Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

Sackler Gallery to present "Gods of Angkor"

The Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. will host Gods of Angkor: Bronzes from the National Museum of Cambodia, "the first international exhibition to focus specifically on the skills and achievements of Khmer bronze casters," May 15, 2010 through January 23, 2011.

Website traces European effigies

The Effigies and Brasses website offers links and images for numerous European effigies, brasses, incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations dating from the 12th-15th centuries.

Show of Medieval Ivories at Munich Museum

Ivory works of art separated for centuries have been reunited in a new show at the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich, Germany. Objects that originally stood together but found their way to separate collections are on display side by side until December 2010.

Jewish contributions to medieval Spain

“Uneasy Communion: Jews, Christians and the Altarpieces of Medieval Spain”  opened recently at the Museum of Biblical Art near New York's Lincoln Center. The exhibition takes a historical approach to Jewish contributions to Christian art in the two centuries before they were expelled from Spain by Queen Isabella in 1492.

Artist inspired by medieval and SCA themes

Canadian artist and SCA member Dani Lachuk shows the influence of the Middle Ages and the Society for Creative Anachronism in her paintings and portraits. Examples of her work are available to view online.

Robin Hood: the Man, the Myth, the Movies

In a wide-ranging feature article, Stephen Moss discusses the development of the Robin Hood legend, its possible historical bases, and the new film starring Russell Crowe.

"Anonymous" looks at the subject of Shakespeare authorship

Ronald Emmerich, who directed such major films as 2012 and Independence Day, will take on a less earth-shaking project with his new project Anonymous. The film will investigate whether Edward de Vere was the real author of Shakespeare's plays.

"Double Falsehood" finally attributed to Shakespeare

Experts have now credited co-authorship of the play Double Falsehood to William Shakespeare and another dramatist, John Fletcher. The play was originally discovered nearly 300 years ago.

Design your own fabric

Looking for a just the right fabric for a special project but can't find what you need? Spoonflower Fabrics will create a fabric from your design.

16th century museum reopens in Venice

The concept of a museum to view art and antiquities was unknown until 16th century Venice when wealthy families designed buildings to showcase Roman statuary. Now the Palazzo Grimani, one of the pioneering museums of the city, has restored and reopened to the public.

Author looks at fantasy and role-playing underground

Author Ethan Gilsdorf has produced a new book entitled Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks: An Epic Quest for Reality Among Role Players, Online Gamers, and Other Dwellers of Imaginary Realms, which looks at the role-playing and fantasy culture, including the SCA. (video)

Crusaders: Villains or saints?

Historians have long debated the motives and actions of the medieval crusaders who took the Holy Land by force in the 11th century. New York Times reviewer Eric Ormsby has a review.

Shakespeare scholar takes on authorship issue

Author James Shapiro, whose 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare, delighted the literary world, has a new book, this time investigating whether the Bard of Stratford-upon-Avon actually wrote his plays. Robert McCrum of The Observer has a review.

Ultra-violet rays reveal Giotto treasures in Florence chapel

Restoration experts using ultra-violet technology have rediscovered details of 14th wall paintings by the Italian master Giotto in the Peruzzi Chapel at the Santa Croce Church in Florence, Italy. (photo)

Google to digitize Italian libraries

Google has signed an agreement to digitize one million books, written before 1868, from libraries in Rome and Florence. The books will be free on Google Books.

Song of the Skywalkers

On his blog, Tattúínárdœla saga, Norse scholar Jackson Crawford discusses the "complicated textual tradition that lies behind George Lucas’s “Star Wars,” which few outside the scholarly community realize is a modern rendition of an old Germanic legend of a fatal conflict between a father and his treacherous son."

"Modeling Devotion" showcases Renaissance sculpture

A new exhibit at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusets, focusses on the largely-overlooked field of painted Renaissance terracotta sculptures.

Lasers to be used to clean historic paintings

Long used to clean metal and stone, lasers may be the new tool of choice for cleaning famous works of art. The technique is the same used to remove tattoos.

Medieval Studies Conference

Penn State is pleased to announce the twenty-second Medieval Studies conference will be held on Saturday, May 1, 2010 in the Weaver Building on the University Park campus of the Pennsylvania State University.

[DRA] Winchester Pilgrimage

Come all ye pilgrims and travellers, and join the Shire of West
Dragoningshire for a pilgrimage at the Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse
of Noble Poverty.

The love poems of Michelangelo on display

In his fifties, it appears that renaissance master Michelangelo fell in love with a Roman nobleman 40 years his junior. A record of the infatuation can be found in handwritten sonnets on display for the first time at the British Museum in London.

Bardic-Circle.net

Bardic-circle.net is a website providing a collaborative resource for the SCA bardic community.

Included are tools, such as a SCA lyrics wiki, a calendar for bardic events around the world, a discussion board and more.

Beautiful blacksmithing

Cal Lane has taken the art of blacksmithing to a whole new level by transforming 44 gallon steel drums into works of art.

"Suburban Knights: A return to the Middle Ages" on sale now

Author and photographer E. F. Kitchen has produced a new book on the Society for Creative Anachronism entitled Suburban Knights: A return to the Middle Ages.

Renaissance texts "unread and unstudied"

In a podcast for the Classics and Ancient History website, Peter Mack and Maude Vanhalen discuss Renaissance thought and the fact that much of its works, most written in Latin, have been "largely unread and unstudied." (MP3)

SCAdians to present writing workshop

SCA members Kevin Nunn and Helen Marshall (Arminius the Footsore and Gwerydd verch Rhys) will present a one-day fiction writing workshop at Massey College in Toronto, Ontario on March 28, 2010.

Mona Lisa identity may cause da Vinci exhumation

A team of experts from Italy’s National Committee for Cultural Heritage are requesting permission to exhume the remains of Leonardo da Vinci in hopes of revealing the real identity of the Mona Lisa.

Icelandic Saga Database online

Wyndreth of the Kingdom of Northshield reports that an Icelandic Saga Database, offering a "huge selection of Icelandic sagas in various languages, is now available online for viewing or download in PDF format.

Northshield authors celebrate publication of novels

Two novelists from the Kingdom of Northshield have announced the recent publication of books.

[MID] Third Bardic Roundhouse

The Barony of the Cleftlands, the Shire of Eastwatch, and Gorsedd -- the community of bards in northern Oaken, Middle Kingdom -- are proud to announce The Third Bardic Roundhouse, June 18-20, 2010, back at Minion Ridge in Eastwatch.