Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

"Lost" medieval village found beneath Southwell

Archaeologist Matt Beresford is hoping that his team will find conclusive evidence that a "lost" pre-Norman village may be found beneath the streets of the Nottinghamshire town of Southwell. The project was being funded by a UK£5,800 Heritage Lottery grant. (photos)

Roman temple near Hadrian's Wall identified

The remains of a building near Hadrian's Wall, dating to the second century and first unearthed in the 1880s by a local archaeologist, have been identified as a Roman temple. The temple is the most north western classical temple from the Roman world yet discovered.

Will excavations at Grey Friars uncover headless bodies of executed monks?

80 years before Ricard III was buried at Leicester's Grey Friars church, three friars were beheaded by Henry IV for spreading rumors about the continued life of the deposed Richard II. Now archaeologists hope to solve the mystery by discovering their graves.

"Vampire" graves found in Poland

Archaeologists in Poland, investigating a roadway construction site, have discovered a group of what they consider "vampire" graves containing skeletons whose heads have been severed from their bodies and placed at their feet, "a ritualized execution designed to ensure the dead stayed dead."

Archaeological survey hopes to locate War of the Roses battlefield

Historical documents show that in 1460 a decisive battle took place on the grounds of Northampton's Delapre Abbey, leading to Yorkist Edward lV taking the throne of England, but the actual site of the battle has never been identified. Now archaeologists hope to locate the site before the area becomes a sports field.

Archaeologists search for graves at Flodden

In September 1513, thousands of bodies were buried on or around the battlefield of Flodden in Northumberland, England. Now, 500 years later, excavation has taken place to locate and protect the remains and to declare the burials as war dead.

Boat burials might help solve mystery of Viking trading center

To most historians, Steinkjer was just a name mentioned in the Norse Sagas, but new evidence discovered in two boat graves in Lø, Norway, may have solved the puzzle of the mysterious trading center.

Remains of Irish mother and children considered "significant"

Experts from the Caherconnell Archaeological School are pondering the discovery of the remains of a “45-year-old plus” woman" and two infants beneath the remains of the 10th century cashel (fort). The archaeologists believe that the remains belong to a wealthy family, possibly the local Gaelic rulers, the O’Loughlins.

New book relocates Battle of Bosworth

For centuries, everyone knew that the Battle of Bosworth, which led to the death of Richard III and the ascendence of the Tudors, took place on Ambion Hill, but new research by Glenn Foard and Anne Curry places the site two miles away by a marsh called Fen Hole.

Secret of Northamptonshire chapel revealed

Under an unassuming village church in Rothwell, England lies a 700-year-old crypt containing hundreds of skeletons, only one of two still remaining in the country. Why were they there? Experts from the University of Sheffield's Department of Archaeology think they know. (photos)

High-class tableware among finds at Ewell site

Roman Ewell, in Surrey, England, was once located along the Stane Street, between London and Chichester, and acted as a market center, suppling travelers with accommodations and food for their journeys. Now the Church Meadow Project is taking a look at the 2nd century site and what it can tell experts about its history. (photos)

Late Roman well offers insight into technology

A well-preserved, late-Roman well near Heslington, England demonstrates use of the latest technology of the time, including curved stone facings and a dish-shaped base. Archaeologists from the University of York believe the well had "significance in contemporary local agricultural cycles and fertility practices."

Richard III to be honored with Leicester museum

The Leicester City Council has approved plans to construct a UK£4m Richard III museum on and around the car park where the king's remains were discovered. The building is expected to be completed in 2014. (slideshow)

Experts prepare to solve mystery of Lincoln Castle sarcophagus

During the reconstruction of Lincoln Castle in England, archaeologists discovered an elaborate, stone sarcophagus believed to date from the 10th century. Now plans are being made to open the tomb and discover who might lie inside.

Remains of Spanish Jews "well preserved"

In 2008, archaeologists unearthed a 13th century Jewish cemetery in Toledo, Spain. A comprehensive study of the burials was recently completed, identifying and cataloguing the 107 tombs. Experts declared the remains “well preserved” and deposited unusually deep in the ground.

Lottery money to help Chester Farm

2,000 years of English history will be open for study thanks to a UK£4m grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund to restore and investigate various sites at Chester Farm, in Irchester, England.

Early Christian grave found in Iceland

Archeologist Margrét Hallmundsdóttir believes that a skeleton discovered in 2012 in Hrafnseyri, Iceland, dates to around 1000 CE, the year of the country's conversion to Christianity. The grave was found in the vicinity of a church, dating to the same time period.

R.I.P. Lucius Valerius Geminus

Lucius Valerius Geminus is dead. In fact, he's been dead since the 1st century CE, but thanks to the discovery of his tombstone, archaeologists now know something about the Roman soldier who died in Oxfordshire.

Winter storms may point experts to 13th century Cromarty

The 2012 winter storm surge has been a boon for archaeologists working near Cromarty in the Scottish Highlands. The storms washed away part of the shore, revealing what may be part of the 13th century town.

Roman cemetery at Glevum excavated

Experts from Cotswold Archaeology have discovered a number of new burials in what they believe was the cemetery for the Roman city of Glevum, now Gloucester. "This is probably one of the most significant finds that has been made within Gloucester within the last 30 years. It will add greatly to the knowledge of the [city]," said archaeologists Stuart Joyce.

11th century Byzantine graves found in Turkey

Three tombs, believed to be those of a man, woman and child, dating to the 11th century, have been discovered near the city of Komana in northern Turkey. The site of the excavation was known in the  Byzantine era as a "temple city," the first so described from the time period.

Medieval graves discovered by a badger

An artist in North Germany watching badgers on his property discovered that they were digging up human bones. An excavation revealed eight 12th century burials, including several warriors.

Viking voyages to southern Newfoundland proved

"Provocative" new evidence shows that Vikings may have sailed south from their settlement in northern Newfoundland to Notre Dame Bay, where they may have encountered native inhabitants of the island.

Polish church may hold remains of Grunwald knights

Scientists and employees of the Museum of the Battle of Grunwald have completed a survey using ground penetrating radar (GPR) with hopes of establishing the burial site of fallen knights from the battle. The search is centered around a parish church in Stębark near Grunwald, Poland.

The mystery of the missing manor

Excavations at an archaeological site at Longforth Farm in Wellington, England have discovered a 900-year-old medieval manor that never existed, at least in historical records. What is the building, and why has it disappeared from the records? Inquiring minds want to know.

Roman wall discovered in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Museum in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered the remains of a 5th century Roman wall near the regional broadcasting centre of Bulgarian National Radio and Bulgarian National Television.

Medieval Easter egg discovered in Ukraine

A 500 year old "pysanka" Easter egg was found during an archaeological dig of a cistern in Lviv, Ukraine. The egg is probably a goose egg and is very well preseved.

Welsh site spans Roman and medieval periods

The time between when the Romans left Britain and the medieval period began has usually been considered a dark age lacking in civilization, but a new archaeological discovery in Caernarfon, Wales may help to fill in the gaps.

Lost Welsh artifact found in stream

A chance stroll through a Welsh woods has led to the discovery of a long-lost medieval artifact. A rare 9th or 10th century inscribed stone was spotted by archaeologists Nikki Vousden and Roderick Bale in a stream near St Sulien’s Church in Silian, Wales. (photo)

Double Viking ship burial discovered in Estonia

A team of workers laying electrical cable through the village of Salme on the island of Saaremaa in Estonia were stunned to stumble across a early Viking era ship burial containing the remains of warriors and their possessions. More extraordinary was the discovery of a second, larger ship a mere 30m (98ft) from the other.