalem

Two fragments of a 7th century biblical manuscript of the Song of the Sea, a triumphant hymn to the destruction of the Egyptian Army and the freeing of the Israelites, have been reunited for an exhibit at Israel's national museum.

Byzantine Wine Press found in Israel

Archaeologists working near Tel Aviv, Israel have found a wine press whose size and advanced design are exceptional for its period.

Medieval shipwreck found in Baltic Sea

Twelve shipwrecks, including some that may date back as far as 800 years, have been found by a gas company building an underwater pipeline in the Baltic Sea.

Archaeologists may have found Princess Eadgyth's body

If tests support their suspicions, experts from Bristol University have identified the oldest remains of an English royal. She was Eadgyth (pronounced "Edith"), sister to Athelstan, effectively the first king of all of England, who won a decisive battle circa 937 against the Scots and Irish.

Viking shield found in Denmark

Archaeologists working on a Viking site 62 miles west of Copenhagen have discovered a 10th century shield. The wooden artifact is said to be well-preserved. (photo)

A Muromachi period Tale of Genji manuscript found in Tokyo

The discovery of a rare full set of chapters of the 11th century The Tale of Genji, believed to be the world's oldest novel, has been found in a private collection in Tokyo.

Gary Gygax, "Father of D&D", dies at age 69

For many in the SCA and other Middle Ages living history organizations, the first introduction to acting the part of someone from a medieval culture was a game of Dungeons and Dragons (D&D). Gary Gygax, one of the co-creators of D&D more than 30 years ago, died today after several years of declining health.

Vatican publishes documents from Knights Templar heresy trials

The Vatican is finally publishing Processus Contra Templarios, the report from the heresy trials of the Knights Templar that was lost in the Vatican secret archives for 700 years due to a filing error.

3,000 year old beehives found in the Middle East

Archaeologists excavating the ruins of the city of Rehov, in northern Israel, have found thirty intact beehives and other apicultural artifacts dating to approximately 900 B.C.E.

12th century Buddha paintings found

A Nepalese shepherd led researchers to a cave where he had found cave-paintings of Buddha, including a 55-panel mural depicting the life of Buddha, dating back to at least the 12th century.

SCA family sues over banned yearbook photo

The mother of the high school senior whose yearbook banned his photo in SCA armor and sword has sued on her son's behalf. The Rhode Island ACLU is supporting the suit, which seeks to prevent the publication of the yearbook without the picture.

Palatine Hill excavation in Rome yields artifacts from deposed Emperor

The Emperor Maxentius was defeated by Constantine I in a battle in the year 321 C.E., but his followers apparently concealed his scepter, ceremonial weapons, and other regalia from Constantine's forces by burying the items. Archaeologists excavating Palatine Hill in Rome have located the cache, which is notable for the condition of the objects.

Shire of New Exeter demonstrates rebated steel combat

The Adrian Empire's Shire of New Exeter, in modern-day Jefferson City, Missouri, was the site of a live-steel combat demonstration that attracted the attention of Michelle Brooks, a reporter for the Jefferson City News Tribune.

Domesday Book now Online

The Domesday Book, a handwritten recording of lands and properties under William the Conqueror, is on display and also available on the internet.

Byzantine Port Found

"Like Romans, Athenians and other residents of the world's great historic cities, the residents of Istanbul can hardly put a shovel in the ground without digging up something important." Archaelogists working on the site of a new subway station believe they have found a port from Byzantine times.

"Unforgettable I Do's" Include SCAdian Wedding

Sarika Jagtiani of the Associated Press looks at themed weddings including that of one couple, Diana Stoughton and Andrew Hazen, who met at the Pennsic War and married at AEthelmearc War Practice.

Backhoe Operator Finds Ancient Text

As reported in the Cleveland Plain Dealer, 26 July 2006: Irish archaeologists on Tuesday heralded the discovery of an ancient book of psalms, found by a construction worker who spotted something while driving the shovel of his backhoe into a bog.

6th Century Pyramid Found under Mexican Passion Play Site

As many as a million Mexicans have watched an annual reenactment of the crucifixion of Christ unaware that a pyramid of the Teotihuacan culture lay under the soil on which they stood.

Naval Construction Site Yields 16th Century Shipwreck

The Associated Press reports that a construction crew working at Pensacola's Naval Air Station in Florida has discovered a 16th century Spanish ship buried in the sand.

Pennsylvania Game Commission Upholds Ban on Atlatl

The state Game Commission of Pennsylvania has recommended that hunters not be allowed to use atlatls to kill deer.

James Doohan dies at age 85

If they had had transporter beams and warp drives in the Middle Ages, they would have used them. And James Doohan would have been the Scotsman who squeezed 'em for every last drop of performance and then some. The man they called "Scotty" has left us today.

Gladiator Games Attract Tourists in Jordan

Dale Gavlak of the Associated Press reports on gladiator games which are being held in the Roman ruins of Jerash, Jordan. The games will feature chariot racing and gladiatorial combat that are sure crowd pleasers.

NEPA News: SCA members look forward to the past

Members of the shires of Silver Rylle and Owl's Reste in Pennsylvania gathered for an event recently, and Linda Espenshade was on hand to chronicle day's battles and to interview SCAdians about their hobby.

2nd Century Roman Barge Discovered in Rhine

A well-preserved Roman barge has been discovered at the bottom of the Rhine River in the Netherlands. The vessel is the oldest of its type ever discovered in the country.

Ireland Okays Highway Near Hill of Tara

Overruling the protests of environmentalists and historians, the Irish government has approved construction of a highway that passing near the Hill of Tara, a popular meeting point for Irish kings and chieftains from pre-Christian times until the 11th century.