Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

Need Scottish Images for 1450-1500

I'm trying to put together a book trailer for my Scottish Medieval novel that will be released in Spring 2010. I'm hoping to find colored images/illustrations/photos/pictorials of some sort for the time period of 1450-1500. I'd like the clothing to be authentic to the time period which will rule out kilts. My hero is a MacPhearson with dark hair and my heroine is a MacKenzie with auburn hair.

"Dead Parrot's" early ancestor discovered

A 4th century Greek ancestor of Monty Python's famous "Dead Parrot Sketch" has been found in a joke wherein "a man complains that a slave he was sold had died." The joke, translated from the Greek, is from Philogelos The Laugh Addict.

Grave of d’Artagnan found?

Musketeer expert Odile Bordaz believes she has discovered the final resting place of Charles de Batz de Castelmore d’Artagnan, made famous in Alexandre Dumas’s novel The Three Musketeers, who died during the Siege of Maastricht in the Netherlands in 1673.

Book-a-Minute: Beowulf

Don't have time to read a classic? Here's the ultimate Book-a-Minute version of Beowulf!

Modern technology used to help restore "Madonna of the Goldfinch"

"X-rays, CAT scans, reflective infra-red photography, lasers, men and women in white coats, microscopes, latex gloves" all played a part in the restoration of Raphael's masterpiece "Madonna of the Goldfinch," a 10-year project with stunning results. (photo)

SCA in evidence at Doña Ana Arts Council Renaissance ArtsFaire

Members of the SCA were present at the recent Renaissance ArtsFaire sponsored by the Doña Ana Arts Council in Las Cruces, New Mexico. The Faire features artists dressed in period garb who display and demonstrate their wares. S. Derrickson Moore of the Las Cruces Sun-News has the story.

"Glimmering visions" await visitors to Byzantine treasures exhibit

Visitors to Byzantium: Treasures of a lost empire at London's Royal Academy of Arts are in for a treat. Over 350 seldom-seen artifacts from the museum's collection and others will be on display until March 22, 2009. Rachel Campbell-Johnston of the Times Online has a review.

Pick the best historical fiction blog

Nan Hawthorne invites readers to visit theTales from the Shield-Wall Books website and vote for the five best historical fiction blogs.

Digital books available from the British Library

In its Treasures in Full program, the British Library is offering "high-quality digital editions, free to your desktop."

Collegium Cantorum to perform in Washington DC area

Britton reports that Collegium Cantorum, under the direction of Timothy Kendall, will present "Pirchon (or, 'Pete of the Street')", a concert of Renaissance Sacred Polyphony by Pierre de la Rue (c.1452-1518) on November 15 and 16, 2008 in the Washington D.C. area.

Afflication of the "Ugly Duchess" indentified

The painting entitled "Old Woman," but better known as the "Ugly Duchess," is one of the most popular in London's National Gallery. It depicts the face of a grotesquely-featured woman, and was painted by Flemish artist Quinten Massys in 1513. Now, experts believe that they have identified the illness suffered by this woman as a rare form of Paget's disease, which deforms the bones. (photo)

Henry VIII biography marks king's 500th anniversary

Henry: Virtuous Prince by David Starkey, a two-volume biography of Henry VIII, will mark the 500th anniversary of Henry's ascent to the throne of England. John Guy of the London Times has the review.

The "New Yorker" looks at "The Florentine"

In an article for The New Yorker, Claudia Roth Pierpont looks at the life of Niccolò Machiavelli, "the man who taught rulers how to rule."

Renaissance artists enjoyed their own "art scene"

Where did Renaissance painters go to unwind? According to Tony Perrottet of Drexel University's The Smart Set, it was La Società del Pauiolo, the Company of the Cauldron, an artists-only club that required participants to bring an artwork and a dish to pass.

"Hogwarts Professor" claims alchemy used to change characters in Potter books

John Granger believes there is so much more to the Harry Potter universe than magic potions. He shares his thoughts through a series of books and lectures which, he hopes, "disclose the underlying symbolism hidden in the so-called 'children’s stories.'"

David may have feet of clay

Experts believe that Michelangelo's famous statue of David is at risk of falling over due to cracks in the ankles caused by poor quality marble. Engineers fear the statue could crumble in event of an earthquake.

Lifestyles of the rich and Roman

A new exhibit on life in a Roman villa is now open at the Complesso di San Nicolo in Ravenna, Italy. Titled Otium: The Art of Living in the Roman House of the Imperial Age, the exhibit includes frescos, mosaics and over 100 household items.

Facebook Hamlet

OK, if Shakespeare could have texted, he would have, alright?! Sarah Schmelling offers a Facebook version of Hamlet.

16th century mechanical doll at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna

The Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna website features a 16th century mechanical, wooden doll which "plays the cittern, turns its head and seems to mince along with tiny steps while in fact running on wheels." (photo)

"Grave Goods" on display at Woodstock Museum

Grave Goods, an exhibit of the work of contemporary artists and craftsmen with a medieval theme, will be on display through November 1, 2008 at the Woodstock Museum in Woodstock, Ontario.

[ART] A Call To Arms (with Siege Weapons)

The Barony of Arn Hold will be holding an Archery and Fighting event on the weekend of October 17-19th.

We are putting out a special challenge to the Populace of this great Kingdom to bring your bows, your swords, your rapiers and YOUR SIEGE WEAPONS!

That's right, the first ever "Fetchez la Vache" (or as we like to call it, "Fetchez la Moose") will be happening that weekend at the Call to Arms event. Location:
Emmit, Idaho (Arn Hold, Artemisia)

Queen Claude Prayer Book acquired by Morgan Library

Several months ago, the Morgan Library and Museum received a new treasure: the prayer book of Queen Claude of France, a contemporary of Anne Boleyn. Bound in red velvet, the book is smaller than a credit card and contains "fifty-two folios, painted front and back with a hundred and thirty-two miniature illuminations."

Was King Arthur French?

King Arthur might have been French. Heresy? Not according to the organizers of "King Arthur: A Legend in the Making," a medievalists' conference at Rennes University. Many of the Arthurian tales are set in Brittany in the north of France.

Rome's "She-Wolf" may be medieval in origin

News has rocked Rome that the famous Lupa Capitolina statue, that for centuries has been a powerful symbol of the city, may not be Etruscan in origin but medieval.

How do you say "football" in Welsh?

Perhaps football is not as modern of a game as we believed. References to versions of the game have been found as early as the 10th century in Welsh literature and in the Black Book of Carmarthen, the first manuscript written in Welsh, in the 13th.

A Muromachi period Tale of Genji manuscript found in Tokyo

The discovery of a rare full set of chapters of the 11th century The Tale of Genji, believed to be the world's oldest novel, has been found in a private collection in Tokyo.

Dante given stay of execution

Officials in Florence, Italy have granted Dante Alighieri, Italy's most famous poet, a stay of execution. The poet was exiled in 1302 with a mandate that he "would be executed if he stepped foot in the city again."

"Michelangelo Code" latest renaissance mystery

Reminiscent of "The Da Vinci Code," a decades-old mystery involves the claim that Michelangelo painted subversive messages into his frescoes in the Sistine Chapel, including "secret" profile of the medieval poet Dante and a portrait of Jesus on the cross.

"Renaissance Faces" at London's National Gallery

The autumn extravaganza at the National Gallery in London will be devoted to portraits from the Renaissance, including works from Van Eyck to Titian. Charlotte Higgins of the Guardian reports on what to expect. (photos)

Youthful portrait of Elizabeth I discovered

A rare portrait of the young Elizabeth I dating from between 1650 to 1680 has been discovered in a private collection at Boughton House in Northamptonshire.