Agriculture

Farming and gardening, animal husbandry, forestry

Over 1,000 Horses Gather in Iceland

Over 1,000 horses and their owners have gathered in Reykjavik, Iceland to take part in the largest-ever Landsmót, or Icelandair Horse Festival, itself the largest gathering of Icelandair horses in the world.

Rare Exmoor ponies to help save dwindling peat bog

Ponies from an endangered breed, descended from the original British "hill ponies," are being brought into a nature preserve on the Solway Plain in England, to graze away grasses that threaten one of the area's few remaining peat bogs.

Fiber Arts Festival in Israel

description:
"Chag HaGez" in Maale Levona*
Monday, June 26, 2006
30 Sivan 5766

Starting at 16:00

Program:

  • Sheep Shearing
  • Spinning
  • Weaving
  • Dying
  • Children's Activities
  • Pony Rides
  • Refreshments for sale
  • Arts and Crafts for sale

Special concert by Shlomo Shavit

A bus will be leaving from Jerusalem at 15:00 (fee for the bus and happening is 20NIS p/p or 100 NIS per family) Location:
Maale Levona, Israel

Rare Dyes in Kabul Bazaar

Nathan Santamaria, a reporter for National Public Radio, reports on his search for rare natural dyes in a Kabul, Afghanistan market. Listen to the All Things Considered report and view photos online.

Monks Began English Gardening Tradition

Monasteries were a stronghold of medieval gardening in Europe. The manual labor of gardening taught humility and thus benefited the monks' souls, while the herbs and vegetables they grew aided their health.

New Housing Project Built on Site of Medieval Village

The site of a new town in Grafenwöhr, Germany, for U.S. soldiers and their families, was once a medieval village and later boasted a guest house where tourists came to watch the Bavarian army train on a nearby range.

Smell of the Middle Ages

On its website, Trivium Publishing offers suggestions for enjoying the medieval experience by using your sense of smell through an article entitled Smell of the Middle Ages by Jacquelyn Hodson.

Black Plague Caused Climate Change

A new study suggests that the devastating Black Death may have done more than wipe out 1/3 of the population. It may have triggered Europe's "Little Ice Age" in the 14th century.

Medieval Garden Open House

On June 17, 2006, the Department of Horticulture and the Center for Medieval Studies at Penn State University will host an Open House. The public is invited to attend from 2:00-4:30 pm.

Tudor Bananas

Are bananas period? Apparently so, according to the recent discovery of a 500-year-old banana skin in London. The development shatters previously-held beliefs that the banana first came to Britain in 1633.

Neolithic Dairy Farming

The discovery of cheese and yogurt in 8,000-year-old pots proves to researchers that neolithic Europeans practiced dairy farming. The pots were found during separate studies in Romania, Hungary and Switzerland.

As We Sow: Medieval Gardens

Dame Aoife has been a busy lady with holidays and her modern-world job, but this week she's back with a pre-springtime Links edition devoted to medieval gardens.

Farmer Restoring Ancient Woodlands Unearths Pits Dating to 1350 A.D.

As Britain celebrates the 30th anniversary of National Tree Week, one Cumbrian farmer is making a valuable contribution to the regeneration of the county's woodland - and uncovering some fascinating facts about the region's industrial heritage into the process, as well as pits dating back to 1350 A.D.

Delaware farm tourist experiences range from Wild West to medieval Europe

The News Journal describes several examples of "agritourism" in the state of Delaware, including Baronage Farm in Townsend.

Green Haven Soaps

Indulge in handcrafted artisan soaps for thy bath, from peasant to royalty and everyone in between. Here you will find soaps made using a combination of ancient wisdom and modern standards of purity. Let the village wise woman at Green Haven bring you earthen creations for body and soul.

Origin of White British Cattle Still a Mystery

A rare and mysterious breed of white British cattle has been traced to the Bronze Age where there were an important part of pre-Roman pagan rituals, but how the cattle came to Britain is still a mystery.

Horses, Hounds and Hawks: An SCA Animal Arts Collegium

Did you ever wonder what goes in to the upkeep and training of a horse? Do want to learn how-tos of hound coursing? Maybe falconry fascinates you and you've always wanted to see one hunt on the wing. These and other topics along with hands-on-demonstrations will be yours when you come to the first annual Horse, Hounds and Hawks Collegium to be held in the Shire of Stormsport on October 29-30, 2005.

17th Century Farm Offers Tips for Modern Life

A year-long project by five experts has uncovered what life was like on a Welsh farm in the year 1620. The article by Megan Lane is part of the BBC series Tales from the Green Valley.

"The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened"

Project Gutenberg has released The Closet of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened by Kenelm Digby in electronic format.

Anglo-Saxon Burial Site Discovered Near London

Archeologists have discovered the remains of an Anglo-Saxon settlement on Coulsdon's Farthing Downs near London, England.

"Italy's Most Beautiful Garden" to be Restored

The Gardens of Ninfa, once thought to be one of the most beautiful in Italy, are being restored, thanks to the efforts of three generations of women.

Iron Age Farm Discovered in England

Archaeologists have discovered an Iron Age settlement on farmaland near the English city of Cheltenham.

Date palm buds after 2,000 years

Israeli researchers say they have succeeded in growing a date palm from a 2,000-year-old seed.

600 Year Old Monks Garden Replanted

English Heritage workers have replanted a garden at Mount Grace Priory, near Northallerton.

Thatching Preserves Historic Grain Crops

An article in British Archaeology Magazine reports that medieval cereal crops have been discovered in thatched roofs in southern England.

National Herb Garden Celebrates 25th Anniversary

The National Herb Garden in Washington, D.C. kicked off a six-month long celebration of its 25th anniversary May 21, 2005.

Gleann Abhann Crown Tourney Site has "No Pet" Policy

Gwyneth, Autocrat for Gleann Abhann's Crown List, has announced that attendees will not be allowed to bring animals to the site.

"Seed Savers Exchange" Vows to Preserve Heirloom Plants

An article in the Lawrence Journal-World looks at Kent Whealy and the Seed Savers Exchange, a network of argriculturalists whose mission is to preserve the diversity of plants.

German club in Pittsburgh recreates authentic Schlachtfest

Marlene Parrish, reporting for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, describes how the 150-year-old Teutonia Mannerchor club performs an authentic Schlachtfest (Slaughter Festival) on the north side of Pittsburgh.

Alnwick Castle's Poison Garden

The Duchess of Northumberland has a black thumb, at least when it comes to her celebrated poison garden.