Medievalists.net

A website providing "news, resources and information for the community of people who are interested in the Middle Ages."

Cod, not elephants, brought down Greenland settlements

For the past ten years, Norse scholars have debated whether the breakdown in trade of walrus ivory brought down the Norse settlements in Greenland during the 15th century. In a new article, scholar Kirsten Seaver disputes the theory and offers her own: English cod fishing.

Lycanthropy and the Byzantines

Apparently the Byzantines had a werewolf problem, according to a new article by four scholars from the University of Athens. "Lycanthropy in Byzantine times ([CE] 330–1453)," looks at how doctors in the Empire dealt with patients who believed they were werewolves.

Annual edition of "Medieval Archaeology" released

Volume 53 of Medieval Archaeology: Journal of the Society for Medieval Archaeology has been released by Maney Publishing. The academic journal specializes in the medieval archaeology of Britain and Ireland.

Medieval Paris' "Carolingian Wall" found

A team of archaeologists from the Institut national des recherches archaeologiques has discovered the fortifications of medieval Paris.

Experts assess condition of Scotland's cliff-bound Old Wick

An archaeologist and a stonemason recently risked life and limb to investigate the ruins of the Old Man of Wick, a 12th century Scottish castle believed to have been built by Harald Maddadsson, the Earl of Orkney. The castle is perched precariously on the edge of a cliff overlooking the sea.

Minnesota professor to receive grant for medieval globalization research

University of Minnesota professor Susan Noakes has received a US$70,000 grant for two years for a project entitled “Globalization of the Middle Ages.” The research will be funded by the university's Imagine Fund.

Medieval conference marks Cambridge University's 800th anniversary

Knowledge and Learning in the Middle Ages: A Conference Celebrating the 800th Anniversary of the University of Cambridge is the title of the one-day conference hosted by the Magdalene Society of Medievalists. registration is now open for the June 13, 2009 conference.

Mark S. Weiner receives Fulbright Fellowship to teach in Iceland

Law professor and legal history scholar Mark S. Weiner, who currently teaches at Rutgers School of Law-Newark, has received a Fulbright Fellowship to teach and undertake research at the University of Akureyri, Iceland. The fellowship will begin in the fall of 2009.

Pope creates two new medieval saints

Among the five new saints created recently by Pope Benedict were a 14th century Portuguese friar and an early 14th-century Sienese aristocrat. The saints were canonized in a ceremony at the Vatican.

Interview with historian Natalie Zemon Davis

Medievalists.net features an interview with Dr. Natalie Zemon Davis, Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton University, who currently teaches at the University of Toronto. Davis is the author of nine books and more than 80 articles, "many of which focus on the social and cultural history of 16th century France.

Turkey Restores Ancient Armenian Church as Show of Goodwill

Akdamar Church, also called the Church of Surp Khach, or Holy Cross, an Armenian structure dating back to 921 C.E., is being restored in a US$1.5 million project being undertaken by Turkey as a step towards improving relationships between the two neighboring countries.

Medievalists.net web site "devoted to the medieval world"

Medievalists.net is a new web site and affiliated blog with articles about the history of the Middle Ages. The blog's syndicated headlines are now offered as an optional feature on SCAtoday.net.