Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

Texas Medieval Conference

The Texas Medieval Association Conference will be held October 12-13, 2012 at the University of Houston.

Service, combat, and chivalry in Arab, Alabama

David Moore of the Arab Tribune newspaper joins Thorfinn Eriksonnr, Ingris Utlennigsdottir, and Mailloch of Wulfhaven as they meet for for fighting, A&S, and building a new group in northern Alabama.

Royal Collection Art

The Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace will exhibit more than 100 works by Northern European artists including Durer, Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger.

Shire of Iron Ox Academy of Performing Arts 2012

On July 28, 2012, the Shire of Iron Ox hosted the Academy of Performing Arts for the Kingdom of Gleann Abhann in Jackson, Mississippi.  The one day event was well attended.

Early Shakespeare theater found

Archaeologists from Museum of London Archaeology report that they have discovered the remains of a playhouse where Willianm Shakespeare staged some of his earliest plays. The Curtain Theatre north of the river Thames in Shoreditch pre-dated the Globe.

Ulrich von Liechtenstein: He will rock you!

Fans of the movie A Knight's Tale might be surprised to learn that Ulrich von Liechtenstein was a real person who, in fact, wrote an autobiography. Service of Ladies: an autobiography was first published in 2004 and is available from Boydell & Brewer Press.

Scientists claim to have found the remains of Mona Lisa

Archaeologists excavating the Convent of Saint Ursula in Florence believe they have found the remains of Lisa Gherardini, thought by art historians to be the model for Leonardo DaVinci's famed Mona Lisa.

16th century censorship

Long before the internet, writers with opinions contrary to those of the powers-that-be were victims of censorship. One such writer was the Dutch humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam whose writings were considered in conflict with the Catholic Church.

Fridrikr Tomasson av Knuslig Hamn placed on vigil at AEthelmearc Summer Academy

Maistir Brandubh Donnghaile, Silver Buccle Herald for the Kingdom of AEthelmearc, reports that Their Majesties Andreas and Kallista have placed Fridrikr Tomasson av Knuslig Hamn on vigil to contemplate elevation to the Order of the Laurel.

Known World Players to hold auditions at Pennsic 41

Master Lorcan Dracontius reports that the Known World Players will be holding auditions at Pennsic 41 for a new production to be presented at Pennsic 42.

Knowne World Poetry Competition

Lady Katarzyna Witkowska, Poeta Atlantiae, has annouced that there will be a Knowne World Poetry competition at the upcoming Pennsic War.

Online series filmed at Ozark Castle

Catherine Koehler reports that Epilogue, an online series dealing with plague and time travel, premiered on July 1, 2012. The series was partially filmed at the Ozark Medieval Fortress before it closed earlier this year.

Five queens for Navarre

The June 2012 issue of History Today features an article, "The She-Wolves of Navarre," by Elena Woodacre which chronicles the lives of five queens of the kingdom of Navarre from 1274 to 1512.

Return to the Shire

Cassie Carpenter, a reporter for the Daily Mail, takes a look at the set of the upcoming Peter Jackson film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, set to be released December 13, 2012. The article includes a trailer for the film. (video)

Photos of silk banner making class in Northshield

Sara reports that she has posted an album of photos from the Silk Banner Class taught by HSH Luce Tolle at the recent Stellar University of Northshield (SUN).

The writers of Shakespeare

On his blog, The Drum, journalist Bob Ellis returns to the controversy of the authorship of Shakespeare's plays with examples of how the bard - or any modern playwright - can claim complete ownership of his work.

Good and evil in Machiavelli's "The Prince"

400 years after its publication, Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince still inspires analysis and comment. One of the latest is a two-part story by Nick Spencer in the Guardian. The premise of the article: How do we utilise power to do good while utilising evil to keep power?

British Library announces plan to digitize Persian documents

The PARSA Community Foundation is teaming up with the British Library and others to provide online access to the Library's 11,000 Iranian manuscripts, one of the largest and best known in the world. The project is scheduled to be completed in 2014.

1000 years of London's records in new book

A new book by David Pearson looks at 1000 years of records for the city of London. London 1000 Years: Treasures from the Collections of the City of London is reviewed by Paul Lay on the History Today website.

O Fortuna: What you think you heard

OK, it isn't period to the Middle Ages, but we all love O Fortuna from Carmina Burana, right? It's the soundtrack from Excalibur, after all. But do you know the lyrics? Or only think you do...

"All's Well" with Thomas Middleton

A pair of professors from Oxford University believe they have confirmed William Shakespeare's collaborator, at least for the comedy All's Well that Ends Well. They believe it is Thomas Middleton, who worked with the Bard on Timon of Athens.

"FACES" project to identify historical figures

The University of California, Riverside, has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to use state-of-the-art facial recognition software to identify figures in paintings and sculpture.

The Tudor court from Cromwell's point of view

Henry VIII and his succession of wives continue to capture the imaginations of historians and readers of history. Now, a new novel, Bring Up the Bodies, by Hilary Mantel, follows the life, trial and death of Anne Boleyn and the involvement of Thomas Cromwell. Peter Green of The Book blog has a review.

The power of Botticelli's Venus

In a recent ArtBlog posted by The Guardian, Jonathan Jones ponders Botticelli's enduring masterpiece, The Birth of Venus, painted in 1484, and tries to discover if it is the ancient religion that makes it so compelling.

Exhibit reveals genius of Albrecht Dürer

A recent article in Christie's New Art Newspaper reviews a major exhibition of work by Germany's greatst artist Albrecht Dürer, The Early Dürer at the Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Nuremberg, 24 May-2 September, 2012.

Medieval English Alabaster Sculptures from the Victoria & Albert Museum

Art Services International has brought an exhibition of Medieval English Alabaster Sculptures from the Victoria & Albert Museum in London to the United States.

Romeo and Juliet in Baghdad

The World Shakespeare Festival in Stratford-upon-Avon, England has a unique offering this year, a new take on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet called Romeo and Juliet in Baghdad where the couple are not divided by family squabbles but by religious sects.

Byzantine exhibit showcased on History Today website

The May 2012 issue of History Today features a slideshow from a major exhibition at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art: Byzantium and Islam: Age of Transition. The exhibit runs through July 8, 2012.

Met exhibit marks Constantinople's first "Arab Spring"

The recent Arab Spring, in North Africa and the Middle East, was not the first, according to a Deborah Amos report on NPR. The first was the conflict of culture between the Byzantine Empire and the new Islamic religion in the seventh century to the ninth centuries.

Cataloging Elizabethan drunks

Drunkenness in Elizabethan England was not a rare occurance, to the extent, in fact, that satirist Thomas Nashe cataloged eight specific types. The website Lists of Note published Nashe's piece Eight Kindes of Drunkennes.