Chinese

World of Khubilai Khan at the Met

September 28, 2010 - January 2, 2011, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will play host to The World of Khubilai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty, an exhibit of fine and decorative art from the 13th and 14th centuries.

Freer Gallery to present exhibit on Chinese painting

The Freer Gallery of Art in Washngton, D.C. will present Masterpieces of Chinese Painting June 12 - November 28, 2010. The exhibit will showcase Chinese painting from the late 10th to the early 18th century.

Sacred Caves of the Silk Road

A recent issue of National Geographic visits the Mogao caves of Dunhuang, China. Located along the Silk Road, the Mogao caves are a series of man-made caves carved into the cliffs between the 6th and 14th centuries.

Maps: "Snapshots" of history

Most of us think of a map as a tool for getting from one place to another. But throughout history, mapmakers have had other priorities than providing a factual picture of the world.

Evidence of infused tea found in 12th century tombs

The discovery of green tea leaves in Chinese tombs may prove that infused tea was being served as far back as the 12th century, instead of only in modern times, as previously believed.

A visit to Jewish China

A New York Times article by Matthew Fishbane tells the story of the author's trip to Kaifeng in search of remnants of of one China's medieval Jewish communities.

Early Chinese paintings subject of Freer & Sackler Galleries website

The Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution have announced a new online resource for the study of early Chinese painting. The site features over 80 examples of 10th through 14th century artwork.

1602 map shows China at the center of the world

In 1602, when he created the first Chinese map to name the Americas, Matteo Ricci was a Jesuit missionary living in Bejing. His map is currently on display at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. (photo)

Great Wall longer than previously believed

A newly-discovered section of China's Great Wall shows that the structure was actually at least 11 kilometers longer than previously believed. The new section was found in the northeastern Jilin province.

Freer Gallery of Art acquires 13th century Japanese tea jar

The Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art has acquired a rare 13th-14th century tea jar "widely revered as an icon of Japanese tea culture." The jar, originally made in China, has been used to store tea for over five centuries. (photo)

4th - 6th century Silla Dynasty armor discovered in Hwango-dong

From paintings, researchers know about the armor worn by Silla Dynasty cavalrymen, but now they will be able to study it first hand. The remains of a set of armor, dating from sometime between the fourth and sixth centuries, has been discovered in an ancient tomb in the Jjoksaem District of Hwango-dong, Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang. (photos, diagrams)

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure-dome decree

Marco Polo, in his travel notes, wrote of Kublai Khan's massive capital, Xanadu. Now Chinese archaeologists believe they can reconstruct a layout of the city. The basis for their claim is a three-month long excavation of Yuan Shangdu, which they think is the historic Xanadu.

Palace of the Great Khan may lie beneath Khara Khorum

In the 13th century, Kublai Khan, grandson of the great Genghis Khan, moved the ruling city of China to Beijing, but prior to the time, the Mongolian capital, Khara Khorum, was an international city of great renown. Now archaeologists believe they know the whereabouts of the Palace of the Great Khan.

Citizen strives to save Beijing artifacts

Many of China's historic buildings have been torn down, and others are scheduled for demolition, in an effort to provide room for a growing economy. Some citizens, like hospice administrator Li Songtang, are trying to save what little is left.

Climate change may have affected Chinese dynasties

A new report by researchers from the University of Minnesota and Lanzhou University in China in the journal Science has linked climate change, especially lack of rainfall, to the rise and fall of dynasties in China.

Public may help look for tomb of Genghis Khan

800 years after his death, scientists at the University of California San Diego's Center for Interdisciplinary Science in Art, Architecture and Archaeology (CISA3) are using advanced visualization technologies to try to find the long-lost grave of the emperor Genghis Khan.

9th century shipwreck reveals perfectly-preserved porcelain

The remains of a Chinese ship carrying earthenware jars, painted bowls and gold cups dating to the 7th - 10th centuries, has been discovered off the southeast coast of Sumatra. The lavishness of the artifacts leads experts to speculate that the items might have been gifts from the Tang Emperor.

Eunuch's-eye-view of China's Forbidden City

A new virtual tour of Beijing's Forbidden City allows visitors to step into the silk slippers of an imperial eunuch for a behind-the-scenes virtual tour of the cultural treasure.

Chinese Chess

Looking for a new period game - or an interesting A&S project? How about Tangut Chess, a game popular by the end of the Northern Song (960-1127) dynasty. The 32-piece set can be made from bronze or pottery.

[ATL] Winter Solstice: Mongols, Mayhem, and Murder

description:
Good friends, on this day in the fall of 1274 on the island of Tsushima (off the coast of Japan), we are about to witness historic events. The Mongols are prepared to invade Japan, and the negotiations and banquet today are an attempt to forestall the invasion. A wealthy Japanese lord has laid on an amazing day of festivities, highlighted by a feast guaranteed to delight all guests!

In honor of the attendees, the feast will feature courses of Mongol and Chinese cuisine, in addition to Japanese. Unfortunately, these important negotiations are destined to be marred by murder(s) most foul! But this is more than a stage play, and you dear friends are more than honored guests. We are counting on you to answer the age old questions “Whodunit?” and “why”? At the end of the afternoon, each guest will be asked to fill out a sheet of paper describing their interpretation of the mystery, and who the culprit(s) is(are). After evaluating the detectives’ work, the murderer(s) will be hauled off in chains to face the Emperor’s Justice, and the detective who solved the crime most correctly will win a prize. Location:
Barony of Sacred Stone (Winston-Salem, North Carolina)

Archaeologist re-creates ancient booze

Patrick McGovern, a molecular archaeologist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, does not hesitate to chat about the history of alcoholic beverages, and has even re-created a "9,000-year-old Chinese drink we call Jiahu."

Medieval China being lost to modernisation

Historic Chinese buildings, some dating to the 13th century, are being lost to progress as an explosion of construction overcomes Beijing's old neighborhoods. Especially at risk are the classic hutongs, narrow alleyways created by Mongols during the Yuan dynasty.

Author claims Da Vinci's drawings based on Chinese technology

Gavin Menzies, who in 2002 theorized that the Chinese reached the America's 7 decades before Columbus, has a new theory: Leonardo da Vinci's drawings were based on scientific encyclopedias brought to Italy in 1430 by a Chinese fleet.

Vietnamese waged fierce battle against Kublai Khan.

Researchers from Flinders University in Adelaide, South Australia are hoping to shed new light on the 13th century battle between ships from the fleet of China’s emperor Kublai Khan and the Vietnamese general Tran Hung Dao, who defended the Bach Dang River near Hanoi.

New book claims China started the Renaissance

“A sophisticated Chinese delegation visited Italy in 1434, sparked the Renaissance and forever changed the course of Western civilization." This is the premise of a controversial new book by Gavin Menzies 1421: The Year China Discovered the World.

1200-year-old Leshan Buddha spared by earthquake

The devastating earthquake in China's southwestern Sichuan Province has spared the world's tallest statue of Buddha. The 71-meter tall Buddha, which is a world heritage site, draws millions of visitors to the province each year.

Tibetan Arms and Armor at Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City will host Tibetan Arms and Armor from the Permanent Collection through fall 2009 in the Arms and Armor Galleries, 1st floor, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gallery.

Ceramics trade between Israel and China flourished in Crusader times

New research from the University of Haifa shows that a healthy trade existed between the eastern Mediterranean and China during the 12th and 13th centuries. The trade consisted mainly of ceramics and pottery.

Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna Exhibits "Treasures from the national Palace Museum, Taiwan"

Soon a new exhibition will be on display at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna: Treasures from the national Palace Museum, Taiwan begins at February 26, 2008 and runs until May 13, 2008.

Build yourself a yurt

Raoul, St. Florian de la Riviere, of the Kingdom of Lochac, has posted instruction on how to build a yurt or gher.