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Odescalchi Castle has Rich History

Odescalchi Castle, the site of the November 18, 2006 nuptials of Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, is a 15th century residence with a great deal of history including the family of Pope Innocent XI and a murderous noblewoman.

Roman Coins Offered to Placate the Gods?

Archaeologists working near the city of Cuijk in the Netherlands have discovered a cache of 3rd century Roman coins and other treasures, apparently as an offering at the spot where a bolt of lightning had struck.

Viking Era Coins found on Isle of Gotland

On the Swedish Isle of Gotland, Edvin and Arvid Sandborg were helping a neighbor with his garden when they began to dig up old coins, one of them a 1,100 year-old arabic coin.

"Print Clock" Technique May Change Dating Methods

Blair Hedges, a biology professor at Penn State, has discovered a new method to date printed materials. The "print clock" technique uses statistical formulas to analyze fades and page breaks.

Mona Lisa is 500... Maybe

She doesn't look a day over 300. Art historians have long believed that Leonardo Da Vinci's famous work was painted in 1506, but that may just be a guess.

Eight New British Knights Installed in 12th Century Ceremony

England is known for its long-standing traditions, and the installation ceremony for the Order of the Bath is no exception. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth recently oversaw the latest elevation when eight men from the British military and intelligence services were installed.

British Heralds Find Place in Modern World

Police in Middlesbrough, England have recruited heralds to accompany them on rounds to act as town criers. The heralds use their trained voices to warn citizens to lock their doors.

Beer on Tap

A woman in Oslo, Norway was shocked recently to find beer streaming from her kitchen water faucet.

Columbus mystery nearly solved 500 yrs after death

Debate about origins and final resting place of Columbus has raged for over a century, with historians questioning the traditional theory that he hails from Genoa, Italy. Some say he was a Spanish Jew, a Greek, a Basque or Portuguese.

Remains of Joan of Arc to be Tested

A team of French scientists hopes that a series of tests will determine if remains discovered near Garches, France are those of 15th century heroine Joan of Arc.

"Spamalot" to Begin North American Tour

The musical hit "Spamalot" is scheduled to tour beginning with Boston in March. The show is based on "Monty Python and the Holy Grail."

Beowulf Mania

Two films, an opera and an off-Broadway play are enough to jump start the popularity of Anglo-Saxon classic.

Beowulf as a Modern Rock Opera?

A musical version of the epic poem? The Irish Repertory Theatre is putting on this amibitious version from October 16 through November 13, 2005, at the Rep's Theatre in New York City.

MIT & MythBusters Take on Archimedes' "Death Ray"

After the failure of Jamie and Adam to reconstruct a working model of Archimedes' death ray for Mythbusters, scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have taken up the challenge.

Need practice in Welsh language? Try playing Scrabble™

So, how many points is "Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyllllantysiliogogogoch" worth, anyway? The Welsh language, native tongue of half a million people, now has its own version of the popular Scrabble™ board game.

12th Century Chinese Painting Costs $247,000 to Display

Engineers from Beijing University were called upon to construct a special display case for one of China's most famous paintings: a 16+-foot-long silk masterpiece dating to the 12th century.

Viking ship built with 15 million ice cream sticks

Robert McDonald, former Hollywood stuntman, has built a replica of a Viking longship from 15 million ice cream sticks.

French Magazine Claims Turin Shroud a Fake

In its July 2005 issue, Science et Vie explains how an artist used medieval techiques to recreate the image on the cloth.

Michaelangelo's Anatomy Lesson

Two Brazilian doctors who are also art lovers think they have uncovered a "secret lesson" in human anatomy in the famous Sistine Chapel frescos.

Roman/Celtic Coins Found in Netherlands

Archaeologists working on a dig in the Netherlands have discovered 17 ancient Celtic coins. The coins were the first such discovered in the country.

"Da Vinci Code" Banned from Westminster Abbey

Producers of the film version of Dan Brown's bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code have hit another roadblock. Officials of London's Westminster Abbey have refused to allow the production crew to film there.

Third Century Fort Discovered in China

An ancient Chinese fort from the Kingdom of Wei has been discovered by archaeologists in China's eastern Anhui province.

Roman rabbit dinner may pinpoint introduction of rabbits to England

The 2000-year-old remains of a butchered rabbit, thought to have been the dinner of a Roman, have led scholars to believe that rabbits were introduced to Britain following the Roman invasion in the year 43 AD.

Wallace's Sword Travels to New York

A double-handed sword used by Scottish hero William Wallace left Scotland for New York, where it was the centerpiece of an exhibit at New York's Grand Central Station.

Spamalot Debuts to Rave Reviews

The new musical, based on Monty Python and the Holy Grail, has finally debuted on Broadway, to rave reviews.

Black Plague has Effect on HIV

A recent medical study by researchers at the University of Liverpool concludes that the Black Plague of the Middle Ages may have increased modern Europeans' resistance to HIV.

Vienna exhibit features working models of Da Vinci's inventions

The Vienna Art Centre offers a new Leonardo da Vinci exhibit featuring 62 working models (some full-scale and some miniature) of his mechanical inventions.

Archaeologist Killed on Site of Roman Dig

An Austrian archaeologist was killed when the pit he was excavating collapsed.

Prehistoric Scots Tied to Middle East

A new book and television series claim that 20% of Scots have blood ties to Iraq stemming from a migration in 4000 BCE.

Iran "Cradle of Board Games"

Iranian archaeologists have discovered a 5,000-year-old backgammon set, thought to be the world's oldest, making the country the "cradle of board games."