Performing Arts

Music, storytelling, juggling, theatre, and similar artistic endeavors.

Experience the viola organista

Leonardo Da Vinci had more projects than time, a fact illustrated by his notesbooks of inventions never built, but Polish pianist Slawomir Zubrzycki recently took on one challenging by constructing da Vinci's viola organista, an instrument which combines "the bowed sound of a viola (or cello) with a cabinet that resembles a baby grand piano." (video)

Reno erat Rudolphus

A mite late, perhaps, but still of note, we bring you a special Christmas present: Reno erat Rudolphus, complete with score so you can sing along.

Estrella War Promotions A&S Edition

Estrella War XXX Invites gentle lords and ladies to Teach at our A&S Collegium!

New Shakespeare collection to include "Apocrypha"

Have you heard of Shakespeare's Mucedorus? Neither have most people, since the late 16th century play has been attributed to someone else. But now, thanks to linguistic "fingerprinting," Shakespeare's involvement in the writing of the play may have been proven.

Pirates and performers join SCAdians for North Carolina medieval festival

Members of several SCA groups joined musicians and actors for Pamlico Community College's recent Medieval and Renaissance Festival which took place in Grantsboro, North Carolina. Bill Hand of the Sun Journal spoke with several participants about re-enacting. (photo)

Shakespeare: Women in tights

From Sarah Bernhardt to Helen Mirren, women have longed from - and won - the meaty male parts in Shakespeare's plays. New York Times columnist Alexis Soloski looks at women playing Shakespearean heroes in a recent article.

Modern monk accepts tonsure for charity

Re-enacting Ancient Times Society member Matthew Routledge, of March, England, has played Friar Tuck before, but this time he is serious. Routledge is taking on the part of the monk to raise money for the Stroke Association. Elaine King of the Standard 24 has the story.

Heather Dale takes Texas

Canadian folk singer and songwriter Heather Dale lives a long way from Texas, but she traveled south recently to perform at Copperas Cove Public Library. Cove Herald reporter Erik Papke spoke with Heather's fans who gathered for the performance.

"Hadrada’s Last Stand" added to CalonSound Project

Johann Steinarsson sings his song Hadrada’s Last Stand as the latest entry in the CalonSound Project.

Aspendos Gladiator School closing in Turkey

There will be unemployed gladiators pounding the streets of Antalya, Turkey after the closing of the Aspendos Gladiator School, where modern-day gladiators entertained tourists. The company cited "a poor tourism season" as the reason for the closing.

Rethinking Henry VIII

For 500 years, Henry VIII has had a reputation as a womanizing villain, but TV historian Dr Lucy Worsley has a different view: Henry was a family kind of guy who just wanted to settle down with a good woman.

Connecticut faire-goers risk "excessive jubilation"

Visitors to the Connecticut Renaissance Faire, in Norwich, have the chance to chat with King Henry VIII, but also risk getting slapped with a ticket from the faire's sherrif for "excessive jubilation." The faire runs through October 20, 2013.

Re-living history at the Michiana Renaissance Festival

Kamm Island Park in Mishawaka, Indiana became the "Kingdom of Kamm" recently when the Michiana Renaissance Festival came to town. Tricia Harte of WNDU - Channel 16 - in South Bend hosts three videos on the Faire.

The sad life of Elizabethan child actors

Elizabethan theater life may have been booming for playwrights such as Shakespeare, but it was not so rosy for children in theatrical troupes. University of Oxford professor, Dr Bart van Es, discovered evidence of systemic child abuse while researching his book, Shakespeare in Company.

Branagh to bring Macbeth to New York stage

Sir Kenneth Branagh will bring his version of "the Scottish play" by William Shakespeare to the drill hall of the Park Avenue Armory in New York City in June 2014. Sir Kenneth said: "I am delighted that we have the chance to recreate Macbeth in this epic setting."

Known World's Got Talent!

You know that the SCA Known World is alive with talent. Now the Society is giving us the chance to prove it with just a short YouTube video.

Renaissance satire takes on Scottish independence

The Satire of the Three Estates by Sir David Lyndsay is considered Scotland's only surviving Renaissance play. Now the six-hour-long political satire is being performed at Linlithgow Palace in West Lothian. (video)

Tin whistles and ferrets in the SCA

Wendy Furie is a veterinarian - and a Scottish bard. While the two professions might sound at odds with each other, she makes them work, in the modern world and as Swannoc Beag, a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism. Laura Blasey of the Frederick (Maryland) News-Post has the story.

Shava's WW photos and new video online

Viscountess Elashava bas Riva reports that she has posted photo and video from Double Wars, which too place recently in the Kingdom of Northshield. The photos are available on Flickr, while the video can be found on YouTube.

Pennsic 42 photos on Northshield Gallery

Jean Quinn-Davis, of the Kingdom of Northshield, reports that she has posted an album of photos from Pennsic XLII. The photos are available on the Northshield Gallery.

The wonders of the Bristol Renaissance Faire

For twelve summers, residents of the state of Wisconsin have been entertained by the comedy, music and medieval skills of performers at the Bristol Renaissance Faire. Mrinal Gokhale of the Milwaukee Express has the story.

The impact of Shakespeare's investment

In 1594, William Shakespeare made a move that gave him financial stability and, some say, changed the way he wrote plays: he purchased a one-eighth share in the Lord Chamberlain's Men. One of those people is Dr Bart van Es of Oxford University's Faculty of English Language and Literature, who claims that the purchase gave the playwright a better relationship with and understanding of actors.

Life of Elizabeth Woodville dramatized on BBC One

Best-selling historical novelist Philippa Gregory has inspired a new series, currrently running on BBC One, which tells the stories of Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville. The White Queen is based on Gregory's series The Cousin’s War.

"Bards welcome"

How do bards know when a private camp at the upcoming Pennsic War is welcoming to entertainers? Pelayo of the Kingdom of Ealdormere has the answer.

Known World Bardic Congress and Cooks Collegium VII

  • 29 August 2014 at 17:00 until 1 September 2014 at 12:00
  • Camp Wawbeek 1450 Highway 13 Wisconsin Dells WI 53965

Hosted by the Barony of Jararvellir (Madison, WI) in the Kingdom of Northshield (Wisconsin, U.P., Minnesota, western Ontario, North & South Dakota, Manitoba).

Ealdormere songbook online

Justinian Clarus of the Kingdom of Ealdormere, reports that his songbook, Cry of the Wolf VI, a completely prejudiced compilation of this Bard's and Their Majesties favourite songs, is available, is available online. The book is subtitled Marching to War with Trumbrand and Kaylah.

The CalonSound Project presents new works from Johann Steinarsson

Three new recordings from Johann Steinarsson are now up at The CalonSound Project.

Be Entertained at Pennsic

Lady Lorelei Skye, Dean of the Performing Arts College at Pennsic, has released the final schedule for the Pennsic Performing Arts Tent and Ampitheater – and invites you to enjoy the many new and returning performers.

Whacks and wenches at Three Barons Renaissance Faire

Members of the Society for Creative Anachronism were on hand in early June for the 21st annual Three Barons Renaissance Fair in Anchorage, Alaska. Bill Roth of the Anchorage Daily News offers a photo album with highlights.

Tribute to Chiara la Trombottiera

Hirsch von Henford of the West Kingdom's Golden Stag Players, has created a short video in tribute to Chiara la Trombottiera, who passed away May 30, 2013 of cancer.