Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

Grant awarded to preserve 15th century "deadly sins" paintings

The devil is in St Cadoc's church in Llancarfan, Wales, and officials from the Heritage Lottery Fund have decided to award the church UK£500,000 to keep him there. (photos)

Mona Lisa Has a Twin

The Prado Museum in Madrid recently announced that it has what is thought to be the earliest copy of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”.

"The Mourners" at Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is currently hosting the exhibition The Mourners: Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy, one of the masterpieces of late medieval sculpture in Europe. The exhibit will run January 21, 2012 through April 15, 2012.

Medieval mystery writer researches by doing

Writer Jeri Westerson of Menifee, California loves the Middle Ages, particularly the world of Crispin Guest, her "ex-knight turned detective on the mean streets of fourteenth century London." Scott Butki, of the Seattle P-I has an interview.

Rappin' to Chaucer with Baba Brinkman

Canadian Baba Brinkman is a performer - and a scholar of medieval literature. He combined both in a recent one-man show, The Canterbury Tales Remixed, which set the Chaucer’s 14th-century work to original hip-hop songs. Catherine Rampell of the New York Times, has a review.

“Ornament of the World” depicted in video on Moorish Spain

A medieval German traveler once described Granada, in Moorish Spain, as the “Ornament of the World.” A video posted on the Moroccan Design website showcases the beauty and enlightment of the region.

The glorious Sistine Chapel

Long to travel to Italy to study its Renaissance Art, but can't afford the travel expenses? Take a trip to the Vatican and see the wonders of the Sistine Chapel - virtually.

[LOC] Valentine's in Antioch

Valentine's in Antioch, sponsored by Willoughby Vale. February 11, 2012.

1,000 years of British history on church walls

The history and art of Great Britain can be traced by the paintings on its church walls. Now interested parties may not have to travel to review the country's glorious wallpaintings, but can study them online thanks to the efforts of the Churches Conservation Trust.

The production and circulation of 15th century songs and carols

In her PhD dissertation for University College London, Kathleen Rose Palti looks at 15th century song lyrics, how they were used and circulated, and women's roles in the production of the songs.

The magnificent masks of Bluemoon Venice

The festival season in the SCA means masked balls. For inspiration, dancers may want to visit the commercial Italian site Bluemoon Venice, for inspiration in creating simply gorgeous masks.

Italian officials concerned about effect on pollution on The Last Supper

Milan, Italy is one of Western Europe's most polluted city, and art historians fear for the survival of Leonard daVinci's Last Supper located on a wall of the refectory of Santa Maria Delle Grazie Church.

Vatican publication claims Shakespeare was Catholic

The new film Anonymous, which debates the authorship of Shakespeare's plays, has opened a new controversary: the playwright's religion. L'Osservatore Romano reports that references in several plays prove that the Bard was Roman Catholic.

Known World Estrella War Digest for December

The Estrella War event team offers the Known World Estrella War Digest for December.

The Renaissance comes to Canberra

The National Gallery of Australia in Canberra will play host to the "first ever exhibition in Australia dedicated to Renaissance paintings." Artdaily.org has a review. Renaissance – 15th & 16th Century Italian Paintings from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo will be open December 9, 2011 - April 9, 2012.

Metropolitan Museum of Art reopens Islamic galleries

For eight years, the vast collections of Islamic art at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art has been unavailable to the public, but now visitors can enjoy the collection as never before. Holland Cotter of the New York Times has a review.

Renaissance portraiture showcased in Met exhibit

Those interested in Renaissance portraiture and costuming may want to visit the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibit The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini December 21, 2011–March 18, 2012.

Dining in Narnia

What if Anthony Bourdain, the caustic host of the Travel Channel's No Reservations, visited C.S. Lewis' Narnia? Fan writer Edo no Hana of An Archive of Our Own, thinks she knows.

Vikings invade England in the 21st century

Recent Nordic archaeological discoveries in Great Britain have sparked a new interest in all things Viking. In an article for the Guardian, arts and media correspondent Vanessa Thorpe looks at new trends, based on old tales that are driving current British culture.

Why red and green at Christmas?

As the Christmas season draws near, the colors red and green can be found everywhere, but who decided that these two colors should be associated with Christmas? Cambridge research scientist Dr Spike Bucklow believes he knows.

99 Danish thanes

For those old enough to have grooved to German popstar Nena's 99 Luftballoons, this video will make your day. Nena showcases her bardic chops with a retelling of Beowulf to the tune of her signature song.

The Story of Beowulf

See Rathflaed, the Black Bard of Meridies, (Stephen Melvin) tell the tale of Beowulf in storybook fashion on YouTube. Click, click, click. The slightly-adult audio version of the book is read by the author.

Farewell to Anne McCaffrey

Anne McCaffrey, noted science fiction and fantasy author, died Monday evening, leaving behind a legacy of some of the best-loved SF/fantasy novels. She is most famous for her Dragon Riders of Pern novel, and the series that followed, blending the two genres. She was 85 years old.

Knight learns lesson in 14th century ghost story

On the blog Puremedievalry, Sirthopas, a graduate student at Trinity College in Dublin, has posted a 14th century ghost story - in Middle English. Fortunately, he also includes his translation.

Vindolanda: What I did on my summer vacation

Writer Chris Rowe, winner of a recent Just Back article-writing contest for the travel page of the Telegraph, chronicles a summer-school visit to Vindolanda, the famous Roman fort near Hadrian's Wall in the north of England.

Searching for the Holy Grail at the Penn Museum

Any lecture which begins with a clip from Monty Python and the Holy Grail can't be bad. In a YouTube video, Dr. Richard Hodges, the Williams Director of the Penn Museum discusses "the legend of King Arthur, Camelot and the quest for the Holy Grail."

Art historian finds devil is really in the details

An art historian claims to have found an image of the devil in the fluffy clouds of a 13th century fresco by the early Renaissance artist Giotto. The fesco, in the Assisi Bascilica in Italy, depicts the death of St. Francis of Assisi.

The William Blackfox Awards - A.S. 45

Society Chronicler, Countess Honor of Restormel , has announced the winners of the A.S. 45 William Blackfox Awards. The awards are given for excellence in the production of SCA newsletters.

The scribes behind the Middle English masters

“The clerks of the London Guildhall form the invisible link between medieval authors like Geoffrey Chaucer and their first audiences, the original owners of the medieval manuscripts we study today,” said Professor Linne Mooney of the University of York.

Shakespeare film sure to spark controversy

Anonymous, the new film by director Roland Emmerich which proposes that the plays of William Shakespeare were actually written by someone else, is causing controversy even before the film hits theater screens. James Shapiro offers his opinion in an op-ed for the New York Times.