Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

MC busts some Chaucer at Oakland high school

Students at a high school in Oakland, California, attended a performance of "The Rap Canterbury Tales" by Dirk "Baba" Brinkman, a "hip-hop Chaucer rapper."

Science News: Art Historian Discovers Secret of Venetian Color

Researchers have now verified the secret that made Venetian Renaissance paintings "appear to glow." Art historian Louisa Matthew discovered that artists traded ideas and materials with dye and glass-makers.

Writer Andre Norton Dies at Age 93

The first exposure many SCA members have had to fantasy and science fiction stories was from author Andre Norton. She died March 17, 2005 at the age of 93.

Treasures in Full: Caxton's Chaucer

The British Library web site now features William Caxton’s digital images of two editions of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, probably printed in 1476 and 1483, in an online exhibit called "Treasures in Full: Caxton's Chaucer".

Lend Me Thine Ears: Medieval Poetry

Are you a "poet and don't know-et?" This week, Dame Aoife takes us on a poetic journey through this fine art that has been the choice of lovers, leaders, and lechers since time immemorial.

Merchant of Venice Comes to Film

Baron Tibor of Rock Valley recently attended the latest film version of Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice and wrote a review.

The Age: Loves Letters Found?

A new controversy involving the love letters of Abelard and Heloise has members of the literary and academic communities buzzing.

Washington Times: Marlowe Book Looks at Life in Elizabethan England

Columnist Vincent D. Balitas reviews a new book on Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe for the Washington Times.

Did Shakespeare Slander Macbeth?

Members of the Scottish Parliament are seeking to clear the reputation of the historical Macbeth for the 1,000th anniversary of his birth.

Da Vinci Fingerprint May Solve Mystery

The restoration of a renaissance painting, "The Adoration of the Christ Child," may have solved a mystery by revealing a fingerprint and stylistic touches that could tie the work to Leonardo Da Vinci.

"Da Vinci Code" Put on Trial

A museum in Lornardo Da Vinci's hometown Vinci, Italy, is holding a trial to sort out the facts from fiction in Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code.

New exhibit on boats in Chinese paintings at the Freer

"Boating on a River" will be on display at the Freer Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, through August 14, 2005.

Milan Calls Da Vinci Poster "Blasphemous"

City fathers in Milan, Italy have banned a French clothing company's advertisement featuring an all-female version of Da Vinci's famous painting of the Last Supper.

Sex in the Roman City

Natalie Bennett reviews Looking at Lovemaking: Constructions of Sexuality in Roman Art, 100 B.C. - A.D. 250, a new book by John R. Clarke that looks at sexuality and gender issues in Roman society.

Could you design this year's Pennsic medallion?

Mistress Chai'usun, who is in charge of Information Services for Pennsic War 34, is seeking donations of artwork for this year's site medallion on the theme "Ships, Sailing, and Seaports."

Hiëronymus Bosch Action Figures

Disturbingly fascinating, a collection of plastic sculptures of figures from paintings by Renaissance artist Hiëronymus Bosch can be viewed online.

Useful Latin Phrases for the Rest of Us

Sometimes it just sounds better in Latin!

Montefiascone Project Offers Medieval Experience in Summer Courses

The non-profit Montefiascone Project is offering summer 2005 courses related to the scribal arts in a medieval setting north of Rome.

Islamic Renaissance Workshop to be Presented in Maryland

The Center for Renaissance and Baroque Studies at the University of Maryland will present "The Impact of Islamic Culture on the Arts of the Renaissance," a day-long workshop, on February 4, 2005.

Finland's "Kalevala" Still has Influence in the Modern World

New York Times reporter Cori Ellison looks at the influence of the "Kalevala," Finland's national epic, on modern culture.

Northshield Dance Seminar XIX

Please join us for a day and night full of dancing as the Shire of Inner Sea presents: Northshield Dance Seminar XIX, March 19, 2005.

Chemist Discovers Secret of Renaissance Translucence

A chemist working for Washington's National Gallery of Art may have discovered the secret to the bright, translucent colors of European Renaissance paintings: ground glass.

That Cwazy Beowabbit!

A newly-translated Anglo-Saxon epic casts a whole new light on noble warriors. Enjoy!

Portrait of Thomas Howard Added to England's National Portrait Gallery

England's National Portrait Gallery has added a rare porait of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, to its collection. Howard was a powerful courtier during the reign of Elizabeth I.

Brueghel Painting Sells for $7 Million

The Kermesse of St. George, by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, was among the paintings auctioned at Sotheby's recently.

Exhibit on Flemish engravings on display in Minneapolis

"Flemish Fantasia: Invention and Imagination in Sixteenth Century Flemish Engravings" is on display at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts through February 27, 2005.

University Offers Intensive Turkish Study Opportunity

An intensive summer school seminar co-sponsored by University of Washington, Seattle and Harvard University will offer a number of classes designed to aid scholars in Turkish and Ottoman studies.

"Crusades: Myths and Realities" to Travel to Four Countries

An exhibition, funded by the European Union, of arts and artifacts from the Crusades has opened at the Municipal Arts Centre of Nicosia in Cyprus.

Seattle Art Museum Features Renaissance Exhibits

The Seattle Art Museum is currently running several exhibits of interest to medieval and renaissance researchers including Spain in the Age of Exploration 1492-1819.

"Song of Roland" Online

The Online Medieval and Classical Library presents its 12th offering, "The Song of Roland."