Fine Arts

Painting, sculpture, and similar forms of artistic expression.

Microscopic Henry VIII brings UK£11m

Artist Willard Wigan's work cannot be hung on the wall. In fact, some is so tiny, it should be viewed with a microscope, but his delicate sculpture of Henry VIII and his wives - in the eye of a needle - along with nearly 70 other pieces, was just purchased for UK£11m. (photo)

SCAdian filmmaker debuts film

Indie filmmaker and SCA member Dana Elise recently premiered her new film set in the "fantasy middle ages." Cagin of Chrysaint debuted June 26, 2010 at the Petal Civic Center in Petal, Mississippi. (video)

Confirmed as Tintoretto, painting still baffles scholars

When the National Trust took over the Kingston Lacy mansion, the filthy old painting on the wall could not be identified. Now, after cleaning, the painting is confirmed as the work of Renaissance master Tintoretto, but art historians aren't sure who the allegorical figures in the picture are meant to represent.

"Suburban Knights" photos feature SCA models

Photographs from E.F. Kitchen's new book, Suburban Knights: A Return to the Middle Ages, will be on display at the Powerhouse Arena in Brooklyn, New York beginning July 14. Kitchen will also sign copies of the book at Pennsic 39, and her work will be reviewed in the Pennsic Independent.

"Horrible Histories" author calls historians horrible

Terry Deary's Horrible Histories series appeals to schoolchildren by including disgusting and true historical details, such as the purpose of the Roman vomitorium. But the author finds modern historians even more nauseating than the Romans.

Freer Gallery to present exhibit on Chinese painting

The Freer Gallery of Art in Washngton, D.C. will present Masterpieces of Chinese Painting June 12 - November 28, 2010. The exhibit will showcase Chinese painting from the late 10th to the early 18th century.

Cleveland galleries reopen after renovation

The Cleveland Museum of Art announced that six more of its permanent galleries, including the medieval gallery and the gallery of European painting and sculpture 1500-1800, will reopen June 26, 2010 after extensive renovation.

"Light of the Sufis" at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts

Now through August 8, 2010, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts will host Light of the Sufis: The Mystical Arts of Islam, an exhibit that "focuses on some of the most important Sufi ideas and practices that found expression through the arts of the Islamic world."

Chaucer blog mystery revealed

Fans of Geoffrey Chaucer Hath A Blog will be interested to learn that the author's identity has been revealed. The revelation took place at the Kalamazoo Medieval Congress. Jeffrey J. Cohen has the story on his In the Middle blog.

Medici collection sculpture to be sold

An antiquity once owned by Lorenzo de Medici will go on sale at Sotheby's June 11. 'Il Magnifico' laid claim to Three Satrys Fighting a Serpent shortly after its excavation in 1489.

Can Botticelli make you high?

A plant in Botticelli's Venus and Mars resembles the hallucinogen Datura stramonium. Blogger Jonathan Jones speculates that the artist intended the painting to affect the viewer like taking a love potion.

Murals and icons from St. Nikita's Monastery online

Professor Michael J. Fuller has created a website featuring murals and iconography from Saint Nikita's Monastery, an 11th century Macedonian church rebuilt in the 13th century by the Serbian King Milutin.

"Uneasy Lies The Head" hits bookstores

S. P, Hendrick, in the SCA Morgaine from the Kingdom of Caid, has announced the release of her book Uneasy Lies the Head by Pendraig Publishing.

Vatican treasures at Missouri History Museum

Over two hundred rare works of art and historical artifacts are on display May 15-September 12, 2010 at the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis.

Handmade Hobbit hole

Maddie Chambers is obsessed. At 10 she read Lord of the Rings. As a college student, she created her own A4 type size model Hobbit hole, complete with garden and tiny windows. (photos)

Sackler Gallery to present "Gods of Angkor"

The Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. will host Gods of Angkor: Bronzes from the National Museum of Cambodia, "the first international exhibition to focus specifically on the skills and achievements of Khmer bronze casters," May 15, 2010 through January 23, 2011.

Website traces European effigies

The Effigies and Brasses website offers links and images for numerous European effigies, brasses, incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations dating from the 12th-15th centuries.

Show of Medieval Ivories at Munich Museum

Ivory works of art separated for centuries have been reunited in a new show at the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich, Germany. Objects that originally stood together but found their way to separate collections are on display side by side until December 2010.

Jewish contributions to medieval Spain

“Uneasy Communion: Jews, Christians and the Altarpieces of Medieval Spain”  opened recently at the Museum of Biblical Art near New York's Lincoln Center. The exhibition takes a historical approach to Jewish contributions to Christian art in the two centuries before they were expelled from Spain by Queen Isabella in 1492.

Artist inspired by medieval and SCA themes

Canadian artist and SCA member Dani Lachuk shows the influence of the Middle Ages and the Society for Creative Anachronism in her paintings and portraits. Examples of her work are available to view online.

Robin Hood: the Man, the Myth, the Movies

In a wide-ranging feature article, Stephen Moss discusses the development of the Robin Hood legend, its possible historical bases, and the new film starring Russell Crowe.

"Anonymous" looks at the subject of Shakespeare authorship

Ronald Emmerich, who directed such major films as 2012 and Independence Day, will take on a less earth-shaking project with his new project Anonymous. The film will investigate whether Edward de Vere was the real author of Shakespeare's plays.

"Double Falsehood" finally attributed to Shakespeare

Experts have now credited co-authorship of the play Double Falsehood to William Shakespeare and another dramatist, John Fletcher. The play was originally discovered nearly 300 years ago.

Design your own fabric

Looking for a just the right fabric for a special project but can't find what you need? Spoonflower Fabrics will create a fabric from your design.

16th century museum reopens in Venice

The concept of a museum to view art and antiquities was unknown until 16th century Venice when wealthy families designed buildings to showcase Roman statuary. Now the Palazzo Grimani, one of the pioneering museums of the city, has restored and reopened to the public.

Author looks at fantasy and role-playing underground

Author Ethan Gilsdorf has produced a new book entitled Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks: An Epic Quest for Reality Among Role Players, Online Gamers, and Other Dwellers of Imaginary Realms, which looks at the role-playing and fantasy culture, including the SCA. (video)

Crusaders: Villains or saints?

Historians have long debated the motives and actions of the medieval crusaders who took the Holy Land by force in the 11th century. New York Times reviewer Eric Ormsby has a review.

Shakespeare scholar takes on authorship issue

Author James Shapiro, whose 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare, delighted the literary world, has a new book, this time investigating whether the Bard of Stratford-upon-Avon actually wrote his plays. Robert McCrum of The Observer has a review.

Ultra-violet rays reveal Giotto treasures in Florence chapel

Restoration experts using ultra-violet technology have rediscovered details of 14th wall paintings by the Italian master Giotto in the Peruzzi Chapel at the Santa Croce Church in Florence, Italy. (photo)

Google to digitize Italian libraries

Google has signed an agreement to digitize one million books, written before 1868, from libraries in Rome and Florence. The books will be free on Google Books.