Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

R.I.P. Lucius Valerius Geminus

Lucius Valerius Geminus is dead. In fact, he's been dead since the 1st century CE, but thanks to the discovery of his tombstone, archaeologists now know something about the Roman soldier who died in Oxfordshire.

Winter storms may point experts to 13th century Cromarty

The 2012 winter storm surge has been a boon for archaeologists working near Cromarty in the Scottish Highlands. The storms washed away part of the shore, revealing what may be part of the 13th century town.

Roman cemetery at Glevum excavated

Experts from Cotswold Archaeology have discovered a number of new burials in what they believe was the cemetery for the Roman city of Glevum, now Gloucester. "This is probably one of the most significant finds that has been made within Gloucester within the last 30 years. It will add greatly to the knowledge of the [city]," said archaeologists Stuart Joyce.

11th century Byzantine graves found in Turkey

Three tombs, believed to be those of a man, woman and child, dating to the 11th century, have been discovered near the city of Komana in northern Turkey. The site of the excavation was known in the  Byzantine era as a "temple city," the first so described from the time period.

Medieval graves discovered by a badger

An artist in North Germany watching badgers on his property discovered that they were digging up human bones. An excavation revealed eight 12th century burials, including several warriors.

Viking voyages to southern Newfoundland proved

"Provocative" new evidence shows that Vikings may have sailed south from their settlement in northern Newfoundland to Notre Dame Bay, where they may have encountered native inhabitants of the island.

Polish church may hold remains of Grunwald knights

Scientists and employees of the Museum of the Battle of Grunwald have completed a survey using ground penetrating radar (GPR) with hopes of establishing the burial site of fallen knights from the battle. The search is centered around a parish church in Stębark near Grunwald, Poland.

The mystery of the missing manor

Excavations at an archaeological site at Longforth Farm in Wellington, England have discovered a 900-year-old medieval manor that never existed, at least in historical records. What is the building, and why has it disappeared from the records? Inquiring minds want to know.

Roman wall discovered in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Museum in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered the remains of a 5th century Roman wall near the regional broadcasting centre of Bulgarian National Radio and Bulgarian National Television.

Medieval Easter egg discovered in Ukraine

A 500 year old "pysanka" Easter egg was found during an archaeological dig of a cistern in Lviv, Ukraine. The egg is probably a goose egg and is very well preseved.

Welsh site spans Roman and medieval periods

The time between when the Romans left Britain and the medieval period began has usually been considered a dark age lacking in civilization, but a new archaeological discovery in Caernarfon, Wales may help to fill in the gaps.

Lost Welsh artifact found in stream

A chance stroll through a Welsh woods has led to the discovery of a long-lost medieval artifact. A rare 9th or 10th century inscribed stone was spotted by archaeologists Nikki Vousden and Roderick Bale in a stream near St Sulien’s Church in Silian, Wales. (photo)

Double Viking ship burial discovered in Estonia

A team of workers laying electrical cable through the village of Salme on the island of Saaremaa in Estonia were stunned to stumble across a early Viking era ship burial containing the remains of warriors and their possessions. More extraordinary was the discovery of a second, larger ship a mere 30m (98ft) from the other.

Leicester site reveals double coffin

The now famous car park in Leicester, England has revealed another interesting find - a stone coffin containing another lead coffin. This is the same site where Richard III's remains were found in 2012.

Lyminge excavations shed light on the "Dark Ages"

After the Romans left Britain in the 5th century, the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes moved in, bringing their culture and architecture to the country. The recent discovery of what is believed to be an Anglo-Saxon royal feasting hall in the Kent, England village of Lyminge is shining a new light on the 7th century in England. Jason Urbanus of Archaeology has a feature story. (aerial photos)

Climate change threatens Jamestown

Venice may not be the only historic city threatened by rising ocean waters caused by climate change. Jamestown, the first successful English colony in America, may soon be under water. Christopher Joyce of  NPR's All Things Considered has the audio story. (photos)

Fort search hopes to change perception of Romans in Scotland

"People are always surprised when I tell them about the Roman occupation of the area - they think the Romans never got any further than the Antonine Wall or even Hadrian's Wall which simply isn't true," said Dr Birgitta Hoffmann who leads an effort to discover a "lost" Roman fort in Scotland.

Haverhill research center to be built over Roman farm

Archaeologists working on what will become the Haverhill Research Park have discovered artifacts ranging from the Iron Age to the 19th century on the site. The science research complex will be constructed on what was once a 2nd century Roman farm.

Sozopol "vampire" gets a face

In 2012, a skeleton, buried with a ploughshare in its chest, was found in Sozopol, Bulgaria on the Black Sea. Now the "medieval vampire" has been given the facial reconstruction treatment by anthropologist Yordan Yordanov.

Looters unearth Byzantine church in Jordan

In most cases, looters are detrimental to archaeological sites, but recently in Jerash, Jordan, the criminals began the process that led to the discovery of a 6th century Byzantine church with an amazing mosaic floor.

Medieval house found near Conwy Castle in Wales

Workers from Dwr Cymru Welsh Water, digging a trench,  were surprised to find the remains of a medieval house and cesspit beneath Castle Street near Conwy Castle in Wales. The "incredibly important" find could "provide a new insight into medieval Conwy."

Wrecked merchant ship salvaged off coast of Vietnam

After five long months of battling sand and seawater off the coast of the Binh Son district in Vietnam, experts have recovered a wealth of 14th century artifacts from a shipwreck, possibly associated with the silk and pottery road.

New Leicester parking lot discovery

It's been quite a year for Leicester archaeologists. First there was the discovery of Richard III under a parking lot. Now a 3rd century Roman cemetery has been found under a second lot. The cemetery includes 13 burials -- both Christian and Pagan, an unusual practice at the time.

Richard's head goes on tour

Richard III is getting the rockstar treatment these days, and now he is scheduled to go on tour - or at least his head is. The re-constructed head, created using the king's actual skull, will go on display in Leicester, Bosworth, York, Northampton and the British Museum. The head will eventually reside at a museum dedicated to the discovery.

Excavations underway at St. Augustine, Florida

In 1565, St. Augustine was founded and became the first continuously-occupied European settlement in what would later become the continental United States. For the past 37 years, archaeologist Dr. Kathy Deagan of the University of Florida has spent her summers excavating the area of the "Fountain of Youth" and learn more about the early Spanish settlement. (video)

Exploratory excavations at Clare Castle considered "exciting"

For nine days in the spring of 2013, volunteers joined archaeologists to work on four investigative trenches on the grounds of Clare Castle in Suffolk, England. The result was the discovery of human remains, leading experts to believe that a previously-unknown church existed on the property, possibly before the construction of the castle.

Ancient gold figurine found in Danish field

A gold figurine of a bound, nude woman has been found in a farm field in Bornholm, Denmark. This is the fifth gold figurine found near each other in the same field. The woman dates to the 6th century CE.

Richard III generates first research paper

It must have been a race to the finish line, but the first academic paper to be published on the discovery of the remains of Richard III is The king in the car park: new light on the death and burial of Richard III in the Grey Friars church, Leicester, in 1485 by Richard Buckley, Mathew Morris, Jo Appleby, Turi King, Deirdre O'Sullivan, and Lin Foxhall.

New world duel may be the answer to colonial murder mystery

Excavations in 1996 at Jamestown, VA (USA) revealed that one of its earliest settlers died of a gunshot wound. Researchers now believe they have solved his murder. They believe the man was named George Harrison and that he was killed in a duel.

Conference reflects new interest in King Arthur

In recent years, archaeologists have renewed their interest in finding the historic King Arthur. At the Footsteps of King Arthur Conference in Glastonbury, England, experts urged each other to keep looking, possibly as far north as Scotland.