Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

David may have feet of clay

Experts believe that Michelangelo's famous statue of David is at risk of falling over due to cracks in the ankles caused by poor quality marble. Engineers fear the statue could crumble in event of an earthquake.

Lifestyles of the rich and Roman

A new exhibit on life in a Roman villa is now open at the Complesso di San Nicolo in Ravenna, Italy. Titled Otium: The Art of Living in the Roman House of the Imperial Age, the exhibit includes frescos, mosaics and over 100 household items.

Facebook Hamlet

OK, if Shakespeare could have texted, he would have, alright?! Sarah Schmelling offers a Facebook version of Hamlet.

16th century mechanical doll at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna

The Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna website features a 16th century mechanical, wooden doll which "plays the cittern, turns its head and seems to mince along with tiny steps while in fact running on wheels." (photo)

"Grave Goods" on display at Woodstock Museum

Grave Goods, an exhibit of the work of contemporary artists and craftsmen with a medieval theme, will be on display through November 1, 2008 at the Woodstock Museum in Woodstock, Ontario.

[ART] A Call To Arms (with Siege Weapons)

description:
The Barony of Arn Hold will be holding an Archery and Fighting event on the weekend of October 17-19th.

http://www.myscaphotos.com/2k8CallToArms.html

We are putting out a special challenge to the Populace of this great Kingdom to bring your bows, your swords, your rapiers and YOUR SIEGE WEAPONS!

That's right, the first ever "Fetchez la Vache" (or as we like to call it, "Fetchez la Moose") will be happening that weekend at the Call to Arms event. Location:
Emmit, Idaho (Arn Hold, Artemisia)

Queen Claude Prayer Book acquired by Morgan Library

Several months ago, the Morgan Library and Museum received a new treasure: the prayer book of Queen Claude of France, a contemporary of Anne Boleyn. Bound in red velvet, the book is smaller than a credit card and contains "fifty-two folios, painted front and back with a hundred and thirty-two miniature illuminations."

Was King Arthur French?

King Arthur might have been French. Heresy? Not according to the organizers of "King Arthur: A Legend in the Making," a medievalists' conference at Rennes University. Many of the Arthurian tales are set in Brittany in the north of France.

Rome's "She-Wolf" may be medieval in origin

News has rocked Rome that the famous Lupa Capitolina statue, that for centuries has been a powerful symbol of the city, may not be Etruscan in origin but medieval.

How do you say "football" in Welsh?

Perhaps football is not as modern of a game as we believed. References to versions of the game have been found as early as the 10th century in Welsh literature and in the Black Book of Carmarthen, the first manuscript written in Welsh, in the 13th.

A Muromachi period Tale of Genji manuscript found in Tokyo

The discovery of a rare full set of chapters of the 11th century The Tale of Genji, believed to be the world's oldest novel, has been found in a private collection in Tokyo.

Dante given stay of execution

Officials in Florence, Italy have granted Dante Alighieri, Italy's most famous poet, a stay of execution. The poet was exiled in 1302 with a mandate that he "would be executed if he stepped foot in the city again."

"Michelangelo Code" latest renaissance mystery

Reminiscent of "The Da Vinci Code," a decades-old mystery involves the claim that Michelangelo painted subversive messages into his frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, including "secret" profile of the medieval poet Dante and a portrait of Jesus on the cross.

"Renaissance Faces" at London's National Gallery

The autumn extravaganza at the National Gallery in London will be devoted to portraits from the Renaissance, including works from Van Eyck to Titian. Charlotte Higgins of the Guardian reports on what to expect. (photos)

Youthful portrait of Elizabeth I discovered

A rare portrait of the young Elizabeth I dating from between 1650 to 1680 has been discovered in a private collection at Boughton House in Northamptonshire.

Ealdormere: the Movie!

Once upon a time.... in a Kingdom to the North.... a group of re-enactors in their late-night Pennsic cups devised a drinking game wherein real-life actors were cast as SCA members in a very fictional film. The result: Ealdormere: the Movie!

Shakespeare First Folio brings over UK£400,000 at auction

A rare Shakespeare First Folio was auctioned by Christies recently bringing UK£435,250 from an unnamed purchaser. The book was sold to Sir Thomas Munro of Lindertis in 1837 and remained in the family until the 1970s when bought by Christies.

Renaissance armor at the Folger until September 2008

The Great Hall of the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C. glints with Renaissance armor as the library presents the exhibit Now Thrive the Armorers: Arms and Armor in Shakespeare June 5 through September 9, 2008.

Roman ritual plate found in Bulgaria

A beautifully-designed Roman marble plate, inscribed in Greek, has been found in the Bulgarian spa town of Hissar, known in Roman times as Diocletianopolis. The piece has been dated to the 3rd century C.E. (photo)

1200-year-old Leshan Buddha spared by earthquake

The devastating earthquake in China's southwestern Sichuan Province has spared the world's tallest statue of Buddha. The 71-meter tall Buddha, which is a world heritage site, draws millions of visitors to the province each year.

Was Shakespeare really a Jewish woman?

Shakespeare expert John Hudson has a new theory about who authored the Bard's plays: a Jewish woman named Amelia Bassano Lanier, the first woman to publish a book of poetry.

Collegium Cantorum to present concerts in Washington, D.C.

Collegium Cantorum, under the direction of Timothy Kendall, will present two performances of "DuFay: A Concert of Sacred Polyphony by the Preeminent Master of the Early Renaissance" on May 31 and June 1, 2008 in Washington D.C.

Portrait of Shakespeare's patron discovered

Experts believe they have discovered a portrait of Henry Wriothesley, Shakespeare's only known patron, under a later portrait of his wife, Elizabeth Vernon. The painted-over image was discovered using X-ray technology. (photo)

Beach books, medieval style

Are you a fan of medieval historical fiction? Don't know what to read next? Take a look at Nan Hawthorne's Medieval Novels website for ideas.

Medieval comic strip humor

The Museum of Depressionist Art website explains "medieval humor" with the help of the "Katzenjammer Kids" - or the medieval equivalent.

Ann Hathaway steps out of the shadows

Best known for her quaint house and her inheritance of the “second-best bed,” Shakespeare's wife, Ann Hathaway, has been mostly a mystery figure. Now a new book, Shakespeare's Wife by Germaine Greer, sheds some light on a little-understood woman. Katie Roiphe as the New York Times Sunday Review.

7th century Afghan oil paintings earliest discovered

Scientists working in the Bamiyan region of Afghanistan have discovered oil paintings on the walls of caves dating to the 7th centuries, 800 years before the earliest European oil paintings were created. (photos)

Book lust!

Readers, librarians, lovers of the book, cast your eyes upon this website which features wonderfully alluring photos of books and libraries. A feast for any bookworm!

Madonna of the Goldfinch shows its true colors

A recent restoration of Raphael's Madonna del Cardellino, painted in 1506, has revealed the brilliant colors of the original painting which had been hidden under centuries of grime. (Photos)

Pre-1640's Shakespeare folios to be digitized

The Bodleian and Folger Libraries are combining efforts to create digital copies of "all 75 editions of William Shakespeare's plays printed in the quarto format before the year 1641." The folios are the closest copies to Shakepseare's own in existence.