Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Call for papers on Viking Age Culture

The Annual IMR Postgraduate Conference at the University of Nottingham in England is calling for papers to be presented at its conference to be held July 5, 2013. The deadline for submission is April 1, 2013

Higgins Armory to close

The Higgins Armory Museum, much beloved of SCAdians, will be closing at the end of the year. The museum houses one of the biggest collections of arms and armor in the United States.

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

Medieval village found in Scotland

A previously unknown medieval village has been unearthed near Selkirk, Scotland.  The site was found during costruction of a water main.

The heart of a king

Forensic analysis of the heart of Richard I of England, the Lionheart, have revelaed traces mint, myrtle, and frankincense, indicating the heart was embalmed. The heart was probably wrapped in linen.

Historians argue over head of Henry IV

Historians continue to debate over the authenticity of a mummifed head found in the attic of a tax collector. Some believe it is the remains of "good King Henri" (Henry IV of France, murdered in 1610), while others believe the claim is "rubbish."

Saint-Denis - A Town in the Middle Ages

A web site offers a wide-ranging virtual tour of the area, from the town and abbey to the inhabitants, crafts, daily life, and archeology from the 4th century through the Middle Ages and up to today.

Grave of Russian warrior yields weapons and treasure

Excavations of a grave in the Caucasus mountains in Russia have revealed a man buried with gold, armor, and weapons. The burial dates to between 400 BCE and 200 CE.

Additional Staffordshire finds declared treasure

Over 80 additional artifacts found in the area of the Staffordshire Hoard have been declared treasure. The gold and silver items were discovered near the original site when a field was ploughed. (photo)

A new look at Viking women

“To assume that Viking men were ranked above women is to impose modern values on the past, which would be misleading,” cautions Marianne Moen one of the organizers of the Viking Worlds Conference, to be held in March 2013.

Drought reveals early Byzantine city

For a thousand years, the Byzantine port city of Bathonea lay hidden and forgotten beneath farmland, but a recent drought revealed the town's seawall, leading to the discovery of a "well-connected, wealthy, fully outfitted harbor city that thrived from the fourth to 11th century." (photos)

Power lines to come down at Sutton Hoo

A UK£200,000 grant is set to finance the removal of power lines and poles from the site of the world-famous Anglo-Saxon burial mounds at Sutton Hoo near Woodbridge, England. Over a mile of lines will be replaced with underground cables.

Remains of King Richard III found

DNA analysis has confirned that the skeleton found buried underneath a parking lot in Leicester, England are those of King Richard III. The king, who died in 1485, was demonized in literature and in history as the man who killed two young princes in the Tower of London.

In search of rockets

While rockets are often thought of as the realm of modern scientists and the military, they have their roots in medieval China. This article traces their roots from a 12th century party trick to their evolution as the terror of Mongolian invaders.

Retire in beautiful Lincoln!

The city of Lincoln, England has been a Roman outpost since the first century. Situated on the trade route between London and York, the area was first a fortress town and later a colonia, a retirement settlement for soldiers who wished to stay in Britain.

Cold weather not reason for Viking abandonment of Greenland

A recent study by a team of Danish-Canadian scientists rules out cold weather as the reason that the Vikings abandoned their settlements in Greenland in the 15th century. When cold destroyed crops, say the experts, the settlers just changed their diets to seal meat.

Gaming Piece or Roman Toilet Paper?

Think your toilet paper is rough? Try these! Formerly thought to be broken Roman "gaming pieces", these round ceramic  discs are now believed to be the equivalent of a roll of toilet paper.

"Unexpected" Roman theatre found in Kent

Dr Paul Wilkinson, founder of the Kent Archaeological Field School, believes that he and his team have discovered the remains of a Roman theatre - the first in Britain - right in his backyard.

65 yards of influential Roman road revealed

A short stretch of Roman road in York, England may  have been a walkway for some of the city's most influential citizens, and "probably even witnessed the very first Christians on their way to worship,” according to the Dean of York, Vivienne Faull.

Army departure leaves Roman lifestyle behind

Archaeologists in Devon County, England are pondering the remains of a Roman settlement which thrived after the Roman army left the area for northern conquests.

Fermanagh crannog reveals wealth of Irish history

An archaeological dig at a crannog in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland, has yielded a wealth of new insight into the living conditions of medieval families on the artifical island.

Falkirk historian to team with Historic Scotland to promote Antonine Wall

In 2008, the Antonine Wall, which runs between the firths of the Forth and Clyde in Scotland, was added to UNESCO's World Heritage Sites. Now Historic Scotland hopes to team with citizens from the Falkirk district to promote the area as a tourist destination.

"World's biggest shipwreck collection" revealed under Bosphorus

Since 2006, construction workers in Istanbul have worked along with archaeologists to uncover layer after layer of Byzantine history buried beneath the city and the Bosphorus Strait. Now the transit and tunnel project has revealed the "world's biggest shipwreck collection ever found."

Roman cemetery discovered in Somerset

Construction workers laying a four-mile (7km) long water main between Banwell and Hutton, England uncovered a Roman cemetery. Experts believe the cemetery was associated with a nearby Roman villa.

The complexity of identifying Richard III

Archaeologists, historians and royalists are waiting with bated breath for the determination of the identity of a skeleton found in Leicester, England. The skeleton is believed to be that of King Richard III, but they may have a long wait for the test results.

Ancient Japanese warrior found still wearing his armor

A skeleton of a man wearing metal armor has been found in Gunma, Japan. The armor dates to the early 6th century and is very well preserved.

Additional pieces added to the Stafforshire Hoard

Archaeologists have returned to the field where the Staffordshire Hoard was found to look for more pieces. Several gold pieces fit in with items already identified.

Should Viking loot be returned?

Scandinavian museums proudly display artifacts plundered throughout Europe by the Vikings, but now some museum curators ask if these stolen treasures should be returned to their original countries.

Southwell skeleton identified as "deviant dead"

A 6th-7th century skeleton, discovered in 1959 in the town of Southwell, Notts, England, has been classified as a "deviant burial" by Matthew Beresford, of Southwell Archaeology.

Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum to receive grant

The Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum project has received a grant of UK£900,000 to promote community archaeology and to "encourage dialogue about this historic battle and how it has impacted communities from both sides of the Borders."