artdaily.org

An online art newspaper, established in 1996

What lies beneath?

Museum conservationists never know what they might discovered under layers of paint and grime. What lies beneath the surface is the subject of a new display at London's National Portrait Gallery which reveals, for the first time, some of the conservationists' findings.

Codex Chimalpahin to return to Mexico

The Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico City is celebrating the return of the Codex Chimalpahin, a three-volume, hand-written, indigenous account vividly documenting the history of Aztec Mexico in Pre-Hispanic and 16th Century New Spain. Dan Colen of Art Daily has a feature story (photo)

Re-enactors gather for Bannockburn anniversary

The battle of Bannockburn took place 700 years ago near Stirling, Scotland. Now the legendary battle has been commemorated by more than 250 re-enactors from around the world. (photos)

French museum hosts Shakespearean costume exhibit

The National Centre for Stage Costumes in Moulins, France is playing host to an elaborate display of Shakespearean theatrical costumes entitled Shakespeare, l'étoffe du monde. The silk, satin and gemstone-studded costumes reflect designs from over a century of productions.

British books barred from leaving England

The British Library has been successful in acquiring the Catholicon Anglicum, a 15th-century English-Latin dictionary, and a printed traictise owned and annotated by John Ponet, thanks to the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest which barred the books from export.

"Impressive basilica" unearthed at Moshav Aluma

Archaeologists from the Israel Land Authority have discovered a 6th century Byzantine basilica, featuring "magnificent mosaic" floors, at Moshav Aluma, near Pelugot Junction, in Israel. (photo)

Old Masters Week to feature sale of the Rothschild Prayerbook

Representatives from Christie's auction house in New York have announced that the centerpiece of its January 2014 Old Masters Week auctions will be The Rothschild Prayerbook, considered to be "the finest illuminated manuscript in private hands." The manuscript was created for a member of the Dutch court in 1505. (photo)

Elizabeth reference found in Raleigh portrait

The recent restoration of a portrait of Sir Walter Raleigh has revealed a secret: a hidden crescent moon over water, a symbol of the explorer's devotion to Queen Elizabeth I. The portrait is on display at the National Portrait Gallery in London until January 5, 2014. (photo)

Charlemagne comes to Switzerland

Visitors to Zurich, Switzerland may want to visit a new exhibit at the Swiss National Museum entitled Charlemagne and Switzerland, opening September 2013. Art Daily has a review.

Medieval Samurai artifacts to be auctioned

Wealthy collectors are checking their pocket books at the announcement of the auction of several 13th century Samurai swords made by master maker Bizen Nagamitsu, estimated to sell between US $150,000 and $200,000. The swords, as well as other weapons and armor, will be auctioned October 8, 2013 by Bonhams in New York. (photo)

Situation is critical for Saint Hilarion Monastery

Saint Hilarion, at Tel Umm al-Amr in the Gaza Strip, is considered the Holy Land's oldest monastery. The site, named for a 4th century hermit, is in danger of destruction due to lack of funds.

"Spectacular colorful mosaic" found in Kibbutz Bet Qama dig

Archaeologists working on an excavation at Kibbutz Bet Qama, in the B’nei Shimon region of Israel were surprised to discover a beautifully-preserved, Byzantine mosaic dating to the 4th - 6th centuries. The mosaic adorned the floor in what experts believe was a public building. (photo)

Cologne excavations reveal rich Jewish history

For years, archaeologists have concentrated on Roman excavations in western Germany, largely ignoring its medieval past, especially when it came to Jewish history. Now the discovery of over 250,000 artifacts in Cologne, is revealing new insights into "one of Europe's oldest and biggest Jewish communities."

Byzantine wine press discovered beneath the streets of Tel Aviv

What is believed to be a large wine press, dating to the 6th or 7th century, has been discovered beneath the streets of Tel Aviv-Yafo municipality in Israel during modernization of the city's infrastructure. The installation was the first important Byzantine structure in the city. (photo)

11th century Jewish documents found in Afghan fox den

Two years ago, the chance discovery of a collection of documents in a cave in Afghanistan gave experts a first ever glimpse of 11th century "religious, cultural and commercial life of the Jewish community in a central location on the trade route between China and the West."

“Roads of Arabia" premieres in Washington, D.C.

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C. is currently playing host to Roads of Arabia: Archaeology and History of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, an "unprecedented assembly" of artifacts which tell the story of of the trade routes across the Arabian Peninsula.

Bali's "biggest ancient Hindu temple" found

Construction workers in Denpasar, Bali have discovered the remains of a stone temple at a Hindu study center believed to be the largest Hindu temple ever found on the island. Archaeologists have identified the foundations of the 20-metre-long east wing of the structure.

Early Christian art on display in New York

Visitors to New York City with an interest in Byzantine or Early Christian art may want to pay a visit to the Onassis Cultural Center in Midtown Manhattan to view Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd – 7th Century AD, a display of 170 pieces of art from museums in Greece and Cyprus.

The Renaissance comes to Canberra

The National Gallery of Australia in Canberra will play host to the "first ever exhibition in Australia dedicated to Renaissance paintings." Artdaily.org has a review. Renaissance – 15th & 16th Century Italian Paintings from the Accademia Carrara, Bergamo will be open December 9, 2011 - April 9, 2012.

Mayan royal tomb found

The well-sealed tomb of a Mayan king has offered a treasure trove of new information for scholars. Archaeologists at El Zotz in Guatemala found the tomb in May, but kept their discovery secret until recently in an effort to protect the find from looters.