Chinese

Discover the art of the Song Dynasty at the Freer/Sackler Gallery

The Freer/Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution presents an exhibition of Chinese landscape painting from the 10th through 13th centuries entitled Style in Chinese Landscape Painting: The Song Legacy, May 17–October 26, 2014.

Chinese "Tupperware" helped create Japanese tea ceremony

"This is the Chinese version of Tupperware," says Andrew Watsky, professor of Japanese art history at Princeton, about tea storage jars that became a staple of the tea ceremony in 16th century Japan. Watsky spoke recently with Morning Edition's Susan Stamberg about the history of the ceremony.

Freer/Sackler Galleries receive grant for Chinese art conservator

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian in Washigton D.C. have received a US$1 million challenge grant, awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to endow the position of an assistant Chinese painting conservator.

Song Dynasty murals revealed in Tibet

Experts renovating an ancient Buddhist temple in Lhasa, Tibet have discovered a number of murals dating to the Song Dynasty (960 to 1279). "This discovery is crucial for us to reconstruct the way of life of that period. We will do our best to restore the murals to their original state,they will no doubt become a national level artefact," said Chen Zujun. (photos)

Chinese coin found in Kenya suggests medieval trade route

Archaeologists have unearthed a 15th century Chinese coin on the Kenyan island of Manda. This find predates European exploration of Asia, indicating the Chinese may have traded directly with Africa.

Spencer Museum of Art to present two-day symposium on Color in Ancient and Medieval East Asia

The Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas will present a two-day symposium bringing "together an international and interdisciplinary team of scholars from the arts, humanities, and sciences to explore the roles that color played in the society, politics, thought, art, and ritual practices of ancient and medieval East Asia." Deadline for online registration is March 1, 2013.

In search of rockets

While rockets are often thought of as the realm of modern scientists and the military, they have their roots in medieval China. This article traces their roots from a 12th century party trick to their evolution as the terror of Mongolian invaders.

Kublai Khan and the Mongol invasion of China

China had been an empire for over 1,000 year when the Mongol heir to Genghis, Kublai Khan, roared into the southern part of the country in the 13th century. Carrie Gracie of the BBC has a feature story.

New terracotta warriors found in China

Over 100 new terracotta warriors have been found in China, some with bright paint on them. Terracotta horses along with real weapons and parts of a chariot have also been found.

Dragon lanterns shine light on centuries past

In honor the the Year of the Dragon, the Chengdu Temple Fair in China is displaying 43 dragon-themed lantern sets, some dating back centuries.

Mongol shipwreck might be part of invasion force

In the 13th century, Mongol leader and Chinese ruler Kublai Khan attempted to invade Japan. A witness to the ill-fated attempt may have been found off the coast of Nagasaki in the form of a nearly-intact Chinese ship.

"Mysterious" Silk Road city found

Chinese archaeologists believe they have discovered evidence of an important Silk Road city which disappeared in the 3rd century CE.

Chinese archaeological excavation gives insight into Liao dynasty

For the first time, Chinese archaeologists are getting the opportunity to mount a large-scale investigation of the Upper Capital of the Liao dynasty. The first structure excavated was the Qiande Gate of the royal city.

Ancient wine found in China

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000 year old wine jug in Henan Province, China. The copper pot, sealed by centuries of rust, still has liquid in it.

Smithsonian exhibit sparks controversy

A display of 9th century Chinese pottery, discovered in 1998 in the wreck of an Arabic ship near Indonesia, has sparked controvery in the archaeological community. Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds, was scheduled to be exhibited at Washington's Smithsonian Institution.

[MER] Hit List

We the Barony of the Osprey do wish to extend an invitation to one and all to join us for a journey down the Silk Road in this the Year of the Metal Rabbit. Please come and join us at historic Fort Gaines on Dauphin Island for a weekend of fighting, feasting, and fun.

Well preserved Ming dynasty mummy found

A female mummy dating to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644 CE) has been unearthed in Taizhou, China. The mummy is in an excellent state of preservation including skin, hair, clothes, shoes, and jewelery.

Tons of Song Dynasty coins found in Chinese kiln

Several tons of copper coins dating to the Song Dynasty (960-1279 CE) were found recently in an ancient kiln in northwest China’s Shaanxi Province. The coins were strung into ropes through a center hole. (photos)

Chinese settlement may show evidence of lost Roman army.

In the 1990's, archaeologists were surprised to discover evidence of early western settlers in a remote town in China's Yongchang County on the edge of the Gobi desert, including a Roman style fort and nearby residents with blonde hair and green eyes.

History of spectacles

Corrective lenses have a long history. Glasses filled with water and gems were used by Romans in the 1st century, while the Chinese developed spectacles in the 13th. In an article for the Telegraph, Victoria Ward looks at the history of eyeglasses.

Plague orignated in China

Several new studies of the Bubonic Plague, which devasted Europe in the Middle Ages and the 17th century, have led researchers to the conclusion that the disease originated in China and was carried west over the Silk Road.

[WES] Rivenoak Yule

The Barony of Rivenoak presents our annual Yule Feast on December 4, 2010. We welcome most warmly the populace of our glorious Kingdom back into Rivenoak Keep.

Metropolitan Museum to host treasures of Khubilai Khan

New York's Metropolitan Museum will offer visitors a glimpse of the delights of 13th century China when it plays host to The Legend of Khubilai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty, an exhibit of "lavish costumes, stunning paintings and priceless jewels."

Siberian mystery

On an island in the middle of a remote lake in Siberia, not far from the Mongolian border, lies the fortress of Por-Bajin. Por-Bajin is an archaeological site that dates to the 8th or 9th century. Its walls enclose 7 acres (2.8 hectares), a maze of about 30 buildings.

Ancient chess pieces found in China

10 chess pieces dating to the 3rd century have been found in a tomb in Pingshan, China.

Traditional Chinese weaving techniques endangered

The UNESCO website features traditional Li textile techniques of spinning, dyeing, weaving and embroidering as employed by women of the Li ethnic group of Hainan Province, China. The site includes photos and video.

Rare Tibetan and Mongolian books online

A new project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, seeks to give digital access to rare Mongolian and Tibetan manuscripts to scholars around the world.

World of Khubilai Khan at the Met

September 28, 2010 - January 2, 2011, the Metropolitan Museum of Art will play host to The World of Khubilai Khan: Chinese Art in the Yuan Dynasty, an exhibit of fine and decorative art from the 13th and 14th centuries.

Freer Gallery to present exhibit on Chinese painting

The Freer Gallery of Art in Washngton, D.C. will present Masterpieces of Chinese Painting June 12 - November 28, 2010. The exhibit will showcase Chinese painting from the late 10th to the early 18th century.

Sacred Caves of the Silk Road

A recent issue of National Geographic visits the Mogao caves of Dunhuang, China. Located along the Silk Road, the Mogao caves are a series of man-made caves carved into the cliffs between the 6th and 14th centuries.