Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

50 volumes of "Medieval Archaeology" online

The Society for Medieval Archaeology has announced that the first fifty volumes of Medieval Archaeology have been made available in digital form.

Highway excavation produces ancient treasures in Romania

The excavation for a new highway in Romania has unearthed a plethora of artifacts - from Greek and Roman coins to a Celtic miniature chariot. Archaeologists have taken control of the site with the goal to preserve the artifacts for the country.

In search of Kitezh

Archaeologists are looking for evidence of Kitezh, the “Russian Atlantis,” on the shores of Svetloyar Lake near Nizhny Novgorod. According to legend, Kitezh is "a hidden city where the righteous live and work in prayer, and where only the chosen ones can enter."

"Immense volcanic eruption" may have led to death of thousands in medieval England

Archaeologists for the Museum of London recently discovered 175 mass graves dating to around 1250, 100 years before the Black Plague. What killed over 10,000 people in England may have been an immense volcanic eruption.

Large Roman cemetery found in Norfolk

Excavations for a housing development in Great Ellingham, Norfolk, England have uncovered a large cemetery dating to Roman times. The 85 graves are thought to belong to a rural settlement.

Byzantine-era olive press discovered in Israel

An olive press dating to the 6th – 8th century CE has been discovered at a road construction site near Hod HaSharon in Israel. The press "had been carved into huge building slabs that were sunk into the ground."

Roman Brits enjoyed a "refined diet"

Ongoing excavations at the Silchester Roman Town in Hampshire, England show that Roman citizens in the area seasoned their food with spices imported from the Mediterranean, and enjoyed foods such as olives, celery and dill, native to warmer climes.

Whitehall Roman Villa dig completed

In 1996, archaeologists began the investigation of Whitehall Farm in Northamptonshire, England, and were pleased to find coins and pottery buried beneath the farmland. Now, in 2012, the Whitehall Farm Roman Villa and Landscape Project has been completed. (photo)

Roman dig to showcase "level of history" in Ewell, England

Archaeologists believe that there had been continuous occupation of the area around Ewell Village in England since the 4th Century. Now a three-week dig hopes to uncover evidence of a Roman settlement along the road which ran from Chichester to London. (video)

The truth about "really dirty Vikings"

Many movies and books portray Vikings as "really dirty savages who wore horned helmets," but the website ScienceNordic sets the record straight with the educational article What Vikings really looked like.

Trusty’s Hill reveals royal Scottish stronghold

Archaeologists working at Trusty’s Hill, near Gatehouse of Fleet in Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, have unearthed an early medieval Pictish fort. Artifacts at the site were protected by the collapsed ramparts of the fort.

Hoard of gold coins found in crusader castle

"This is the first hoard of gold coins that we have in Israel that we can date to the Crusader period," said Oren Tal, director of the excavation of the 13th century Crusader castle of Arsur, where a hoard of 108 gold coins was recently discovered.

Olive pit sheds light on early British imports

The discovery of a 1st century BCE olive pit found at an archaeological site in England gives further evidence to the theory that trade in Mediterranean luxury goods pre-dates the Roman empire.

Modern warriors help excavate ancient ones

British soldiers taking part in an excavation in Wessex found fellow soldiers buried 1,400 years ago. The modern soldiers were part of a rehabilitation program for those who were wounded in Afghanistan.

Did Stonehenge unify Britain?

Experts from the Stonehenge Riverside Project have concluded that "Stonehenge was built as a monument to unify the peoples of Britain, after a long period of conflict and regional difference between eastern and western Britain."

Artifacts discovered in 13th century Bulgarian monastery

A team of archaeologists has found a number of structures and artifacts, dating to the 13th century, from an excavation of the St. Peter and St. Paul Monastery at Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire.

Elizabethan pottery hoard found in England

A large amount of glazed late16th century pottery has been found in a garden in Rainford, England. The find includes many drinking vessels.

Fabled seat of Danish kings discovered in Germany

A team of Danish archaeologists believe they have discovered the fabled Viking town Sliasthorp by the Schlei bay in northern Germany, the "center of power for the first Scandinavian kings." The discovery may give a new prospective on Scandinavian military organization. (photo)

Medieval fishing hut excavated in Iceland

Archaeologists are racing against erosion to excavate a 15th century fishing hut in Iceland. While people in the area have been known for centuries to use temporary huts during the fishing season, this one shows signs of longer occupation.

Archaeologists hunt for site of Battle of Lewes

In 1264, England's King Henry III refused to honor an agreement given to his barons, thus initiating the Battle of Lewes and prompting the creation of Parliament. Now an archaeological dig is underway to locate the site of the historic battle.

Scientists claim to have found the remains of Mona Lisa

Archaeologists excavating the Convent of Saint Ursula in Florence believe they have found the remains of Lisa Gherardini, thought by art historians to be the model for Leonardo DaVinci's famed Mona Lisa.

1000 years in Sicily: from Roman villa to monastery

For over 1,000 years, a farmland estate in the northeastern Sicilian village of Torrenova was in constant use, according to archaeologists from the University of Vienna. The land is believed to have hosted a Roman villa in late antiquity and a monastery throughout the Middle Ages. (photo)

Anglo-Saxon woman found buried with cow

Archaeologists excavating a late 5th century CE grave in Cambridgeshire, England have come across something completely uniquie - a women buried with a cow. This is the first known burial from this period of a woman with an animal in England, and the first case of anyone being buried with a cow.

Japanese tomb yields Roman jewelery

Glass beads found in a 5th century tomb near Kyoto, Japan probably originated somewhere in the Roman empire. The beads were made between the 4th and 1st centuries CE.

Trepanned skulls found in Spain

Two skulls were found in Spain with holes drilled in them. The skulls were found in a cemetery that dates to the 13th and 14th centuries.

Queen's jewelery found in medieval toilet

Archaeologists excavating a latrine at the site of a palace outside of Paris, France have found a hair pin belinging to 16th century French queen Catherine de Medici.

Remains of St. John the Baptist found (again)

Archaeologists excavating a church in Bulgaria have found a small ossuary with an inscription claiming to be the remains of St. John. Radio carbon and DNA testing have given some collaboration to the claim.

Byzantine settlement found in central Greece

Construction workers excavating for a new home uncovered the remains of a Byzantine settlement recently in Lefokastron in central Greece. Experts believe the 11 sites date between the 4th and 11th centuries.

Irish shipwreck the site of mystery and coconuts

A shipwreck found off the coast of Ireland carried an exotic cargo of Iberian pottery and coconuts. The coconuts, which likely sank in the late 16th or early 17th century, would mark the earliest known arrival of this fruit in Ireland.

New terracotta warriors found in China

Over 100 new terracotta warriors have been found in China, some with bright paint on them. Terracotta horses along with real weapons and parts of a chariot have also been found.